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January 21, 1981 - Image 10

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-01-21

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SPORTS
Wednesday, January 21, 1981

P ge 10

The Michigan Daily,

- Wonu
By DAN NEWMAN
Diane Dietz pumped in a game-high
20 points to spark Michigan's women's
basketball team to a thrilling 63-61 vic-
tory over the Oakland Pioneers last
night at Crisler Arena.
-'Dietz did a really super job
t;fight," said coach Gloria Soluk, who
added that Tammie Sanders also
played a vital role in the Wolverines' at-
tack by contributing eight points and
eight rebounds off the bench.

DIETZ TOSSES IN 20

en cagers tip Oakland

'M' Olympian Bruce:
a dashing success

V i

THE LEAD see-sawed throughout the
second half, changing hands ten times.
Dietz, who scored ten points in each
period, hit a 15-foot jumper with 4:00
remaining to put the Wolverines ahead,
57-56. After the Pioneers' Linda
Krawford, who added 20 points and nine
rebounds in the losing cause, tied the
score at 59-59, Michigan's Sanders
responded by sinking a jumper that put
the Wolverines ahead for good. Diane
Hatch hit two free throws with nine

seconds remaining to secure the win.
"We didn't play as well as we should
have," said Soluk. "I think we were a
little flat because we were coming off
the loss to Detroit."
In the sloppily-played first half that
saw the two teams turn the ball over a
total of 26 times, the Pioneers jumped
in front by as many as seven points
before settling for a 34-31 halftime lead.
Krawford sparked two seven-point
spurts by nailing seven first-half field

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goals.
MICHIGAN'S 6-5 junior:, Patrice
Donovan, picked up her third foul later
in the period, thus enabling Oakland to
dominate the boards and the tempo of
the game. Teresa Vondraselk grabbed
eight rebounds, and Krawford added
five in those first 20 minutes.
But the Wolverines bounced back
quickly in the second half, jumping out
to a 35-34 lead. Sanders snatched five
second-half rebounds as the Wolverines
outboarded the Pioneers, 20-15, in the
second stanza.
Michigan's ball-hawking defense was
tenacious throughout the contest, for-
cing Oakland to commit 23 turnovers
while hitting on only 41 percent of its
floor shots.
"WE'RE NOT afraid of going to a
man-to-man defense any more," com-
mented Soluk, who was pleased with
her team's defensive effort.
Gnatkowski was the only other
Wolverine in double figures, con-
tributing eleven points. the team only
shot 44 percent, connecting on 26 of 59
from the floor.
The victory upped Michigan's overall
record to 6-9 and the Wolverines next
meet conference foe Indiana at home on
Friday.
"WE'RE HOPING to get a cohesive
lineup in there," said Soluk. "We've
been starting the same four or five
players the last few games."
Soluk can't help but look forward to
the Big Ten Tournament February 13-
14 at Northwestern. "The two toughest
teams are Minnesota and North-
western," said Soluk
Oakland raided

By JOE CHAPELLE

"When you walk into the stadium and see the people, you realize that this is the
big time. A type of spirit fills you. You run and do your best."
This is how Michigan sprinter Andrew Bruce describes the emotional charge
he felt prior to the semifinals of the 200-meter dash at the 1980 Moscow Olympic
Games. Bruce, who represented Trinidad at the Olympics, earned his spot in the
semifinals with a time of 20.94. "I think that reaching the semifinals in the Olym-
pies has been the highlight of my career so far," said Bruce on Monday.
Wolverine track coach Jack Harvey describes Bruce as "a runner of great
range who can run well in anything from the 60-yard dash to the quarter mile.
Bruce is probably the finest runner that we have ever had at Michigan."
Bruce certainly lives up to his coach's billing. Besides his outstanding perfor-.
mance in Moscow, Bruce placed second last year in the Central Collegiate Con-
ference meet in the 440-yard run and came in third in the Big Ten Outdoor Chary-
pionships as well, with a time of 20.98 in the 200-meter event. He also took second in6
the 60-yard dash with a time of 30.67 in the 1980 Big Ten Indoor Championships.
Bruce spent last summer running in various competitions throughout Europe
before the Olympics. "This could be his best year ever at Michigan due to the fact
that he was exposed to international competition," said Harvey. "He has more
confidence now than he did last year.

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The junior speedster is looking forward to Olympic competition again in
"I would really like to reach the
Los Angeles Olympics," said
Bruce. "I think that in '84 1 should
be contending for a medal. I
would be disappointed if I
weren't."
However, Bruce feels that run- .:. .
ners in the United States face two
big disadvantages in comparison
with athletes of other nations.
First, track meets simply do not
draw the large numbers of fans in
the United States that they do in
other parts of the world. Accor-
ding to Bruce, fan support is im-
portant to a runner and can affect
his performance. "When I star-
ted running track in 1976 in
Trinidad, I broke a couple of
records and ran in front of large
crowds ofenthusiastic fans, he
said. "I was a little disappointed
when I started running here
because of the small amount of Bruce
fans. It's a problem. I have to .. points to '84
concentrate one hundred percent
to do well here."

1984.
a.

OAKLAND
Minfg/a ft/a Reb.
Krawford ..............40 8/19 4/5 9

A

Vondrasels...........
Donner .............
Kish ................
Kenny ..............
Springer.............
Axsom ..............
McGraw ...............
Team rebounds.......
Totals.............

37
40
12

73/10 3/8 11
12/4 0/0 4
0 3/11 2/4 1
9 3/5 0/0 3
22/4 0/0 0
9 5/8 0/0 6.
'0/1 0 'n
2
26 /62 9/17 36

A
2
0
0
s
2
0
11

PF Pts.
1320
4 9
1 4
448
0 6
0 4
2 10
0 .0
12 61

MICHIGAN

r

Dietz ..............
Venhuizen ...,........
Donovan ...............
Gnatkowski ..........
htatch ..............
Neer .....
W~hite..........,.....
larte :..............
Sanders............
Curier ............
Soupiler............
Team rebounds.......
TOTALS .........,. .

mnfg/a ft/a Reb A PF Pts
37 0/190/0 4 3 1 20
23 1/3 3/4 5 1 2 5
2 3/6 2/2 4 0 4 8
.40 5/12 1/2 4 3 3 11
250/33/4 1 1 0 3
7 1/2 0/0 3 1 2 2
2 0/0 0/00 0 0 0
15. 2/5.I10/,02 4 2 4
18 3/5 2/28 1 1 8
9 1/40/0 4, 0 1 2
2 0/0 0/0 0 0 0 0
4
26/59 1/14 39 12 16 63

The second disadvantage that Bruce perceives for runners in the United States
is the lack of financial support for the track athlete. "It is hard to find a job which
will allow you the time needed for training," he said. He also pointed out that most
runners competing in the United States are in school, where they are supported by'
scholarships or grants.
Bruce, an LSA student, is' concentrating in radio and television com-~
munications. He planson attending graduate school upon finishing his -u
dergraduate work. He also has an intense interest in music. "I would like to get in-
volved with the mixing of popular music from different bands. Anything that pays
well," he added jokingly.
A gold medal pays well, doesn't it, Andrew?
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