100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 21, 1981 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-01-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

Some 'U' si
forward Itc

The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, January 21, 1981 -Page 9
tudents look
Reagan er
that Reagan is the new In their attempt to generate positrte
ite House. thoughts about the new president, the
RS, Adams said he was Collegiate Association for the Resea!t
out Reagan's image as a of Principles spent the day distributk
" He said that while the literature in the Fishbowl, asking-
iight strengthen the students to "give Reagan a chance."
not "looking for a war." "Reagan will give the opportunity but
graduate student Janeen without the people, it's useless," said
rently works as an intern CARP spokesman Ander Conradi.
Carl Pursell (R-Ann Ar- "We're just asking people to think twice
erday was a "celebration about it."
onerP..net."Ellis said

By BETH ALLEN
While many liberal University
students lamented the inauguration of
Ronald Reagan yesterday as the
nation's 40th president, students of a
different political bent expressed high
hopes for the incoming Republican ad-
ministration. Many of them said they
were optimistic that Reagan would
bring about some long-awaited
changes.
"There's no question that the next
four years will be better and exciting,"
said Michigan Student Assembly mem-
ber Bruce Brumberg. He said he an-
ticipates the Reagan presidency will
"provide new approaches" to the
problems that plagued the nation
during the Carter administration.
BRUMBERG ALSO said he expects
"dramatic changes" to occur in
American foreign policy during the
Reagan administration.
J.P. Adams, chairman of the Student
Alliance for Better Representation,
said he is "very optimistic about the
future."
Adams said his optimism "stems
from the, fact that it's a new ad-
ministration," and not necessarily

from the fact
man in the Wh
LIKE OTHE
concerned ab
"war monger.
president m
military, he is
Universityg
Ellis, who cur
for U.S. Rep.
bor), said yest
in more than

*III * t1 I.*flifl l t. * a . L111 .JbSlU
she was pleased by the return of the 52
American hostages from Iran, and was
"very pleased for the Republican par-
ty."
Ellis added she hoped Reagan would
become involved "with more of the
human issues."
LSA SENIOR Brad Canale, treasurer
of the Michigan Republican Club, said
he was "pleased that the day went so
well for both President Reagan and the
United States," and that he was "glad
the old class is back in Washington."
"I have no remorse at all-at seeing
Carter leave," said Canale, but he ad-
ded that Reagan can't do everything
alone. "If it's a joint effort it's going to
be a good four years," he said.

Support the
March of Dimes
BIRTH DEFECTS FOUNDAION

hr rnoto
FORMER PRESIDENT Gerald Ford passed up the inauguration to practice for a round of golf at the Doral Country
Club in Miami yesterday. Ford said he and his wife would stay in the background on Ronald Reagan's inaugural day.
R~egan plunges into
issues in first hours

f
/

j
'-'.4

(Continued from Page )
FREEDOM FOR the hostages
brought added joy for Republicans
elebrating their return from the .dep-
ths of the Watergate scandal to control
of not only the White House, but the
Senate as well.
Reagan's 20-minute inaugural ad-
dress was a firm restatement of his
campaign promises to slash taxes, trim
government spending, boost the
military and re-establish American;

and Jefferson and Lincoln, shining in
the 'sunlight of a mild January day.
Reagan called those men "the giants on
whose shoulders \We stand."
Police estimated that 400,000 people
lined the 16-block route of the inaugural
parade. There were clusters of demon-
strators among them, against draft
registration, against the Ku Klux Klan,
for the Equal Rights Amendment.
Reagan and his wife rode the

5-.
' ,,

'Let us renew our determination, our
courage, and our strength. Let us renew
our faith and our hope. We have every
-.right to dream heroic dreams.'
-President Reagan

, ,..a

;pre-eminence in thewrld.
"We must act today in order to
;preserve tomorrow," he said. "And let
there be no misunderstanding-we are
going to act beginning today."
"LET US BEGIN an era of national
-:renewal," Reagan said. "Let us renew
our determination, our courage, and
-our strength. Let us renew our faith and
-our hope. We have every right to.
dream heroic dreams."
A crowd estimated at 70,000 people
watched the rite at the West Front of
the Capitol, the monuments of
American government, of Washington

ceremonial route of presidents, down
Pennsylvania Avenue at the head of
their own parade, standing to wave
from the openwroof of a black limousine.
At dusk, as the inaugural parade en-
ded and the Mormon Tabernacle Choir
sang "The Battle Hymn of the
Republic," Reagan waved from his
"reviewing stand, brushed away a tear,
then walked with his wife down the
driveway to his new home in the White
House.

W

.}
Y'
r
.
a ,-

,""Ij

I.

I

N

THE

MOR

N

I

N

G

ANN ARBOR'S ONLY MORNING NEWS-
PAPER. DELIVERS TO YOUR DORM OR
DOOR BEFORE 8:00AM TUESDAY-SUNDAY
CAlL TODAY TOSIURSCRIRF. 764-0558 OR

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan