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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 06, 1981 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-12-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE

By Don Rubin

PUZZLEP
Punchy

The Michigan Daily-Sunday, December 6, 1981-Page 5
Business grads
reap higher pay

Maybe we've been in this busi-
ness too long, but it occurred
to us that a standard office
paper punch actually keeps a
record of everything that goes
through it.
Using the "holes" at the
right, see if you can list the
items we've perforated on the
. ah, punch lines below.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.

r

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V.3

~juy

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'.0)
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av

From AP and staff reports
PHILADELPHIA - Despite a
recession and growing unemployment,
competition for top business school
graduates has heated up and em-
ployment bonuses are now offered
frequently, reports the Wharton School.
In addition, the average starting
salary for the most recent class of
Wharton graduates with master's
degrees in business administration was
at an all-time high of $30,200, up 13.4
percent from 1980's $28,100, the Univer-
sity of Pennsylvania business school
reported yesterday in its preliminary
salary survey.
"Salaries have finally broken the
$30,000 barrier, and that brings them to
a new plateau," said Arthur Letcher,
Wharton's assistant dean for corporate
relations. "In the $30,000 range, MBA
graduates are no longer put into entry
level positions. The graduates who get
these higher salaries are the ones who
come to us with some experience, and
they are expected to be productive im-
FLORIDA VACATION
ONLY $8.9511!*
So you and your friend
can't go to Florida for Christmas?
We can send Florida to you.
FLORIDA pAC AGE INCLUDES
0 Sand (Clearwaeeacmr ea
* Shells ! al a
Spostcrd Sunglasses
AVACATION FOR YOA OTHRHISMAT
FOR YOUR FRIEND
'Pius $1 o(3pos e oaie a nd jr
, Send amounu .plsposageand Ghandng cmrgF e o
Andersn o4814 Flamngao RoaidTompo Florida33609Q

mediately in their new positions."
Overall, starting salaries for mem-
bers of Wharton's most recent
graduating class ranged from $18,000 to
$52,000, with a mean of $32,000. Last
year's overall range was $17,000 to
$50,000.
Dean Gilbert Whitaker of the Univer-
sity's School of Business Ad-
ministration said there are more
companies recruiting this year than
last." He added companies are not cut-
ting down on recruiting, but instead are
"preparing for when the economy turns
around."
375 N MAPLE
769-1300
S$22TO600PM *
..Two ours o
n stop th:lls
O ASTARAMOUNT
"" TIME'PEN
BANDITS 7t
" 9 40

Affilk
zm.

~*EU~Z

Send your completed puzzle to the
Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard, Ann Ar-
bor, MI 48109 by Wednesday of next
week. One person will be selected at
Random from the correct entries to win
a free Michigan Daily T-shirt.

7i, 140
.

0 7 I
\ hAND
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." .. ~

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Fed up with these crazy puzzles?
Would you like to get even with Don
Rubin and win $10 to boot? Then
send your original ideas for The
Puzzle to The Michigan Daily, 420
Maynard St., Ann Arbor, 48109.
All entries will become the property
of United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
(You only win the big bucks if we
use your puzzle idea.)

Q 1981 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.

LAST WEEK'S ANSWER:
Windows 1 and 2 (which were ac-
tually a pair of sliding glass doors)
generally account for most of the
errors. The poster in the kitchen, in-
cidentally, was a picture of a scene
outside.
We'll accept two solutions:
Left to right as viewed from
the basement:
6-4-3-5-8-2-1-7-9

Left to right as viewed from the
attic.
6-9-7-1-2-8-5-3-4
The following people answered
last week's puzzle correctly:
Peter Greenquist Philip Proefrock
Michael Mabry Michael Rafeld
Peter Meitzler Paulette Lucina
Vicki Neff Laird Bloom
James Rathuppf Sue Deziel
Kirk Hornburg Suzi Weidenthal

Thomas Gally
Steve Hirtle
Barbara Pearlman
Karen Wigen
Bethany Hodges
Stanley Pollack

David Kluge
Chris Wood
Susan Heath

U-Cellar, Union closer to home

(Continued from Page 1)

may be sold in the store because that
would place them in competition with a
Union-run shop already selling the
items.
ACCORDING TO Caballero and
Richard Barr, head of the store's finan-
ce committee, most student bookstores
nationwide make the majority of their
profit through the sale of insignia
items, allowing them to keep costs for
other items down.
But, with the increased rental rate
and the overhead created by, the
renovation costs, U-Cellar directors
said it is more vital than ever that the
store either be allowed to sell insignia
items, or that a non-competition clause
be included in their lease to protect
their market within the Union.

'A rapid slide into bankruptcy ap-
pears inevitable, with the consequent
loss of equity. '-Prof. Frederick Beutler

"Since we're on such a tight budget
right now, losing 1 percent of our sales
is very critical," Barr said.
"IT KIND OF scared us when (Cian-
ciola) said he planned to open a variety
store that would sell some things
similar to ours," Caballero said.
"Under the wording that was presen-
ted to us, it (a non-competition clause)
was not acceptable," Cianciola said.
"We're trying to work out something

that could work for both sides. 'We're
working toward creating a marketing
mix downstairs."
Barr said store officials offered to
purchase the right to sell insignia items
in competition with the Union, but that,
their offer had been turned down.
"I don't know if that was an out-and-
out commitment," Cianciola said.
"We're dealing with a number of con-

versatioris from a number of different
people. All we can deal with is what is
said when we actually sit down together
to discuss the situation."
The question of rent increases over
the five-year term of the lease is also
blocking immediate agreement.
"We are trying to work out an
equitable formula that would reflect
rate increases, such as utilities, that
are part of running a business," Cian-
ciola said. "There's no current in-
dependent formula for judging
something like that."
Cellar officials are similarly op-
timistic that agreement in this area
could be reached soon.
"We just don't feel we can sign an
open-ended agreement," U-Cellar
manager Bob Carlson said.

Stress a common-and necessary-problem

(Continued from Page 1)
Some suggestions made were to keep
a daily "to-do" list and calendar and to
begin activities by organizing them. To
avoid last-minute anxiety, workshop
leaders suggested dividing large tasks
into daily activities, noticing what is
being procrastinated, doing that first,
and allowing for extra time.
Leaders also demonstrated
techniques-such as muscle relaxation,
thought stoppage, and visual
imagery-for those who experience
physical rather than mental stress.

FEEDBACK ON the workshops has
been positive, according to Morson and
Gilbertson. "I see the workshops ser-
ving a function similar to school.
They're educational and by learning a
few skills and techniques, you can bet-
ter handle the human resources of time
and energy," Gilbertson said.
LSA freshwoman Bradley Gaskin;
said she went to the workshop because
she was worried about final exams. "I
knew finals were gonna throw me off
and I wanted to go and learn some new

techniques for relaxing," said Gaskins,
who said she has trouble with her vision
before big exams.
"I'm gonna try and use some of the
techniques they brought up," LSA
Honors freshwoman Maya Bernstein
said. "A couple of days before I have a
lot of work to do I have this feeling that
I'm not going to get it done or am going
to do it lousy," she said. "I'm a terrible
procrastinator. I'll go talk to friends or
eat. I even rearrange the clothes in my
closet or clean-up."

Bernstein also confirmed Morson's
view that isolation causes greater
stress. "It helped to know that there
are a lot of other people in the same
situation."

You'll Have Fun
Working on The Daily!
Dec. 4,5,6
- a9 Cpl . _ r hd-n £, C

SPECIAL EDITION
Tuesday, Dec.8
FEATURING
Dave Couwlier

J)--PUniversity Club,

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