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October 11, 1981 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 1981-10-11

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SPORTS

The Michigan Daily

Sunday, October 11, 1981

Page 8

0

Brewers prolong series in 2-1
Philadelphia beats Montreal

NEW YORK (AP) - Pete Vuckovick,
battling tonsillitis and a fever, held
New Yorktto one hit for five innings and
relievers Jamie Easterly and Rollie
Fingers bailed Milwaukee out of late-
inning trouble as the Brewers beat the
Yankees 2-1 yesterday and evened their
American League EastDivision playoff
at two games apiece.
In staving pf elimination for the
second day in a row after dropping the
first two games at home, the Brewers
produced just enough offense against
Rick Reuschel in the fourth inning.
CECIL COOPER drove in a run with
a sacrifice fly and Ben Oglivie, hitless
in 12 previous playoff at-bats, delivered
the decisive tally with a two-out double.

The final game of the best-of-five
series is scheduled for Yankee Stadium
at 7:10 .m. EDT Sunday, with Ron
Guidry pitching for New York and
Moose Haas for Milwaukee. They were
the starters in Wednesday's opening
game, with the Yankees chasing Haas
in the- fourth inning and pinning the
defeat on him. Guidry, knocked out in
the fifth, was not involved in the
decision.
Vuckovich, who was unable to pitch
Thursday and Friday and had to go to a
Milwaukee hospital for antibiotics,
walked three and struck out four, while
allowing a leadoff single by Reggie
Jackson in the second inning.
BUT THE BIG right-hander, who tied

for the AL lead with 14 victor
the regular season, ran into
the sixth, when first basem
botched Jerry Mumphrey's
for an errorand Dave Winfie
double down the third base lin
That brought on Easterl
neyman left-hander, to face
the Yankees' celebrated Mr
with runners at second and t
one out.
After falling behind on the
Easterly buzzed three co
strikes. past Jackson. Pinch-
Piniella's grounder to short
phrey home with New York'
but Winfield was cut down
tried to go to third, taking th
tying run out of scoring positi
Graig Nettles, who has no
during the series flied out to
ning.
Phillies 2, Expos 1
PHILADELPHIA (AP) -
ter George Vukovich led offt
ning with a home run over
field wall off ace reliever Jef
giving the Philadelphia Ph
victory over the Montre
yesterday and tying their
League East Division cha
series at two games apiece.
It was only the fifth earn
Reardon in the last 40 inning

victory,
in 10 innings
ries during he posted an 0.97 earned run average.
trouble in Reardon had saved the Montreal vic-
an Cooper tories in the first two games of this
grounder series.
ld ripped a VUKOVICH, WHO has three-pinch
ne. hits in the series, batted for winning
y, a jour- reliever Tug McGraw. He hit an 0-2 pit-
e Jackson, ch for his winning shot.
. October, The fifth and decisive game will be
hird and no played Sunday at 4:05 p.m. EDT, with
the first game pitchers - Steve Carlton
count 3-0, for Philadelphia and Steve Rogers for
rnsecutive the Expos - matched again.
-hitter Lou The Phillies grabbed a 2-0 lead in the
got Mum- first inning off Montreal starter Scott
s only run, Sanderson. With two out, Bake McBride
n when he singled and major league home run
e potential leader Mike Schmidt slammed a homer
on. over the left field wall for his first of the
t had a hit series.
end the in- THE PHILLIES boosted their lead to
4-0 in the third.
Rose opened with a single and Sch-
midt walked with one out. Gary Mat-
thews then grounded to shortstop Chris
Pinch-hit- Speier, who flipped to second baseman
the 10th in- Jerry Manuel attempting to start a
r the right routine double play.
f Reardon, But Manuel missed the bag and Sch-
illies a 6-5 midt was safe on the error, Rose ad-
al Expos vancing to third. Montreal Manager
r National Jim Fanning then removed Sanderson
mpionship in favor of Stan Bahnsen, whose, first
pitch was grounded into right by Keith'
led run off Moreland, scoring Rose and Schmidt
gs in which with two unearned runs.

tueday Luncvh-Discussion
ss
Ocber 13---12Noon
"THE LINE S DRAWN:
APARTHEID.SO1UTH AFRICA
vs L IBE RATED ZIMBABWE9'
Speaker: DR. LEONARD SURANSKY
At The INTERNATIONAL CENTER
603 E. Madison Street for additional information,
please call 662-5529
LUNCH $-1.00
Co-sponsored by ,
The Ecumenical Campus Center
The International Center
Church Women United in Ann Arbor
GALUIPOLI DISCOVEREDI

6

AP Photo
PHILADELPHIA'S MIKE Schmidt takes five from teammate Bake Mc-
$ride at home plate following Schmidt's home run yesterday in the Phillies'
game against the Montreal Expos. The Phils won, 6-5.

by . ....

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Run or
By ANDY OAKES
Call it another low key fun-run,if you wish, but the
"Run for the Health of It" five-kilometer event held
yesterday was more than that. Sponsored by the
University Health Service with considerable help
from the Markley Residence Hall administration,
this race served as a statement that Health Service
would rather maintain good health than cure poor
health. . .
Skipper Doria, residence hall director at Markley,
relayed this attitude. "Here at the University,
students are under a lot of strain just to develop
emotionally," said Doria. "So one of the purposes of
this concept is to help students develop in other man-
ners. And this is one of the reasons we're having this
run. It's all based on high level wellness; developing
the entire part of a person, not just specific little
bits."

the lea
DIANE MCCLARAN, health educator at the Health
Service, and her graduate assistant Robin Breakey
came up with the idea for the race, and hope to make
it an annual event. "We brought it over here because
we were doing some - wellness programming with
Ma'rkley, and we wanted to make it a university
event," said McClaran.
By the way, the race did go on, with first place
going to, Don Passenger, an all-American at the
University of Kentucky, who transferred to.Michigan
and is sitting out a year before joining the Wolverine
thinclads. Commenting on the course and his 16:01.7
time, Passenger said, "It's really well marked, I was
really amazed. It was -hilly at the end, but you had
more downhill than uphill, really."
Second place went to Doug Van Zoeren, a second
year medical student here at Michigan, whose
collegiate harrier experiences came at Kalamazoo
College.

l

w 1 r

Ith 0it
THE WOMEN'S division was paced by former "M"
,harrier Josie Von Boigplander, whose 20:02 time was
accompanied by a healthy respect for the rigorous
course; "The course was a lot tougher than what I've
run for collegiate cross country. My time was 30
seconds slower than what I've previously run on
cross country courses."
The event possessed a lot of personality, and
dramatically adding to it were such inspiring com-
petitors as 61-year-old Walter Nafranowicz, who
crossed the line in 40:17 with a smile ear to ear. When
asked about the race, Nafranowicz responded in an
effervescent manner. "Bqautiful, beautiful!" he
said. "Except it got a little steep at the end."
"This race is really just a symbolic gesture of-the
program that we're trying to continue, and Markley
is a pilot project, but hopefully, we'll expand-i1t
elsewhere as time goes on." ;

"A orgeous film of glowing scenes. Transcends the
oalnary." -Gene Shalit, NBC-TV "Today Show"
"Absorbing, moving, deeply felt. Brilliantly
photographed. The battle sequences rank with those,
in Kubrick's 'Paths of Glory'." -Jack Kroli, Newsweek
"Could well be the movie of the year. As colorful as
'Raiders of the Lost Ark' Exciting, involving and
splendidly acted., -Dave Sterritt, Christian Science Monitor
"Can take Its place with pride next to another World
War I classic, 'All QuIet On The Western Front'.
Poignant, vividly told:' ' -Edwin Miller, Seventeen

i

Offl.N... ..
I ...... SPO.R TS OF THE.DAILY:

S
ME

FACTORY
CLOSEOUTS
iHOES FOR
N & WOMEN
* RACKETBALL *

Women harriers take 2nd

R1 fM fISENIA jTtl Ill " IA[[IO " MR t[[I r [ CIS O'B R mD UIO D [IAMSON
IP[W f RW EIR' "polRO OL W NT ff "DIE IPETER WEIR ___
PG PDERhl tU MSTl91ON E Docw MMX bFnomAl crI ~lro. 1+.
NOW SHOWING
1214 s. univers y MON-TUE-THUR-FRI 7:15-9:15
SAT-SUN-WED
1:00-3:00-5:00-7:15-9:15

* VOLLEYBALL *
* SQUASH *i
-Puma-Spolding-
-Lotto-.Footloy-
ACCESSORIES
RACKETS
BALLS
GLOVES
EYEGUARDS

Special tothe Daily
KALAMAZOO - Not all of Michigan
State's teams fell prey to the
Wolverines yesterday, as the Michigan
women's cross country team placed
second to the Spartans in the Western
Michigan Invitational.
Michigan's first finisher was Sue
Fredrick who placed fifth in the meet
with a time of 18:06. Next for the
Wolverines was Lisa Larsen, who
crossed the tape seventh at 18:21. She
was immediately followed by team-
mate Judy Yuhn at 18:23.
WALK-ON Ann Boyd finished next for
Michigan, coming in 19th with the time
of 19:13. The final scorer for the
Wolverines was Lynn Fudala, who was,
22nd at 19:22.
This marked the first meet in the
history of the women's squad that
Melanie Weaver was not the top
finisher for the team. The junior is
reported to have been resting for the
upcofning Big Ten Championships.
Michigan State runners took the first
four spots, accumulating only 16points.
The Wolverines had 61, followed by

Western Michigan with 74 and Central
Michigan with 98.
The thinclads will travel to Ypsilanti
next weekend to compete in the Eastern
Michigan Invitational.
Linksters finish eighth
Special to the Daily
MT. PLEASANT - The Michigan
women's golf team finished eighth out
of a field of 15 yesterday in the MAIAW
competition.
The Wolverines gathered 693 points.
Ohio State, the match winner, had the
low score of 632 followed by Southern
Illinois with 663 and Marshall and
Illinois State who were tied with 667.
ELAINE SATYSHUR finished eighth.
overall leading the Wolverine pack with
a score of 162. Next for the Michigan
linksters was Karyn Colbert who with a
score of 171 tied for the number 27 spot.
Donna Smith placed 39th with a score .
of 179 followed by teammate Linda
Drillock who shot a 181 to finish 46.
The golf team will have their final
match next weekend when they com-

pete in the Kentucky Invitational a t
Lexington.
AIA Wfiles suit
WASHINGTON (AP)- 'The
,Association for Intercollegiate
Athletics for Women announced Satur-
day that it has failed an antitrust suit
that seeks to bar the National
Collegiate Athletic Association from
holding intercollegiate championships
in women's sports.
AIAW President Donna A. Lopiano
said the lawsuit, filed Friday in U.S.
District Court here, was in response to
"blatantly unfair" and "predatory"
practices by the NCAA in the women's
athletics field. Such actions have had a
"devastating and immediate impact"
on the AIAW, she said.
The NCAA voted at its annual
meeting last June to institute 29 cham-
pionship programs for women in 12
sports. Finals in two sports, cross coun-
try and field hockey, are scheduled to
begin on Nov. 21.

406 E. Liberty
2 Blocks off State St.

L

WESTER
ARGENI
BRAZIL
INDONE
JAPAN

FOREIGN STU.DENTS
RECRUITMENT FOR
SHELL COMPANIES OVERSEAS
A service furnished to overseas Shell companies
by SCALLOP CORPORATION (a Shell company)
OPPORTUNITIES FOR NATIONALS OF WEST EUROPEAN COUNTRIES AND OF
ARGENTINA, BRAZIL, INDONESIA, JAPAN, NETHERLANDS ANTILLES, NI-
GERIA, THAILAND, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES AND EAST MALAYSIA, WHO
WISH TO RETURN TO THEIR AR AS OF ORIGIN.
SCALLOP CORPORATION represented by PETER C. VAN KEEKEM will be on campus
to interview graduates of above nationalities in the following disciplines:
N JUROPE: M.S. or Ph.D. level Petroleum, Chemical, Mechanical, Electrical (Po
and Control) and Civil/Structural Engineers.
Ph.D. level Geologists-M.S. or Ph.D. level Geophysicists. Ph.D. level Ch
fists (British only).
M.S. or Ph.D. level Computer Systems Analysts.
Ph.D. level Operations Research Specialists.
TINA: Petroleum and Mechanical Engineers, Geologists, Geophysicists and Finan
Economics and Business-oriented graduates.
-o Appropriate graduates in Economics, Finance and Marketing.
Chemical Engineers and Agronomists.
SIA: Appropriate graduates for the Chemicals and Metals Trading Administration
Appropriate araduates for the Finance Administration.
Technical graduates for a potential career in Exploration and Production of o

r -
.
1 f. !"
.
.,
,: i

LATINOAMERICA CANTA
THE
PENA tR

ower
hem-
ncial, ,
ail.

101

!
1 , }.

MUSICA DEbMERICA LATINA-A SERIES OF CONCERTS OF LATIN AMERICAN
MUSIC. "PENA" in Latin America is a reunion of musicians in an informal
atmosphere sharing their music and art. Empanados, punch and the pursuit
of Solidarity are part of the meaning of "pena". We invite you to join us.
October 11, Sunday 7:30 pm/Admission $3.50
ISMAEL DURAN (Chilean) has performed widely in the mid-
west and has also sung with Los Companeros in Toronto.
JOSE.DOMINGO MURILLO (Colombia)

(

I

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