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October 07, 1981 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1981-10-07

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Page 2-Wednesday, October 7, 1981--The Michigan Daily

Senate-
tovote on
abortion
fund's

LANSING (UPI)- The Senate
yesterday quietly positioned for final
action a measure backers believe will
once and for all end state funding of
welfare abortions in Michigan.
The House-passed bill was advanced
to a third reading on a voice vote. Final
action could come assoon as today.
"IT'S THE SAME old fight of abor-
tion versus non-abortion," said Sen.
Alvin DeGrow (R-Pigeon). "That's
what it comes down to and I assume the
governor will veto it again."
Michigan is one of only a handful of
states that offer to pay for elective

abortions under the Medicaid program.
Gov. William Milliken, "a staunch
abortion rights supporter, has used his
veto power to repeatedly frustrate
legislative efforts to end the practice in
recent years.
LATE LAST year, an override fight
was successful in the Senate, but fell
five votes short in the House of the two-
thirds needed.
Abortion foes, however, believe a
new, slightly more conservative House
that took office in January is likely to
approve an override this time.
As it passed the House, the latest
abortion ban bill would also have

established a state office of abortion
alternatives to provide counseling ser-
vices for women with unwanted
pregnancies.
The Senate, however, went along'with
its appropriating committee in drop-
ping the added provision, originally
seen as a selling point capable of clin-
ching wavering votes in the expected
override battle.
The committee "concluded that two
separate issues could better be handled
in two separate bills," said Sen.
Stephen Monsma (D-Grand Rapids), a
leading abortion foe.

IN BRIEF

Y

Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports

40

Congress postpones
arms sale deeision

WASHINGTON (AP) - The
assassination of Egyptian President
Anwar Sadat prompted congressional
leaders yesterday to urge a slowdown
in consideration of President Reagan's
arms sale to Saudi Arabia..
Senate Republican leader Howard
Baker, who supports the sale, said
Congress "should place a moratorium
on our worrying about" the $8.5 billion
arms package.
BUT BAKER,who said he thinks the
arms package is gaining support in
Congress, said he was thinking of a
delay of only about a week, not- an in-
definite postponment.
"I really don't think that the
assassination of President Sadat ought
to be a determining factor," said
Baker, who added that "I think it will
have an effect."
The House Foreign Affairs Commit-
tee, meanwhile, put off at least until
today its scheduled vote on a resolution
to veto the sale. The panel was still

regarded virtually certain to recom-
mend that action. The deal can. be
killed only if both houses disapprove it
by Nov. 1.
BUT THERE WERE conflicting
signals in the Senate. One of 19
Republicans opponents immediately
switched in favor of the sale of AWACS
radar planes and jetfighter equipment,
and other senators suggested the issue
should be put off indefinitely for re-
evaluation.
Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) said, ".I'm
going to reverse my evote on AWACS
and support the president. We have to
have the safeguards this deployment
makes."
Hatch was one of a dozen
Republicans targeted by Reagan and,
his strategists for a heavy dose of
presidential lobbying. The Senate GOP,
leadership estimates it would take that
many switches from the ranks of the
opposition and the uncommitted to
forestall a veto.

When the guys at Miller asked me to
write an ad on writing, I said, "Forget it.
Not even if you held a gun to my head' So
they held a bottle of Lite Beer to my mouth.
They're a pretty persuasive group.
THUGS TO MUGS,
If you're going to write-anything, know
what you're talking ,about. And that means
three things: Research, research, and
more research. The more you know, the
more you can tell your reader.
Take my characters. A lot of them I
base on actual people. There's this buddy.
; of mine who pops upin every book I write.
In one story he's a cop. In another, a pri-
vate eye. Once, I made him a millionaire.
Using him not only helped make character
development a heck of a lot easier, he was
so carried away by the rich image, he
bought me a lot of free dinners (and a lot of
Lite Beer from Miller). So use the people
you know as models.
. GREATW

Even locations should be based on
real things. If you're writing about a bar,
know that bar. Hang out there. Watch the
bartender. The customers. Whatever
they drink, you drink. When they drink
Lite Beer, you drink LiteBeer. Re-
member-research is most fun when
you soak up as much subject matter as
.you can. It can only help you paint a
better picture.
HI, DOLL
No caper is complete without dames
(or ladies in proper English). Experience
has shown me that in mystery writing, the
sexier the dames, the better. Experience
has also shown me that sexy scenes make
great punctuation marks. This is where
research has the greatest potential. Use
your own discretion in this matter. But
when you write about it, don't be too
explicit. Thatway, your reader gets to paint
a more vivid picture.

CAPER TO PAPER.
O.K., you've got your characters, loca-
tions, and dames lined up. Now comes the
good part: Putting your caper to paper.
There's no mystery to it. As long as you
write the ending first, the rest will follow.
Write short, terse, to-the-point sentences.
Be as clear as possible. And make sure
you've got the right stuff around for when
you get thristy. After all, writing is pretty,
thirsty work.
I suggest a couple of mugs of Lite
Beer- who ever heard of a caper that
didn't involve a couple of mugs?
Why Lite Beer? It's a lot like me and my
books-great taste, less filling (some
people can't get their fill of my books), and
always good to spend time with.
At any rate, follow my advice and, who
knows-you might turn out a heck of a
story. Or you might turn out to be a heck of
a Lite Beer drinker.

House bucks administration
spending ceiling, passes bill
WASHINGTON- The House refused yesterday to cut an appropriations
bill to administration-desired levels, but Republican leaders said the ap-
parent defeat indicates they can sustain vetoes of "budget-busting" bills.
The action on an $87.3 billion measure for the departments of Labor,
Education and Health and Human Services represented the first
congressional test for President Reagan's latest round of spending cuts.
With Democratic leaders concurring, the House agreed 383-30 to trim $74
milljon from the measure, but a Republican move to send the entire package
back to a committee drawing board in light of a possible presidential veto
failed 249-168.
The House then passed the measure on a voice vote, instead of the usual
recorded tally. House Republican whip Trent Lott of Mississippi said GOP
leaders did not seek a recorded vote because the tally to recommit the
measure told them what they wanted to know.
"We have the votes, with room to spare, to sustain a veto," Lott said.
Canada asksU.S. to join
acid rain cleanup effort
WASHINGTON- Canadian officials urged the United States yesterday to
launch a joint attack on acid rain, the pollution phenomenom blamed for
"killing" Canadian and northern U.S. lakes.
"We in Canada and U.S.A. are in this mess together.. Let us work hard to
get out of it together," said James Bruce, assistant deputy minister for En-
vironment Canada.
Bruce, one of fou officials appearing before the House subcommittee on
health and the environment, cited the success of joint U.S.-Canadian efforts
to clean up the Great Lakes, and said a similar success could be achieved
with the acid rain problem.
Acid rain has been linked to emissions from coal-burning power plants and
factories in the United States. It has been blamed for killing the entire fish
populations in some lakes and for damaging vegetation.
Iran executes 61 leftists,
Iranian consulate ransacked
ANKARA, Turkey- Revolutionary guards executed 61 more leftist
Mojahideen dissidents in Tehran as anti-Khomeini opponents yesterday shot
up and ransacked the Iranian consulate in Istanbul to protest the mounting
death toll.
The Iranians, reportedly students, entered the three-story consulate
building one by one. They regrouped inside and took Consul-General
Mohammed Ali Sarmadi and eight staff members at gunpoint to basement
rooms and locked them up, police said.
Police surrounded the building and ended the siege within 50 minutes when
the 26 Mojahideen supporters surrendered. They filed out the front door,
hands covering their masked faces, and were arrested.
A Turkish and an Iranian guard and a consulate employee were wounded
in shooting during the seizure, Turkish police said.
Afghan guerrillas
execute 10 Russians
NEW DELHI, India - moslem guerrillas in Afghanistan executed 10 cap-
tured Russian soldiers while repelling a combined Soviet-Afghan army attack
on a town near Kabul, a Western diplomat said yesterday.
The diplomat said the Soviet soldiers were probably killed between Sept. 23
and 29 when a large Soviet-Afghan army contingent failed in its drive to cap-
ture the town of Pagman, 12 miles southwest of Kabul.
Vol. XCII, No.24
Wednesday, October 7, 1981
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109. Sub-
scription rates: $12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail
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Editor in chief ............ . ....... SARA ANSPACH
Managing Editor............. .. JULIE ENGEBRECHT
University Editor................LORENZO BENET
News Editor ........................ DAVID MEYER
Opinion Page Editors................ KEVIN TOTTIS
CHARLES THOMSON
Sports Editor G...... MARK MIHANOVIC
Associate Sports Editors ...... GREG D9GULIS
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Chief Photographer .............PAUL ENGSTROM
ARTISTS: Robert Lence. Norm Christiansen, Jonathon
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PHOTOGRAPHERS: Jackie Bell, Kim Hill, Deborah
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MAGAZINE/ARTS STAFF: Jane Carl, Mark Dighton,-
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SPORTS STAFF
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BUSINESS STAFF
Business Manager .......;:........ kANDI CIGELNIK
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BUSINESS STAFF: Liz Altman, Hope Barron, Lindsay
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PUBLICATION SCHEDULE
1981
SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER
S M T W T F S SM T W T F S S M T W.T F S S M T W T F S
4.----4-6 1.2 3 1 3 4' 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 5
10 11 12 4 6 7 8 9 10 8 10 11 12 13 14 6 8 9 10t11 12
13 1 1516 17 1819 171 1314 15 16 17 15 17 18 19 20 21
20 22 23 24 25 26 18 2021 22 23 24 22 24 25 06072---
27 29 30 256 27 28 29 30 311
1982
JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL
S M T W-T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T.W T F S

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