100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 24, 1981 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-10-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 2-Saturday, October 24, 1981-The Michigan Daily
EPA ranks waste sites

WASHINGTON (AP) - The gover-
nment' ranked 114 hazardous waste
sites as the worst in the country yester-
day in the first stage of a $1.6 billion
assault against poisonous chemicals
that threaten the public health and en;
vironment.
The list, prepared by the Environ-
mental Protection Agency, will be used
to disburse federal money under the
Superfund program established by
Congrss last year to clean up dangerous
waste dumps.
THIRTY-NINE states placed sites
on the list, which was compiled from a
group of 282 sites nominated last sum-
mer by the states and EPA regional of-
fices.
.The dumps were rated for their
potential danger to public health-
primarily to drinking water supplies.
Also taken into consideration were
threats to the environment.
The sites were ranked in groups of 10
in descending order of the perceived
hazards. The country's best known
chemical dump, the Love Canal in New

Federal funds to, clean
chemical dump areas

York, was in the third group of 10.
OFFICIALS SAID 20 sites were listed
higher than Love Canal, where hun-
dreds of families were forced to leave
their homes, because they presented
greater potential threats to larger
populations.
Typical of those threats was an 81-
year-old industrial complex in Tacoma,
Wash., where the EPA said part of the
city's underground drinking water sup-
ply had been contaminated by leaking
chemicals. The Tacoma dump complex
was listed among the worst 10 dumps.
New Jersey and Massachusetts
placed two dumps each in the worst 10
list. New Hampshire, Pennsylvania,
New York, Oklahoma, and

Delaware hadone each among the wor-
st 10.
THE RANKING presented a dismal
inventory of rusting barrels of poisons
left abandoned and inadequate safety
measures being used at dumps that are
still operating.
The problems cited ranged from
30,000 gallons of polychlorinated
biphenyls spilled along roadsidesin 14
North Carolina counties to 17,000
rusting drums of toxic wastes at the
Valley of the Drums site in Brooks, Ky.
The state with the most dangerous
dumps among the 114 was Florida with
16. Officials said the state's high
groundwater table and large population
areas led to increased threats. Florida

cities listed with problem dumps in-
cluded Miami, Fort Lauderdale and
Tampa.
INDUSTRIAL New Jersey was next
with 12 sites, followed by New York and
Pennsylvania with eight each.
EPA officials estimated the Super-
fund will cover cleanup costs at 170
sites, at a projected cost of $5.5 million
each. The Superfund law requires 400
sites to be listed as candidates for
cleanup. EPA ',officials said they
hoped to help clean up the 230 sites that
won't get federal money by pressuring
owners.
The list of 400 sites will be published
in the spring, officials said. All 39.
states which submitted candidates for
the priority list released Friday placed
at least one dump on the list.
Officials said the 11 states that did not
make application to be on the initial list
will be considered for the second.
States with no dumps on the list re
Alaska, Hawaii, Idaho, Louisiana, Mon-
tana, Nebraska, Nevada, Vermont,
Oregon, Wisconsin and Wyoming.

Federal 'Sit to aid

IN BRIEF
Complied from Associated Press and
United Press international reports
Consumer Price Index hits
14.8 percent last month
WASHINGTON- Inflation surged in September, pushing the Consumer
Price Index to a 14.8 percent annual rate despite tight money policy and a
weak economy, the government reported yesterday.
Housing costs, college tuition, used cars and medical care led the index
upward.
The Labor Department said its 14.8 percent annual rate was compounded
from a monthly 1.2 percent increase for September, compared to August's
0.8 percent rise. July's 1.2 percent increase ended a four-month string of
considerably lower readings.
All figures were seasonally adjusted.
Union sues state to keep
Taylor schools open
DETROIT- The Michigan Federation of Teachers filed a lawsuit yester-
day aimed at forcing the state of Michigan to come up with the money to
keep the Taylor school district from closing as planfied next month.
MFT President Hugh Jarvis said the state has the constitutional obligation
to provide public education,reven in districts like Taylor where voters have
refused to approve their share of the tax burden.
Taylor voters this week rejected for the fourth time a millage proposal to
wipe out a $16 million deficit. School officials said they would close the
system Nov. 13, idling 16,000 students in the state's 10th largest district.
The school board is expected to schedule another election, possibly on Dec.
3.
Regan adminmsration aband
andator auto safety restraints
WASHINGTON- The Reagan 'administration abandoned yesterday a
requirement that carmakers install air bags or automatic seat belts, star-
ting with theirlarger 1983 models.
Raymond Peck, the Transportation Department's top auto-safety official,
said the rule was rescinded because the administration believes motorists
would circumvent automatic restraints as much as they do the presently
required manual seat belts.
The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety called the decision a
"tragedy" on grounds that it "condemns to utterly needless death tens of
thousands of Americans who will be in car crashes just in the coming
decade, and whose lives could be saved by crash protection."
Greek movie, song censorship
ends
ATHENS, Greece- Greece's new Socialist government endeddgover-
nment censorship of movies and songs yesterday and began drafting
legislation to recognize leftists groups that fought against the Nazis in World
War II. It also imposed price controls on raw materials.
The government of Premier Andreas Papandreou, whose Panhellenic
Socialist Movement swept into power in Sunday's general elections, began
im lementing the new measures on its second full working day.
The.decision to lift censorship is expected to lead to greater freedom, but it
will not mean unrestricted screening of pornographic films. Under Greek
law a public prosecutor may intervene when there are considerations of
public morality at stake.

4

in c}lean-uj
LANSING (UPI)- Officials said Friday approval
of aid from the federal "Superfund" will enable them'
to defuse Michigan's most dangerous environmental
time bomb-the PBB-laden Gratiot County landfill.
"This is the No. 1 priority of the state and it needs to
be cleaned up," said William Rustem, Gov. William
Milliken's chief environmental aide.
THE GRATIOT County site, which contains about
80 tons of the toxic fire retardant, was one of 114 ap-
proved for' funding in a decision announced by the
Environmental Protection Agency.
The plan to entomb the landfill in clay is expected
to cost about $5.3 million, with work beginning as
soon as next summer. Details of state, local and
federal contributions to the project have yet to be
worked out.
The landfill was at thetop of a list of contamination
sites submitted to the EPA by Michigan officials for

0 o state PBB site,
Superfund aid: but was the only one to receive it. digging up contaminated soil and placing it in the
THE LANDFILL IS located near the site of the dump, is expected to cost about $5 million. Another
defunct Michigan Chemical Co. plant which once $=0,000 would be spent during the second phase of the
produced PBB. The chemical was mistakenly mixed cleanup which would involve removing water from
with cattle feed in 1973 and eventually contaminated the sealed-up dump to create pressure expected to in-
much of the state's population. sure against leaks.
Groundwater at and near the site already has been "The engineering plans call for putting up walls in
contaminated, due to a leak in the landfill's existing essence around the site so you wind up with a tomb
liner. which is a very accepted means of taking care of
While the chemical has not yet traveled very far, hazardous materials," Rustem said. He said in-
officials are afraid the potential is there for wider cineration, which has been suggested by others as a
contamination unless action is taken. cure, was considered.
ALREADY, THE Public Health and Natural Rep. Donald Albosta (D-Mich.), who worked to ob-
Resources departments have warned hunters against tain Superfund support for the project in his district,
eating certain types of small game taken within the said the EPA announcement places the state "one
vicinity of the dump. step closer to permanently solving the problem this
A plan already worked out calls for installing a clay contamination has caused in Gratiot County."
bottom and cap on the landfill. This, along with

1

0

(gI~urdi Ulnrolip *rucn

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
120 S. State St.
(Corner of State and Hurdn)
Worship Schedule:
8:30 a.m.-Holy Communion in the
Chapel.
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Morning Wor-
ship in the Sanctuary.
Sermon for Oct. 25-"The Last Day
In October," by Rev. Fred B.- Maitland.
Church School for all ages-9:30 a.m.
and 11 a.m.
Choir Rehearsal-Thursday at 7:15
p.m.
Ministers:
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
Rev. Fred B. Maitland
Dr. Gerald R. Parker -
Education Directors:.
Rose McLean and Carol Bennington
UNIVERSAL LIFE CHURCH
"The Mystical Church"
Pastor Stanley Zurawski, 434-7445
Sunday 11:00 a.m. Meditation. Sub-
ject: New World Religion.
Classes: Mon. Evening 8:00
p.m.-"Discipleship in the New Age."
-Wed. Evening 7:30
p.m.-"Ministerial Training for the
New Age." (Inquiries Welcome).
Ordained minister available for any
ministerial or priestly function.
For further information, call 434-7445.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH and
AMERICAN BAPTIST CAMPUS
FOUNDATION
502 East Huron 663-9376
Jitsuo Morikawa, Pastor
10:00 a.m.-Sunday Worship. Child
care provided.
Oct. 25: "Not For Myself Alone" by'
Dr. Robert Bellah.
11:00 a.m.-Church School. Classes
for all ages. Class for undergraduates.
Class for graduates and faculty.
Also:
Choir Thursday 7:00 p.m., John Reed
director; Janice Beck, organist.
Student Study Group. Thurs., 6:00
p.m.
Support group for bereaved students,
alternate Weds. 7p.m.
11:00 Brunch, second Sunday of each
month.
Ministry Assistants: Nadean Bishop,
Terry Ging, Barbara Griffin, Jerry'
Rees.
* .
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
Serving the Campus for 39 Years
Robert Kavasch, Pastor
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
663-5560
Sunday Worship 9:15 and 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Supper: 6:00 p.m.
Bible Study: Sunday-9:15 a.m.,
Wednesday-10 p.m., Thursday-10
p.m.
Wed. Choir Rehearsal 7:45 p.m.

ST. MARY'S
STUDENT CHAPEL
(Catholic)
331 Thompson-663-0557
Weekly Masses:
Mon.-Wed.-5:10 p.m.
Thurs.-Fri.-12:10 p.m.
Sat.-7:00 p.m.
Sun.-8:30 and 10:30 a.m. (Upstairs
and downstairs)
12 noon and 5 p.m. (upstairs and
downstairs)
North Campus Mass at 9:30 a.m. in
Bursley Hall (Fall and Winter Terms)
Rite of Reconciliation-4 p.m.-5 p.m.
on Friday only; any other time by ap-
pointment.
ANN ARBOR MISSIONARY CHURCH
2118 Saline-Ann Arbor Rd. 668-6640
Rev. Marvin L. Claasen, Pastor
10:00 a.m. Sunday School
11 a.m. & 6p.m. Worship Service
7:00 p.m. Wed. Bible Study & Prayer
A Cordial Welcome to All
* * *
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
(The Campus Ministry
of the LCa-ALC-AELC)
Gordon Ward, Pastor
801 S. Forest at Hill St.
Sunday Worship at 10:30 a.m.
Tuesday 7:30 p.m. Bible Study.
Wednesday 7:00 p.m. Choir practice.
* * *
NEW GRACE APOSTOLIC CHURCH
632 N. Fourth Ave.
Rev. Avery Dumas Jr., Pastor
9:45a.m. Sunday School.
11:45 Morning Worship
7:00 p.m. Evening Service.
Bible Study-Wed. & Fri. 7 p.m.
For rides call 761-1530
CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw Ct.
A Campus Ministry of the
Christian Reformed Church
Rev. Don Postema, Pastor
10:00 a.m. Morning Worship.
6:00p.m. Evening Worship.
Wednesday: 10:00 p.m. Evening
Prayers.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.-662-4466
Service of Worship:
Sunday 9:30 and 11:00 a.m.
Student Fellowship meets at 5:30
p.m.,
Wednesday: Bible Study, 8:45 p.m.

Military
uni~ts used
to halt.
Polis nrote
(Continued from Page 1)
officers and seasoned soldiers with
more than two years' service, would
help improve the supply of food to
markets, facilitate transport of goods,
combat waste and mismanagement and
solve local disputes.
"An extraordinary situation requires
extraordinary measures," Urban said.
"Intensification of destructive excesses
is leading directly to the obliteration of
all the achievements of socialist
renewal." s
THE TERM RENEWAL is used by
both the, government and Solidarity to
describe the reforms gained during
past 14 months of strike and protests.
Urban suggested that the current round
of strikes was endangering the progress
toward democracy.
Urban reported that some members
of the government Presidium charged
during the meeting that Solidarity
members were seeking confrontation
and were not hiding a desire to stage a
coup.
The Solidarity leaders' meeting in.
Gdansk yesterday blamed Jaruzelski's
regime for food shortages, police
harassment and the "crisis in every
field," and said "the irresponsible
behavior of the authorities could lead to
a national catastrophe."
UNION SOURCES said Lech Walesa,
Solidarity's moderate leader, planned
to meet with Jaruzelski to discuss ways
of saving Poland from violent confron-
tation.
The party daily, Trybuna Ludu, said,
"People whom we used to call ex-
tremists have gone on to spectacular
and provocative activities. Poland in-
creasingly resembles a boiler, boiling
so hard that it is about to explode."'
It said people in food shops were so
angry over shortages they were
"behaving in a vulgar way, and there
were some cases of fighting and
beating."
LABOR UNREST, primarily over
food shortages and government
economic policies, gripped 36 of Poland's
49 provinces. Some 150,000 workers in
western Zielona Gora stayed off the job
for a second day, and 12,000 women
workers occupied textile plants in
Zyrardow for an 11th day.
Workers also struck steel mills,
mines and factories in the sulphur-

0

Vol. XCII, Na 39
Saturday, October 24, 1981
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109. Sub-
scription rates: $12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail
outside Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday
mornings. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7 by mail, outside Ann
Arbor. Second, class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109.
The Michigan Daily is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to United Press International,
Pacific News Service. Los Angeles Times Syndicate and Field Newspapers Syndicate.
News room: (313) 764.0552. 76-DAILY. Sports desk. 764-0562. Circulation. 764.0558. Classified advertising
764.0557. Display advertising, 764-0554. Billing 764-0550.

'WHY DO THE HEATHEN RAGE?'
Psalm 2:1 and Acts 4:25
In the second Psalm of the Bible God asks the above question, and then
answers it. He tells who the heathen are, why they rage, and His reaction and
consequences of their rage.
Usually we think of the heathen as savages or uncivilized people, but here
God names them as kings, rulers, people who imagine a vain thing, and rage
and rebel against His Government, His King, Laws and Commandments.
Such folks certainly do not believe in the God of the Bible. Webster says a
heathen is "one who does not believe in the God of the Bible." Our govern-
ment and rulers have rejected God's Book and the Lord's prayer for our
schools.
Psalm 22:28 tells us "GOD IS THE GOVERNOR AMONG THE NATIONS."
Hear this governor's orders: "AND THOU SHALT TEACH THEM (God's law)
DILIGENTLY UNTO THY CHILDREN, AND SHALT TALK OF THEM WHEN
THOU SITTEST IN THINE HOUSE, AND WHEN THOU WALKEST BY THE
WAY, AND. WHEN THOU LIEST DOWN, AND WHEN THOU RISEST UP -
THAT IT MAY GO WELL WITH THEM, AND THY CHILDREN AFTER THEE."
Deut. 6:7 and 12:25.
Our forefathers put God's name, "the God of the Bible," on our coins: "In
God we trust." We are still willing to have God's name on our money, but it
appears we don't want God's name on our school children! You don't have to
go "to far away places" to find heathen! We are in great need of home
missionaries. Every true Christian Is a missionary.
"WHY DO THE HEATHEN RAGE?" Why? what is the cause? It is to get rid
of the Commandment of God, His. King, His Moral Law, His Ten
Commandments: "To break the bands, cast away the cords" of restraint the

Editor in chief .................... SARA ANSPACH
Managing Editor..............JULIE ENGEBRECHT
University Editor................LORENZO BENET
News Editor......................DAVID MEYER
Opinion Page Editors........... CHARLES THOMSON
KEVIN TOTTIS
Sports Editor................MARK MIHANOVIC
Associate Sports Editors............ GREG DeGULIS
MARK FISCHER
BUDDY MOOREHOUSE
DREW SHARP
Chief Photographer.............PAUL ENGSTROM
PHOTOGRAPHERS- Jackie Bell, Kim Hill, Deborah
Lewis, Mike Lucas, Brian Masck.
ARTISTS: Robert Lence, Jonathon Stewart, Richard
Walk, Norm Christiansen.
ARTS STAFF: Jane Carl, Mark Dighton, Michael Huget,
Adam Knee, Pom Kromer, Gail Negbour
NEWS STAFF: John Adam, Beth Allen. Julie Barth,
Carol Choltron, Andrew Chapman, Lisa Crumrine.,
Debi Davis, Ann Marie Fazo, Pam Fickinger, Denise
Franklin, Joyce Frieden, Mark Gindin, Julie Hinds,
Steve Hook. Kathy Hoover, Mindy Layne, Jennifer Mil-
ler, Dan Oberrotman. Janet Roe, David Spak, Fannie
Weinstein, Barry Witt.

SPORTS STAFF
SPORTS STAFF: Barb Barker, Randy Berger. Mork
Borowoski, Joe Chopelle, Martho Crall, Jim Dworman,
John Fitzpatrick, Larry Freed, Chuck Hartwig, Chuck
Jaffe, John Kerr, Larry Mishkin, Don Newman, Ron
Pollack, Jeff Quicksilver, Steve Schaumberger.
Sarah Sherber, James Thompson, Kent. Walley, Chris
Wilson, Bob Wojnowski.
BUSINESS STAFF
Business Manager...............RANDI CIGELNIK
Sales Manager-.................BARB FORSLUND
Operations Manager..............SUSANNE KELLY
Display Manager............ MARY ANN MISIEWICZ
Clossifieds Manager............DENISE SULLIVAN
Finance Manager ...............MICHAEL YORICK
Assistant Disolav Manager.........NANCY JOSLIN
Nationals Manager............SUSAN RABUSHKA
Circulation Manager................KIM WOODS
Sales Coordinator............ E. ANDREW PETERSEN
BUSINESS STAFF: Liz Altman, Hope Barron, Lindsay
Bray, Joe Brodo, Alexander bePillis, Aldo Eisenstadt,
Susan Epps. Wendy Fox, Sandy Frcka, Pamela Gould,
Kathryn Hendrick, Anthony lntqrrante. Indre Luitkus,
Beth Kovinsky, Barbara Miner, Caryn Notisse, Felice
Oper. Jodi Pollock. Michael Sovitt, Michael
Seltzer, Karen Silverstein, Sam Slaughter, Adrienne
Strombi, Nancy Thompson, Jeffrey Voigt.

01

PUBLICATION SCHEDULE
1981
SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER
01112 4 678910 8 4101121314 6 89 10412
131 151 17isE1819 111 1374 1561 15i 1i 171 19202
27 t8 93029 6 2122930J4 315J6 I7_5_17____9_202____
2 22 2425 26 84920 2122 2324 2242 24 25 e6s-,-
1982
ANUARY J FEBRUARY J MARCH APRIL
S TTFS S M T W T F SI S M T W TF'iS S M TW"T F

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan