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January 31, 1981 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1981-01-31

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Page 2-Saturday, January 31, 1981-The Michigan Daily

ReagaCn cut
deflates
inflation
fighters

WASHINGTON (AP) - In bureaucratic language, it's
called a "reduction in force." To 135 employees at the Coun-
cil on Wage and Price Stability, it's the stark realization that
they are losing their jobs.
And with a federal hiring freeze in place, anxiety is rising.
For many council staffers, finding work won't be easy.
"A LOT OF US suddenly are caught right in the middle,"
said Linda Cook, the council's public affairs director, who
faces an uncertain future after March 7, the day President
Reagan has set for dismissal of all but 35 employees.
"We're getting a bum deal," said Sylvia Taylor, a 34-year-
old secretary who has no idea where she will work next, after
11 years in the federal government.
Reagan on Thursday moved to abolish the council, saying
it had failed to control inflation and placed "unnecessary
burdens" on business and labor. That move came less than a
week 'after Reagan imposed the government-wide hiring
freeze, backdated to Nov. 5.
SINCE FORMER PRESIDENT Carter set up voluntary
wage-price guidelines in October 1978, more than 2,000 com-

panies have spent about $300 million complying with the
council's standards and reporting requirements.
Before the guidelines went into effect, consumer prices
were Pising about 7.5 percent a year. Since their imposition,
the inflation rate has averaged nearly 13 percent anually.
Now, most of the company reports will be burned, council
officials say - a symbol of the discouragement that abounds
throughout the depleted agency.
"IT'S IRONIC. We were in the forefront of Carter's anit-
inflation program, and now we're the first to go under
Reagan's anti-inflation scheme," said Mark Johnson, an
economist who will return to a university in several months.
Of the 135 staffers getting pink slips, about 45 have re-
employment rights at other federal agencies. But this doesn't
guarantee jobs, explains Cook.
The 35 staffers who have avoided dismissal are assigned to
the council's section that studies how government regulation
affects inflation. They probably will be transferred to other
agencies, some possibly to a presidential task force.

.X X X.. .... . . .-* . . .X. .

Law Library
changes sought

Because spae ir the Reading Room
is extremely limited, stw t sfv o
other schools should use their own
libraries u f ss they have an
im eiate need for legal mateeials.

L

THIS SIGN, posted in
the University Law
Library, is part of a law
student icampaign to
discourage un-
dergraduate students
from using the library.

Non-law students may be a k8 to leave.

(Continue'! from Page 1)
THE SENATE'S objective is not'to
shut down the library to everyone but
law students, said Law School Student
Senate President Doug Ellman.
But "we have to deal with the com-
plaints we get," Ellman said. "Many of
our fellow law ,students feel the library
is just too crowded."
The issue has been before the law
school student government several
times in recent years.
Two years ago, the Senate conducted
a survey asking law students if they
wanted to keep non-law students from
using the library. Ellman recalled that
the vote was 360 "yes" votes and 305
"no" votes.
"THE SURVEY we're running now is
trying to find out more than just
whether or not they want the un-
dergrads in," Ellman said, "We're
really looking for alternatives (to solve

overcrowding)."
Even if law students were to vote
overwhelmingly to bar undergraduates
from the library, Law School ad-
ministrators will probably be reluctant
to enforce any of the more restrictive
actions proposed on the referendum,
according to Steven Stankewicz, Senate
secretary.
"My position is there is no problem,"
Stankewicz said. "There's always plen-
ty of room in that library. I voted
against it."
SENATE MEMBERS will hold more
discussion on Law Library admittance
policies before any action is taken,
ElIman said.
Mark Stanton, an LSA junior who was
studying in the Law Library yesterday
afternoon, said he would be upset if any
of the proposals are implemented.
"I don't always use case books,"
Stanton said, "but I'm a political scien-
ce major that wants to go to law school,
and sometimes I do need to look up
cases."

111LE tAE
ilst yovr own I iltratiis.

r(;

I

Photo by DAVID HARRIS

- ___ a.~ a.~..

QiuIkClt0Iltp * EUtIE0 Botanical

FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
120 S. State St.
(Corner of State and Huron)
Worship Schedule:
8:30 a.m.-Holy Communion in the
Chapel.
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Morning Wor-
ship in the Sanctuary.
Sermon for Feb. 1 "Don't Look Back".
by Dr, Donald B. Strobe.
Church School for all ages-9:30 a.m.
and 11a.m.
Choir Rehearsal-Thursday at 7:15
p.m.
Ministers:
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
Rev. Fred B. Maitland",
Dr. Gerald R. Parker
Education Directors: Rose McLean
and Carol Bennington
* * *
WESLEY FOUNDATION
AT THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
(313) 668-6881
602 E. Huron at State
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104
A fellowship study and social issues
ministry for the university community.
TOM SCHOMAKER, Chaplain/Di-
rector.
ANN WILKINSON, Office Manager
This week's program :
5:30 Worship.
6:00 Shared Meal.
7:00 Similation Tool, "Where Do You
Draw the Line: An Ethics Game" with
Rev. Andrew Foster.
Thurs.,- Jan. 29, 7:30 P.M.
Peacemakers in Pine Room.
Support the
March of Dimes
BIRTH DEFECTS FOUNDATION

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
Serving the Campus for LC-MS
Robert Kavasch, Pastor
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
663-5560
Sunday Worship: 9:15 a.m. and 10:30
a.m.
Bible Class-9:15 a.ma
Wednesday Worship-10 p.m.
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH
(The Campus Ministry of the ALC-
LCA)
Gordon Ward, Pastor
801 S. Forest at Hill St.
Sunday Worship Service at 10:30
Sun. Feb. 1, 7:00 p.m. Workshop on
Suicide.
Wednesday 7:00 p.m. Choir Practice.
CHURCH OF SCIENTOLOGY
Huron Valley Mission
301 North Ingalls
(two blocks north of Rackham
Graduate School)
668-6113
Sunday Service-2:30 p.m.
Rev. Marian K. Kuhns
* 4 *
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huro'n
Pastor, Jitsu Morikawa
10:00 a.m.-"Walking Backwards"
by Dr. Robert McQuaid, guest preacher
of the Executive Minister of the
American Baptist Churches of
Michigan.
11:00 a.m.-Sunday School (for all
ages).
American Baptist Campus
Foundation
All students and faculty are invited to
attend worship service at 10 a.m. in the
sanctuary and Sunday School Classes
at 11a.m. in the Guild House.
Theology Discussion Group every
Thursday at 6 p.m.
(Complimentary brunch on second
Sunday of each month.)

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.-662-4466
(between S. University and Hill)
Campus Ministry Program
Campus Minister-Carl Badger
COLLEGE STUDENTS FELLOWSHIP
Activities: Sunday morning coffee
hour in between Services in the Social
Hall.
Bible Study on Tuesday evenings at
7:30 p.m. in the Founders room.
College Student's breakfast on Thurs-
day mornings at 8:00 a.m. in the
French room.
Worship Services-Sunday, 9:30 a.m.
and 11 a.m.
UNIVERSITY CHURCH
OF THE NAZARENE
409 South Division
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Rev. Steve Bringardner, 761-5941
Christian Education-9:45 a.m.
Service of Worship-11:00 a.m.
"Time of Meeting"-6:00 p.m.
* * *
CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw Ct.
A Campus Ministry of the Christian
Reformed Church
Rev. Don Postema, Pastor
10:00 a.m. Morning Worship: Service
of Holy Communion.
6:00 p.m.-Evening Celebration.
Evening Service of Holy Communio,
Wednesday: 10:00 p.m. Evening
Prayers.
ST. MARY'S CHAPEL
(Catholic).
331 Thompson-663-0557 I
Weekly Masses: S
Sat.-7:00 p.m.
Sun.-7:30 a.m., 9:00 a.m., 10:30 a.m.
(after 10:30 upstairs and downstairs)
12:00 noon, 5:00 p.m. (upstairs and
downstairs).
North Campus Mass at 9:30 a.m. in
Bursley Hall (Fall and Winter terms).
Rite of Reconciliation-4 p.m.-5 p.m.
on Friday only; any other time by ap-
pointment.

Gardens
M
budget -to
be pruned
( ontmued from Page 1i
can be maintained at the levels we
would wish.
"Thus," he added, "choices must be
made."
Botanical Gardens Director William
Benninghoff concurred. "I feel that we,
as many other areas of the University,
must look at operations and budgets to
see if we can make any savings," he
said. "This is something that must be
done under the present circumstan-
ces."
THE, FACULTY review committee
will be comprised of Botany Prof.
Charles Beck, chairman, Botany Prof.
William Anderson, and Zoology Prof.
James Cather.
The gardens, named after Mr. and
Mrs. Frederick Matthaei-who donated
them to the University in 1957-are
located about five miles northeast of
Ann Arbor. The five greenhouses, con-
vervatory, and 250 acres of land are
open to the general public and serve as
the site for many University classes
and research projects.
The labs of three University cour-
ses-Practical Botany, General
Ecology, and Woody Plant
Physiology-are currently held entirely
at the Botanical Gardens. Fifteen other
courses use the facilities oc-
casionally. Several adult education
courses are also taught in the Botanical
Gardens.
In addition, about 70 research projec-
ts are being conducted there.
The conservatory, rose garden, herb
garden, and the surrounding area are
open to the public. Benninghoff said he
didn't know how the budget cuts would
affect the gardens' public programs.
"We are very conscious of the impor-
tance of the Botanical Gardens to the
public," Knott said. "We know it has
been a favorite place for visitors for
some time. But we have to keep
foremost in our minds the Gardens' use
in research and teaching."
Sailors"
rummage for
top secrets
ORLANDO. Fla. (AP)-Sauads of

*-IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press international reports
South African commandos
bomb Mozambique capital
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - South African commandos helicop-
tered into the capital of Mozambique yesterday and destroyed the planning
headquarters of an exiled South African black guerrilla group.
The raid, which left eight persons dead, marked the first time that South
African forces attacked guerilla targets inside Mozambique.
The swift raid into suburban Maputo, capital of the neighboring Marxist
nation, appeared to herald a new escalation' in the war between black
nationalist guerrillas and white ruled South Africa.
Gen. Constand Viljeon, chief of South African defense forces, said the raid
was a warning that South Africa would pursue "the ememy wherever he
many be found."
"Neighboring states must now realize once and forever that the housing of
anti-South African terrorists contains a danger to their own safety and
stability," Viljoen said.
A Radio Mozambique broadcast last night quoted a Mozambican general,
identified only as Nguza, as saying the radi was "a murderous deed carried
out against refugees" and a violation of international law.
Polish talks progress
WARSAW, Poland - Poland's communist government appeared to reach
tentative agreement with independent labor leaders yesterday on the five-
day work week, a crucial issue in talks aimed at ending a wave of wildcat
strikes, a union representative said.
The union's demand for work-free Saturdays, a concession won from the
government during last summer's widespread strikes, has been a rallying
point in the country's spreading labor unrest.
Continuing strikes this week prompted stern warnings from the gover-
nment and drew sharp criticism from the Soviet Union, heightening concern
that the Soviets might intervene militarily.
The union's demand for work-free Saturdays was one of four major
grievances discussed at yesterday's meeting of leaders of-the independent
labor movement, Polish Premier Jozef Pinkowski, and other government of-
ficials.
Senate delays Donovan-
appointment to Cabinet
WASHINGTON - The Senate committee that cleared the nomination of
Raymond Donovan as labor secretary requested yesterday a formal report
of its lengthy hearings for use in next week's floor debate.
Confirmation proceedings normally are handled informally by commit-
tees, without printed documents. But the Donovan nomination has been
shrouded in controversy because of allegations linking him with organized
crime.
The New Jersey construction executive has denied all charges and an ex-
tensive FBI investigation did not find any evidence to back up the
allegations.
Judge bars distribution
of Penthouse magazine
ROANOKE, Virginia - A federal judge issued an order yesterday barring
any distribution of the March issue of Penthouse magazine which contains
an interview with Dr. Jerry Falwell, founder of the politically conservative
Moral Majority.
Falwell had sought the temporary restraining order contending the inter-
views he had given to two British writers were obtained under false preten-
ses, a Falwell spokesman said.
"I have never given interviews to smut magazines, nor do I practice
swimming in cesspools," said Falwell, pastor of the Thomas Road Baptist
Church in Lynchburg, Va.
Rich Jachetti, public relations director for Penthouse, told a Roanoke
television station that the magazine's lawyers view U.S. District Judge
James Turk's order as "unconstitutional."
Carlos may cancel
visit to U.S.
MADRID, Spain - King Juan Carlos, faced with Spain's worst political
crisis since the dictatorship of Gen. Francisco Franco, may have to cancel a
visit to the United States next month unless Parliament approves a new
government quickly, U.S. officials said yesterday.
The king began formal consultations with political, parties on a
replacement for former Premier Adolfo Suarez, who resigned unexpectedly
Thursday after nearly five years in office.
Palace sources said the resignation would not prevent Juan Carlos from
making a controversial visit next week to the rebellious northern Basque
region, where separatist guerrillas claimed responsibility for 95
assassinations last year.
But U.S. officials, who asked not to be named, said the king may have to
cancel a Feb. 9-17 visit to the United States if a new government is not in
place by then.
Suarez's ruling Union of the Democratic Center has nominated Deputy

Premier Leopoldo Calvo Sotelo to succeed him as premier and party chief.
If Parliament's lower house fails to confirm the new premier, Juan Carlos
is required by the constitution to call elections within two months.
Vol. XCI, No. 104
Saturday, January 31, 1981
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
_ of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109.
Subscription rates: $12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail
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0

"WHY DO THE HEATHEN RAGE?F"
Psalms 2:1 and Acts 4:25

"BUT MOSES STOOD UP AND HELPED THEM!" -
Exodus 2:17. One day Moses left his home, the palace of
the King, and took a trip to the land of Midian. He left and
traveled in great haste as if something was after him -
and there was! Doubtless being very tired from his forced
marches and hasty trip,he sat down to rest by a well in the
land of Midian.
After a while seven young women, sisters came and
began to draw water and fill the troughs to water their
father's flock. "And the shepherds came and drove them
away (doubtless to take the water for their own sheep and
save themselves a good deal of work) but Moses stood up
and helped them, and watered their flock." This was one
time these miserable wretches did not get by with their
"dirty deed." - Wonder if I would not have been afraid to

brow" as God commanded, but choose to go about prey-
ing on the fruits of men and women who fear God and
seek with His help to pay their own way through life! In my
judgment, in this category belong not only the gross
criminals, but those preachers, teachers, politicians, and
voters who tell us the government or somebody ought to
support and guarantee every man an income to live on,
regardless of his character, industry, or lack of either or
both!
If you are a true Christian you ought. to and will be
preaching by word and conduct such as: "GOD SHALL
REWARD EVERY MAN ACCORDING TO HIS WORK - IF
ANY MAN PROVIDE' NOT FOR HIS OWN HE HATH
DENIED THE FAITH, AND IS WORSE THAN AN INFIDEL
- IF A MAN WON'T WORK, DON'T LET HIM EAT - GO

Editor-in-Chief......... .
Managing Editor...... .
City Editor........ . . .
University Editors...... .
Features Editor.........
Opinion Page Editors...
Arts Editor . .

..... MARK PARRENT
.....MITCH CANTOR
.PATRICIA HAGEN
... TOMASMIRGA
BETH ROSENBERG
ADRIENNE LYONS
... JOSHUA PECK
HOWARD WITT
.ANNE GADON

Business Manager. ..
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ROSEMARY WtCKOWSKI
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TERRY DEAN REDDING
E. ANDREW PETERSEN

Sports Editor..T..E...............ALAN FANGER
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