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December 11, 1981 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-12-11

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Page 2-F
D ivided H
WASHINGTON (AP)- A deeply divided House
pased 218 to 197 yesterday a Republican-backed plan
to gve President Reagan $4 billion in additional
spengding cuts from domestic programs this fiscal
year.
The final vote came only moments after the cham-
ber, on a tally of 2 2 to 194, dumped an alternative
Democratic proposal that would have made $3 billion
in cuts in the huge, catch-all bill to keep the federal
government from running out of money on Dec. 15.
'HIRTY-SIX Democrats joined 186 Republicans in
rejecting the Democratic plan. Only three GOP
merpbers supported it.
The Senate began debate on the measure a few
hours later, and Republicans said they would use
their majority there to force approval.
House Republicans said Reagan would sign the bill,
afte- warning in advance the president would cast a'
veto if it didn't give him the full $4 billion in additional
reductions.
"THE PRESIDENT means what he says," said
Rep. Silvio Conte of Massachusetts, the top-ranking
Republican on the House Appropriations Committee.
I-

riday, December 11, 1981-The Michigan Daily
ouse OKs budget plan

"We will be here on Christmas Eve angry and
frustrated," he said, raising the specter of repeating
the confrontation last month in which Reagan vetoed
one bill, the government went broke for a day and the
president ordered much of it to shut down.
That impasse was temporarily resolved with
passage of an emergency bill which expires at mid-
night Tuesday. The new measure would expire on
March 31, or halfway through the 1982 fiscal year.
UNDER THE plan hundreds of domestic programs
would be cut by four percent. There would be no ad-
ditional cuts in defense, payments for recipients of
Social Security, food stamps and similar benefit
programs, medical care for veterans, revenue
sharing, law enforcement activities, and the
judiciary.I
But nearly $500 million of the $4 billion in cuts
would come from administrative accounts for Social
Security, Medicaid, and unemployment insurance,
and Republicans conceded those savings might
evaporate later in the year if expenses are higher
than expected.
In a jab at the latest deficit estimates from the ad-

ministration, Conte said the disagreement over $1
billion or so meant that "Instead of having a deficit of
$109 billion you'd have a deficit of $107.5 billion."
LATER THE House, in a largely pro-forma action,
voted 206-200 to approve a 1982 budget outline iden-
tical to one the Senate passed Wednesday. The
president's signature is not required.
The measure parallels the temporary spending
outline Congress adopted in the spring. It amounts to
a holding action until Reagan can submit his new tax
and spending proposals in January, but it is required
so that Congress can adjourn for the year.
Included in the outline is language demanding that
the president submit a revised plan "as soon as
possible" to balance the 1984 budget as well as bring
down inflation, interest rates, and unemployment.
Under the stopgap spending plan hundreds of
domestic programs would be cut by four percent.
There would be no additional cuts in defense,
payments for recipients of Social Security, food
stamps and similar benefit programs, medical care
for veterans, revenue sharing, law enforcement ac-
tivities, and the judiciary.

1'

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Design class
added-for
art students
(Continued from Page 1)
come, first-served basis, and students
often fight over their position in the
scheduling line, Weisenberger said.
Competition among students to
register for classes even leads to over-
night camp-outs, Weiseriberger added.
"They're trying to discourage us
from camping out, but the registration
procedure forces us to do it," Weisen-
berger said.
"There is a limited space in the
classes that many people want,"
Weisenberger said. "I've had to fight
since I was a freshman to get classes."

Y

IN BRIEF
Complied from Associated Press and
United Press international reports
Alaska pipeline package
sent to White'House
WASHINGTON - A special financing package for the $43-billion Alaska
natural gas pipeline, described as the world's largest private construction
project, was sent to the White House yesterday after supporters swept aside
legal andpolicy objections.
The 230-188vote was the second time in two days the House was forced to
act on the same measure.
The original vote was caught in a legal snarl that opponents say leaves a
cloud over financing arrangements. They say the second vote violated the
special law Congress enacted in 1976 to govern pipeline decisions.
FBI opens new investigation
of L abor Secretary Donovan
WASHINGTON - The FBI has opened an investigation of Labor Secre-
tary Raymond Donovan following new allegations about his actions as head
of a New Jersey construction company, it was disclosed yesterday.
Law enforcement officials, who declined to be identified, termed the
inquiry a "preliminary investigation" and declined to outline the allegations
that prompted the FBI's renewed interest in Donovan.
David Gergen, White House communications director, told reporters At-
torney General William French Smith had informed Reagan Dec. 3 "that
such an inquiry was being undertaken."
OPEC ministers fail
to resolve pricing dispute
ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates - OPEC oil ministers failed
yesterday to resolve a pricing dispute over premiums - the differentials
that allow producers to charge more than the cartel's base price of $34 per
barrel.
When the session broke up just before midnight, the United Arab
Emirates oil minister, Mana Saeed Oteiba, told reporters the 13 oil ministers
would meet again today to continue the discussion of differentials. The con-
ference had been scheduled to end last night.
The base price of $34 a barrel was decreed in October when the
Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries met in Geneva, Switzerland.
Fired air controllers
now eligible for military
WASHINGTON - The Pentagon said yesterday fired air traffic con-
trollers, out of a job for the past four months, may now enlist in the military
if any of the once highly paid civilians want the lower-paying jobs.
Reversing a policy handed down Nov. 5, the Defense Department said
controllers "may be enlisted or re-enlisted in the armed forces if they other-
wise peet applicable standards." The Nov. 5 order is "rescinded," said
Lawrence Korb, assistant defense secretary for manpower.
The ban was lifted as of Wednesday.
House committee completes
worker's compensation bill
LANSING - The House Labor Committee yesterday completed work on
a 12-bill Senate-passed package of worker's compensation reform bills, sen-
ding the remaining measures to the full House for action.
The committee approved six major bills yesterday - nearly all on
straight party-line votes, with Republicans opposing committee changes -
after approving six less controversial measures on Wednesday.
In most cases, the committee amended the bills to conform with a
package of measures approved last week by the House. The House bills are
generally considered to be less favorable to business than the original Senate
measures.
Vol. XCII, No.76
Friday, December 11, 1981
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The Univer-
sity of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during
the University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 49109. Sub-
scription rates: $12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail out-
side Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday mor-
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Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER: Send
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News room: (313) 764.0552; 76-DAILY, Sports desk, 764-0562; Circulation, 764-0558; Classified Advertising,
764-0557; Display advertising, 764-0554; Billing..764-0550..

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Editor-in-thief..................SARA ANSPACH
Managing Editor..............JUIE ENGEBRECHT
University Editor .:. .............. LORENZO GENET
News Editor .. DAVID MEYER
Opinion Page Editors..........CHARLES THOMSON
KEVIN TOTTIS
Sports Editor .................. MARK MIHANOVIC
Associate Sports Editors............ GREG DeGULIS
MARK FISCHER
BURDY MOOREHOUSE
DREW SHARP
Chief Photographer............PAUL ENGSTROM
PHOTOGRAPHERS-Jackie Bell. Kim Hill. Deborah
Lewis, Mike Lucas. Brion Mosck.
ARTISTS: Robert Lence. Jonathan Stewart. Richard
Walk. Norm Christiansen.
ARTS STAFF: Richard Campbell, Jane Carl, James Clin-
ton, Mark Dighton, Michael Huget, Adam Knee, Pam
Kromer. Gail Negbour, Carol Ponenon, RJ Smith, Ben
Ticho.
'NEWS STAFF: John Adam, Beth Allen, Julie Barth,
And,ew Chapman. Lisd Crumrine, Ann Marie Fozio.
Pam Fickinger, Joyce Frieden. Mark Gindin, Julie Hin-
ds Steve Hook. Kothlyn Hoover. Horlan Kahn. Mincy
Layne. Mike McIntyre. Jennifer Miller. Dan Oberrot-
man, Stacy Powell. Janet Roe. David Spok. Fannie
Weinstein. Barry Witt.

SPORTS STAFF: Barb Barker, Jesse Barkin, Tam Ben-
tley, Randy Berger, Mark Borowski, Joe Chapelle,
Laura Clark, Martha Crall Jim Dworman, Karen Floch,
Larry Frped, Matt Henehan, Chuck Jaffe, John Kerr,
Doug Levy. Jim Lombard, Larry Mishkin, Dan
Newman, Andrew Oakes, Ron Pollack, Jeff
Quicksilver, Sarah Sherber, Kenny Shore. James
Thompson, Josie VonVoigtionder, Kent Walley, Karl
Wheatley, Chris Wilson, Bob Woinowski.
BUSINESS STAFF
Business ManagerE.... A.........RANDI CIGELNIK
Sles Manager..................BARB FORSLUND
Operations manager ............. SUSANNE KELLY
Display Manager..........MARY ANN MISILWICZ
Classifieds Manager............. DENISE SULLIVAty
Finance Manager ...............MICHAEL YORICK
Assistant Display Manager.........NANCY JOSLIN
Nationals Manager............SUSAN RABUSHKA
Circulation Manager ................. KIM' WOODS
Sales Coordinator...........E. ANDREW PETERSEN
BUSINESS STAFF: Liz Altman, Hope Barron, Alan Blum.
Daniel Bowen, Lindsay Bray. Joseph Broda, Glen Can-
tor, Alexander DePiilis. Susan Epps. Wendy Fox,
Sebastian Frcko, Mark Freeman. Morci Gittelman.
Pamela Gould. Kathryn Hendrick, Anthony Ildterronte.
Indre Liutkus, Beth Kovinsky, Caryn Notiss, Felice
Oper, Jodi Pollock, Ann Sachar, Michael So.itt,
Michael Seltzer. Karen Silverstein, Sam Slaughter,
Nancy Thompson, Jeffrey Voight.

"

NEW KROGER PLAZA

PUBLICATION SCHEDULE
1981
S TTFS S MTW T FS SM TW T FS S MT WTF S
SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER
---4G1 2 3 113-4 567 1 23'4 5
101112 4 6 7 8 9 10 8 1011121314 8 9 101112
3115617 1819 11 k13 14 1516 17 151w1718 79 20 21 f
27 29 30 25 ~627 28 29 30 31 f
202 3 24 25 26 18492021 22 2324 224324 25 R&-.627'8-9R3#3
1982
JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH 1 APRj
SMTwT F S SM T W T F S SM T W T F S S M T W T F S

434-0134

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