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January 24, 1981 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1981-01-24

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Page 2-Saturday, January 24, 2981-The Michigan Daily
INFLATION HITS 12.4 PERCENT
Consumer prices up-again

WASHINGTON (AP) - Consumer
prices surged upward by 12.4 percent
last year, climaxing the worst three-
year period of inflation in the United
States since World War I, the gover-
nment reported yesterday.
The government's Consumer Price
Index ended the year at 258.4, whpich
means a consumer who bought goods
and services for $100 in 1967 would need
$258.4 to buy those same items at the
end of 1980.
THE COST OF living rose by 1.1 per-
cent in December, caused primarily by
-higher transportation, housing and food
expenses, the Labor Department said.
It was the fourth consecutive month

that consumer prices had jumped 1
percent or more.
The after-tax buying power of a
typical American worker sank 4.8 per-
cent during 1980, nearly as bad as the
5.3 percent loss in 1979, the department
said. And the:re was no sign that inflation
was about to cool.
,President Reagan has pledged sharp
reductions in federal taxes and spen-
ding in an, effort to overcome the
economic troubles that plagued Jimmy
Carter's presidency. Reagan met
yesterday with congressional
Republicans to discuss the economic
battle plan he is expected to announce
soon.
EVEN IF government spending is

slashed and the Federal ReserveJBoard
continues to restrain money growth, a
panel of economists told the
congressional Joint Economic Commit-
tee yesterday, any rapid improvement
in the inflation picture is unlikely.
Overall, said James Clifton, an
economist for the U.S. Chamber of
Commerce, "the basic rate of inflation,
however measured ... in all probability
will continue to be about as high in
1981" as the 12.4 percent increase
recorded last year.
Clifton said the housing industry will
continue to bear the brunt of a stagnant
economy,. even though he does not an-
ticipate another recession this year.
The Federal Reserve Board's policy of

restricting growth of the money supply
has sent mortgage and other interest
rates soaring.
"If the administration is able to move
with budget cuts and deregulation ..
that would have a good impact on in-
flationary expectations," Clifton said.
That would bring lower interest rates,
he added.
Economists told the congressional
committee they anticipate that food
prices will drop for the next couple
months but rise by 11 percent in 1981.
Experts also projected wage in-
creases at an average of nine to 18 per-
cent this year, after a 10 percent rise in
1980.

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Reagan,
aides focus
on PersiLan
Gulfpolicises

WASHINGTON - President Reagan and his senior
defense and foreign policy officials appear to be
focusing their early attention on safeguarding U.S.
interests in the vital Persian Gulf area.
Defense Department sources said yesterday the
Persian Gulf was a major topic of discussion at
Reagan's Cabinet meeting Thursday.
THE PRESIDENT, Defense Secretary Caspar
Weinberger, and Secretary of State Alexander Haig
all have been devoting considerable thought to this
problem, the sources said.
Weinberger was described as "carefully looking at
our stratgegy in the Persian Gulf."
Although no specifics were available, the sources
said Weinberger is "concerned about our whole
presence out there and what the new administration
might want to do" to strengthen protection of U.S. in-
terests.
WEINBERGER WAS said to be looking at what the
sources called "a grand strategy" aimed at
discouraging foreign governments from taking U.S.

hostages or from encouraging or supporing terrorists
in hostage seizures.
It appeared that the 14%-month U.S. ordeal over
Iran's seizure of American hostages was behind
Weinberger's study of how to deal with potential
recurrences stemming from terrorist activities in the
Middle East or elsewhere.
During his confirmation hearing before the Senate
Armed Services Committee earlier this month,
Weinberg er criticized as "clumsy and ill-advised"
the way former President Jimmy Carter pledged use
of U.S. military power to thwart any Soviet threat to
seize control of the oil-producing Persian Gulf.
In the short run, however, Reagan appears to be
concentrating on plans to welcome the 52 freed
American hostages to the White House on Tuesday.
White House press- secretary James Brady said
Reagan wants to permit the hostages and their
families a day of privacy on Sunday when they return
to the United States. On Monday, Brady said, press
interviews with the hostages will be permitted.
IM sports

. . . . . . . . . . . *~.* . ....... . . . . . .
as i S sanImiJiI*

QI1UVE W t t tUtE among

FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
120 S. State St.
(Corner of State and Huron)
Worship Schedule:
8:30 a.m.-Holy Communion in the
Chapel.
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Morning Wor-
ship in the Sanctuary.
Sermon for Jan. 25 "The Moral
Minority" by Dr. Donald Strobe.
Church School for all ages-9:30 a.m.
and 11a.m.
Choir Rehearsal-Thursday at 7:15
p.m..
Ministers:
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
*Rev. Fred B. Maitland
Dr. Gerald R. Parker
Education Directors: Rose McLean
and Carol Bennington

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
Serving the Campus for LC-MS
Robert Kavasch, Pastor
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
663-5560
Sunday Worship: 9:15 a.m. and 10:30
a.m.
Bible Class-9:15 a.m.
Wednesday Worship-9:00 p.m.
* *. *
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH
(The Campus Ministry of the ALC-
LCA)
Gordon Ward, Pastor
801 S. Forest at Hill St.
Sunday Worship Service at 10:30
Sun. 6:00 p.m. Potluck.
7:00 p.m. Hospice Program (all
Welcome).
Thurs. 7:30 p.m. L.O.L. Council
Meeting.
Wednesday 7:00 p.m. Choir Practice
* * *

wtv

WESLEY FOUNDATION
AT THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN

1 / (313) 668-6881
602 E. Huron atState
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104
A fellowship study and social issues
ministry for the university community.
TOM SCHOMAKER, Chaplain/Di-
rector.
ANN WILKINSON, Office Manager
This week's program:
Sat. Jan. 24, 9 A.M.-3 P.M. Economic
Conversion Conference in Wesley:
Lounge and Pine Room.
6:00 Shared Meal followed, by'
Toboggan and Sledding Party;
Thurs., Jan. 29, 7:30 P.M.
Peacemakers in Pine Room.
Support the
March of Dimes
BIRTH DEFECTS FOUNDATION

CHURCH OF SCIENTOLOGY
Huron Valley Mission
301 North Ingalls
(two blocks north of Rackham
Graduate School)
668-6113
Sunday Service-2:30 p.m.
Rev. Marian K. Kuhns
* * *
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron
Pastor, Jitsu Morikawa
,10:00 'a.m.-Morning Worship "The
Inaugural of Patriotism or Human
Rights."
11:00 a.m.-Sunday School (for all
ages).
'American Baptist Campus
Foundation"
All students and faculty are invited to
attend worship service at 10 a.m. in the
sanctuary and Sunday School Classes
at 11 a.m. in the Guild House.
Theology Discussion Group every
Thursday at 6 p.m.
(Complimentary brunch on second
Sunday of each month.)

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.-662-4466
(between S. University and Hill)
Campus Ministry Program
Campus Minister-Carl Badger
COLLEGE STUDENTS FELLOWSHIP
Activities: Sunday morning coffee
hour in between Services in the Social
Hall.
Bible Study on Tuesday evenings at
7:30 p.m. in the Founders room.
College Student's breakfast on Thurs-
day mornings at 8:00 a.m. in the
French room.
Worship ervices-Sunday, 9:30 a.m.
and 11 a.m.
UNIVERSITY CHURCH
OF THE NAZARENE
409 South Division
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Rev. Steve Bringardner, 761-5941
Christian Education-9:45 a.m.
Service of Worship-il1:00 a.m.
"Time of Meeting"-6:00 p.m.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw Ct.
A Campus Ministry of the Christian
Reformed Church
Rev. Don Postema, Pastor
10:00 a.m. Morning Worship: Rev.
Carl Geider guest speaker (From First
Presbyterian Church).
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
Evening Service of Holy Communion
Wednesday: 10:00 p.m. Evening
Prayers.
CHAPEL (Catholic)
331 Thompson-663-0557
Weekly Masses:+
Sat.-7:00 p.m.
Sun.-7:30 a.m., 9:00 a.m., 10:30 a.m.
(after 10:30 upstairs and downstairs)
12:00 noon, 5:00 p.m. (upstairs and
downstairs).
North Campus Mass at 9:30 a.m. in
Bursley Hall (Fall and Winter terms).
Rite of Reconciliation-4 p.m.-5 p.m.
on Friday only; any other time by ap-
pointment.

possible
budget cuts
Continued from Page 1
soccer, could "be cut in half," Steven-
son said.
HESAID HE also foresees substan-
tial reductions in intramural sports, no
matter what level of cuts are made.
Fall football; which had 275 teams par-
ticipating in 1980, might have' to restrict
its entries to 150 teams.
Stevenson presented these impact
statements to the Advisory Committee
on Recreational Sports, a year-round
group that oversees the department's
operations, on Jan. 16. He also will
present a similar analysis toaa new
committee created to review
recreational sports budget cuts.
Public Health Prof. Frizell Vaughan,
chairman of the University Budget
Priorities Committee subcommittee on
Recreational Sports, said his panel will
attempt to make a recommendation
that will "not jeopardize the program."
The committee will speak to represen-
tatives of the Recreational Sports
Department, the Intercollegiate
Athletic Department,tand the Physical
Education department.
VAUGHAN SAID open hearings with
students and staff wouldbe held in the
coming weeks.
The committee will look into the
possibility of the Intercollegiate
Athletic Department contributing some
money to the operation of recreational
sports, members said.
Intercollegiate sports use some of the
recreational sports facilities for
training, according to Bill Canning,
associate director of recreational spor-
ts. Currently, he said, intercollegiate
athletics-which operates on an in-
dependent budget-contributes nothing
to recreational sports.
Canning said he remains "very op-
timistic" that the budget committees
involved can be convinced to reduce the
proposed level of cuts. He said he
doesn't think "everyone realizes the
numbers we serve are so much greater
than any other department."
According to Stevenson, department
statistics show 74 percent of University
undergraduates and 40 percent of the
faculty use recreational sports
facilities.
The budget priorities subcommittee
will present its proposal to the entire
budget committee in late February, ac-
cording to student representative Kevin
Ireland. After that time, the Univer-
sity's academic affairs office and
executive officers will make final
decisions on the cuts.

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
South Korean president
spares arch-rival's lif e
SEOUL, South Korea-President Chun Doo-hwan spared the life of his ar-
ch political rival Kim Dae-jung yesterday, commuting his death sentence to
life imprisonment in a move expected to ease strained relations with the
United States.
The action was immediately applauded by the United States, Great
Britain, and Japan.
Chun also will end martial law today to provide a "free atmosphere" for
next month's presidential election, informed sources said. Kim had been ex-
pected to be the major opposition candidate in the election until his arrest
last May on charges of treason and sedition.
Calling Kim's case a "nightmare from the past," Chun noted in com-
muting the death sentence that "friendly nations and persons at home and
abroad have appealed for clemency from a humanitarian standpoint."
Alcohol consumption rate
for nation drops two-thirds
WASHINGTON-The increases in drinking in the United States slowed
down in the last few years, and nearly half the alcohol consumed was in the
form of beer, a government agency reported yesterday.
The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism said in its study
that consumption on the national level continued to rise during the 1970s at a
rate of eight percent in contrast to the 25 percent rate increase for the 1960s.
The per capita consumption rate for the typical adult in 1978-the last year
figures are available-was 2.73 gallons of pure alcohol.
Reagan names Weidenbaum to
Council of Economic Advisors
WASHINGTON-President Reagan conferred yesterday with Republican
congressional leaders over his upcoming economic program and named a
man who has long influenced his conservative fiscal views, Murray Weiden-
baum, to head the Council of Economic Advisers.
House Republican leader Bob Michel of Illinois told reporters the Social
Security program would not be endangered as ways are sought to cut federal
spending.
Reagan also placed several longtime supporters in key sub-Cabinet posts,
pending Senate confirmation. The list included William Clark, a California
Supreme Court justice, to replace Warren Christopher-the key U.S.
negotiator in the Iran hostage settlement-as deputy secretary of state.
Another victim found in
mysterious Atlanta slayings
CONYERS, Ga.-An electrician driving to work yesterday on a suburban
highway spotted the body of a teen-age boy, apparently the 14th victim in a
series of mysterious killings of black children in the Atlanta area.
Two weeks ago, Rockdale County officers searched a woods several hun-
dred yards from the spot where the body was found yesterday, a few feet
froni the road, after an anonymous caller said evidence linked to the child
deaths would be found there.
The search turned up nothing, but deputies went door-to-door in the next
few days warning parents not to let their children go anywhere alone.
Police said the body found yesterday was of a black youth who appeared to
be about 13 or 14 years old.
"This guy seemed to be neatly placed on his left side," said Mike Abbott,
who found the body at 7:25 a.m. about 50 yards from his home. "When I went
over to him, it didn't dawn on me that he was dead." Several other of the
slain children also were found without wounds, carefully placed near well-:
traveled thoroughfares.
Polish labor strikes continue
WARSAW, Poland-Polish workers yesterday staged a four-hour strike
which included 59 plants and officeN to demand a five-day workweek.
Despite government warnings that Poland's economy cannot afford
production losses, one million workers were exhorted to stay off the job
today to protest the government's proposal that only alternating Saturdays
be free until a five-day workweek is phased in.
The appeal for a coordinated, nationwide protest was the second this mon-
th by Solidarity, which emerged from last summer's sweeping labor
rebellion. The protests are aimed at forcing the Polish government to in-
plement agreements that ended last summer's nationwide labor unrest and
authorized the Soviet bloc's first unions independent of Communist Party
control.
Flu rages across country
ATLANTA-Deaths from influenza and pneumonia topped the 1,000 mark
for the second consecutive week with flu outbreaks reported in 37 states, the
national Centers for Disease Control said yesterday.
The number of deaths in 121 major U.S. cities attributed to the current
siege of influenza was above the so-called "epidemic threshold" for the sixth
consecutive week.
The CDC said most of the flu was being caused by a comparatively new

virus strain, A-Bangkok. Because of changes in its genetic structure, many
people resistant to previous types of the ailment have little natural im-
munity to the new strain. A protective vaccine is available but it was repor-
ted in short supply.
Vol. XCI, No. 98
Saturday, January 24, 1981
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
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i

0

"WHY DO THE HEATHEN RAGE?"
Psalms 2:1 and Acts 4:25

In a few instances, during our past 18 years of advertis-
ing these articles, scripture passages have been omitted.
These omissions have doubtless been unintentional.
However, the omissions provoked the following
thought: To a certain extent the omission cuts us off and
breaks contact with the "POWER HOUSE!" Hebrews 12:4
tells us "FOR IT IS THE WORD OF GOD THAT IS QUICK
AND POWERFUL!" This omission stirs us up to stress the
importance of The Christian's "SEARCHING THE SCRIP-
TURES" and laying up God's Word in his heart as we enter
another year.
The First recorded words spoken by Christ after His
baptism by John Baptist were: "MAN SHALL NOT LIVE
BY BREAD ALONE, BUT BY EVERY WORD THAT PRO.
CEEDETH OUT OF THE MOUTH OF GOD" - Matthew
and Luke 4:4, If you profess to be a Christian, in view of
this passage what has been your attitude and effort
towards getting familiar with "every word of God"; and
what is your intention regarding the effort in 1981 to "get
familiar with every Word of God."

The writer's Mother told him a story when he was about
seven years old. it thrilled me then, and it has thrilled me
many a time since, in fact every time I have heard it and
even now as I tell it. It concerned a man by the name of Dr.
Barnett who was Pastor of an Atlanta Church. He was on
a trip to Europe. A storm came up in the night and the
Captain ordered all the people awakened and to dress and
be prepared for the worst. The porter who awakened Dr.
Barnett reported he sat up a few moments, listened, but
said: "God is out there on the waters," laid down and went
back to sleep. "ALL THINGS ARE POSSIBLE TO THOSE
WHO BELIEVE!" "FAITH COMES BY HEARING, AND
HEARING COMES BY THE WORD OF GOD!" We have
God's Word, and God's Promises. Doubtless the trouble
with us is neglecting and omitting God's Word and giving
too much time to other things!
The following quote is from the late Billy Sunday,
spoken not many years after the invention of the flying
machine: "TO TEACH A CHILD TO LOVE THE TRUTH
AND HATE A LIE, TO LOVE PURITY AND HATE VICE, IS

Editor-in-Chief..........
Managing Editor.........
City Editor. .............
University Editors.
Features Editor.........
Opinion Page Editors.
Arts Editor ...............

..MARK PARRENT
.......MITCH CANTOR
PATRICIA HAGEN
TOMAS MIRGA
BETH ROSENBERG
-ADRIENNE LYONS
.JOSHUA PECK
HOWARD WITT
.........EANNE GADON
DENNIS HARVEY
.ALAN FANGER

Business Manager.
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Operations Manager .
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Co-Display Manager..
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Finance Manager....
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ROSEMARY WICKOWSKI
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. TERRY DEAN REDDING
E. ANDREW PETERSEN
Boer. Glenn Becker Joe

Sports Editor..

NEWS STAFF WRITERS. Arlyn Afremow Beth Allen,
Soro Anspach. Lorenzo Benet, Nancy Bilyeau. Doug
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Julie Engebrecht, Ann Marie Fazio,

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Forslund. Barb Fritz Jeff Gottheim. Eric Gutt Sue
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Hendrick. Nancy Joslin Peter Komin Catherine
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