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October 11, 1981 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-10-11

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he Michigan Daily Sunday, October 11, 1981-Page 9
NCAA ROUNDUP
Arizona stuns USC

LOS ANGELES (AP) - Sophomore
quarterback Tom Tunnicliffe threw for
293 yards and the winning touchdown
yesterday as lightly regarded Arizona
stunned to ranked Southern Cal 13-10.
Tunnicliffe, who grew up in the Los
Angeles area but opted to play his
college football in Arizona, completed
21 of 37 throws in the Pacific-10 Con-
ference shocker.
ARIZONA, NOW 3-2 and 2-2 .in the
Pac-10, trailed most of the contest, but
Tunnicliffe connected with tailback
Vance Johnson on a 13-yard swing pass
for a touchdown with two seconds
remaining in the third quarter. That
gave the Wildcats their 1340 advantage
and they were able to hold on.
Although Southern Cal tailback Mar-
cus Allen gained 211 yards, going over
200 yards for the fifth consecutive
game, the Wildcats controlled the tem-
po bf the contest after the first quarter
* withi a determined defensive effort and
effective short passing game.
The loss was the first of the season for
Southern Cal, 4-1. The Trojans are now
14in conference play..
Texas 34, Oklahoma 14
-DALLAS (AP) - For two quarters
yesterday, the unbeaten and No. 3-
ranked Te xas Longhorns gave a good
fumble imitation of the Oklahoma
Sooners.
Once they quit giving the ball away,
the Longhorns overwhelmed the 10th-
rated Sooners 34-14 in their annual
collegiate football blood feud in Texas'
biggest runaway in 11 years. Texas fell
behind, 14-3 at halftime thanks to fum-
bles, including one on the opening
-kickoff.
OKLAHOMA, which had lost 11 fum-
bles in three games, coughed up the ball
four times in the second half in what
became a nationally televised rout
SCORES
BIG TEN
MICHIGAN 38, Michigan St.20
Iowa 42, Indiana 28
Minnesota 35, Northwestern 23
Purdue 44, Illinois 20
Wisconsin 24, Ohio St. 21
EAST
Princeton 21, Columbia 14
Delaware 38, Massachusetts 15
Brown 26, Penn 4
Harvard, 27, Cornell 10
Navy 30, Air Force 13
Penn St. 38, Boston College 7
Pittsburgh 17, W. virginia 0
William & Mary 12 Dartmouth 7
Yale 29, Holy Cross 28
Rutgers 17, Army 0

before 74,587 fans in the sold-out Cotton
Bowl.
"It was like two different ball
games," said Texas Coach Fred Akers,
who enjoyed his third straight victory
over Oklahoma Coach Barry Switzer.
"The second half showed this team has
a lot of will and heart. We didn't think
there was anything wrong with the way
we played the first half except for the
fumbles."
Florida State 19,
Notre Dame 13
SOUTH BEND (AP) - Rick
Stockstill threw a pair of second half
touchdown passes to Mike Whiting
yesterday to lead the 20th-ranked
FloridaSeminoles to a 19-13 victory
over Notre Dame.
James Harris set up the winning
touchdown when he intercepted a Blair
Kiel pass in the fourth quarter and five
plays later Stockstill hit Whiting with a
five-yard tie-breaking touchdown pass.
EARLIER IN the half the same com-
bination connected on a 17-yard touch-
down pass as the Seminoles boosted
their record to 4-1 with a second
straight victory over a Midwest power.
Last week the Seminoles upset Ohio
State 36-27. .
The loss left Notre Dame with a 2-3
record under rookie Coach Gerry
Faust.
North Carolina 48,
Wake Forest 10
BIRMINGHAM (AP) - Sophomore
Steve Clark kicked a 40-yard field goal
with eight seconds left to, give Southern
Mississippi a 13-13 tie with seventh-
ranked Alabama in college football
yesterday.
The last time the Golden Eagles had
such success against Alabama, back in
1956, it was by the same score.
The deadlock delayed Alabama's

drive to give Coach Bear Bryant a
record 315 victories. His mark now is
310-80-17.
Alabama 13,
Southern Mississippi 13
CHAPEL.. HILL, N.C. (AP) -
Sophomore Tyrone Anthony scored two
touchdowns and rushed for 224 yards on
26 carries No. 5 North Carolina romped
to a 48-10 victory over Wake Forest in
an Atlantic Coast Conference football
game yesterday.
Anthony, starting in place of injured
tailback Kelvin Bryant, amassed the
fifth-highest single-game rushing yar-
dage total in Tar Heel history. His
touchdowns came on runs of 30 and two
yards.
UNLV 45, Brig. Young 41
PROVO, Utah (A)- Quarterback
Sam King fired a 20-yard touchdown
pass to Jim Sandusky with 19 seconds
left, as Nevada-Las Vegas stunned
eighth-ranked Brigham Young 45-41
and snapped the Cougars' 17-game
winning streak yesterday before a
disappointed homecoming crowd.
King, who marched the Rebels 79
yards for the final score, threw another
touchdown pass, ran for a third score
and set up two other UNLV touchdowns
with long passes.
In all, the 6-foot-1 senior completed
31-of 57 passes for 473 yards.
BYU's winning streak had been, the
nation's longest, but the Cougars were
playing without injured All-American
quarterback Jim McMahon.
~.&J 4.-J -1. .e u -

firVF SITY %8OUSICAL 8CIETY
October Calendar

The "dazzling music making" of the Zagreb
Philharmonic, Yugoslavia's premiere sym-
phony orchestra, opens the 103rd annual
Choral Union Series. The orchestra, which
is on its first extended American tour, is
under the baton of Pavle Despalj and fea-
tures his brother Valter Despalj as solo
cellist. Friday, 8:30
Hill Auditorium

Philharmonic Orchestra
FridayOct.1

TH I ETURA.
AUROLA/ATOLA-QNASTERA ,
EL LST SN\AOCt8

Anthony di Bonaventura will
perform Alberto Ginastera's
"Piano Sonata No. 1" and will
accompany Aurora Natola-
Ginastera, the wife of
the composer, in a performance
of Ginastera's "Cello Sonata
No. 1." Sunday, 4:00
Rackham Auditorium

SOUTH
Clemson 27, Virginia 0
Furman 22, Appalachian St. 18
Duke 14, Virginia Tech?7
George 37, Mississippi 7
N. Carolina 48, Wake Forest 10
.VMt 14, Citadel 0
Tennessee 10, Georgia Tech 7
Alabama 13, S. Mississippi 13, tie
MIDWEST
Florida St. 19, Notre Dame 13
Kent St. 31, N. Illinois 10
"Toledo 42, E. Michigan 7
Bowling Green 7, Miami, Ohio 7, tie
Central Michigan 15, W. Michigan 13
Indiana Central 28, Evansville 6
Indiana St. 31, Ball St.?7
Graceland 40, Mid-American 29
SOUTHWEST-
Arkansas St. 14, S. W. Louisiana 3
N. Texas St. 38. New Mexico St. 16
Mississippi St. 3?, Colorado St 27
Texas 34, Oklahoma 14
FAR WEST
Arizona 13, USC 10
Nevada-Las Vegas 45, Brigham Young 41
BASEBALL
American League Division Playoffs
Milwaukee 2, New York i (series tied 2-2)
National League Division Playoffs
Philadelphia 6, Montreal 5 (series tied 2-2)
A os Angeles 2, Houston 1 (series tied 2-2)
Washington 6, Detroit 3 NHL
Boston 1, Hartford 1

A special University Musical Society/
School of Music collaboration featuring
Anthony di Bonaventura, piano; Aurora
Natola=Ofnastcra; ello; Marilyn Mason,,
organ; Leslie Guinn, baritone'; Conitempor-
ary Directions Ensemble; U-M Symphony
Orchestra; Carl St. Clair and Gustav Meier,
conductors. Tuesday, 8:00
Hill Auditorium

ALB EROGNASITERA
TUESDM( 0 T1~

United Artists

P Faye Dunaway I
HARRISON DMR5 OF THE
FOR DPG
FAIOR NO'LOST ARK 7:05
BARAINHORS OWIN EFFECT A PARA.4dOUNT PICTURE .' .91
MDNM E :000
SHOWS 5:15
BSDY.I9f:30

London
Earl Mus ic Group
Fri act.23.

Hailed as one of the most authoritative
groups in early music, these five musicians
combine their experience with music of the
Middle Ages and the Renaissance tc create
a sound which "immediately catches the-lis-
tener's fancy, then leaves an indelible im-
print on the memory." - Daily Telegraph,
London. Friday, 8:30
Rackham Auditorium

Ic

I

]V { f A
^J
4

THE ROLE OF THE SOCIAL SCIENCES IN
CHINA'S MODERNIZATION
ZHAO FUSAN, SecAe-tay-Generaw o the
Commisson on Foreign Academic Retafti ns
of the Chinese Academy o SociaL
Sciences (CASS), and Deputy Ditecto4 06
the Inbtibtue ad WoAtd Re2fig.ion6, CASS
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 21
R
CHINA AND MODERNITY
BENJAMN I. SCHWAkTZ, LetoyB. WiLiam.6
P'ojeson of H tony and GoveAnment at
Harva' d Univeity
T'hi 6the 6Z'Lat in -the Annuat
AtexandeA Echstern MemoxiaX LectuAe
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27

/;; rTZ3mir[Em
t 0o Q
alruBEE&
kmq wsfff Q 4 QOMP7,
12(cirun El.

The acclaimed Court Dance Theatre of
Okinawa affords Ann Arbor audiences their
first opportunity to see Okinawan dance.
Okinawas beauty, as well as its historical
significance is captured with breathtaking
costumes and beautifully crafted props
that create a spectacular visual effect.
Wednesday, 8:00
Power Center

Okinawan
Dance Troupe
Wednesday,OcI. 28

Nathan Milstein
Violinist
Thursday, Oct,.29

"...this man has been an impeccable model
for all other musicians. In taste, execution,
style, and in the intangible area of express-
ive shading compounded of phrasing, tone,
and other indefinables, Milstein has known
no superior and few equals." - Washington
Post. Thursday, 8:30
Hill Auditorium

LITERATURE AND SOCIETY IN CHINA-
THE SITUATION OF THE WRITER TODAY
VING LING, modemn China' ALeading woman
noveli.t, and Vice-Chairman o jthe
Chine.6e W iteu Union

"Martha Graham is genius recurrent. Her
dancers are tremendous ... The Graham
troupe, by whatever standards you care to
name, is quite obviously one of the greatest
dance conmpanies in the world." - Clive
Barnes, New York Post. Fri., Sat. at 8:00;
Sun. at 3:00
Power Center

MarthaGraham
Dance Comlpany
F ri., Sat.,Oct. 30,31
Sun..Nnv.

I

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