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October 04, 1981 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1981-10-04

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The Michigan Daily-Sunday, October 4, 1981-Page 3
Good U.S.-China relations

needed,
By PAUL TUCCI
The United States must continue to
cultivate good relations with the{
People's Republic of China, not to coun-
terweight to Soviet influence, but
because of the resulting mutual
benefits for China and the United
States, according to former U.S. am-
bassador to China Leonard Woodcock,
who is now a visiting professor at the
University.
In a speech to the Detroit Council on
World Affairs Thursday night, Wood-
cock praised what he called tremen-
dous advances made in Sino-U.S.
relation in the past decade and said the
United tates still has much to gain
from steadily improving relations.
CHINA WILL benefit from continued
cooperation through technological and
scholarly exchanges - such as its ex-
changeragreement with the University
- and through the sales of U.S. defen-
sive weapons to Peking. At the same
time, the United States will benefit
through access to China's vast
petroleum reserves and through other
economic exchange, he said.
The major question now, Woodcock

Woodcock says.

said, is whether the United States, un-
der the guidance of the Reagan ad-
ministration, and China will be willing
"to turn the corner" toward firming up
their good relations.
WOODCOCK SUPPORTED the
Reagan administration's decision to,
allow China to buy arms from the
United States. He argued that China's
military "is, at best, a defensive force"
and that any American arms that China
purchases would only be used defen-
sively. Woodcock, who left his post in
Peking last March, also pointed out that
China is under constant threat of a#

tacks from both the Soviet Union to the
north and Vietnam to the south. One-
fourth of the Soviet army is amassed on
the Chinese border, he noted.
China also faces great domestic
problems, Woodcock said. Without
foreign assistance, China might need
"decades to overcome the handicap" of
its one billion population. Faced with
the problem of its own sheer numbers
and its limited economic resources,
Woodcock said, China must "look to the=
outside world for assistance. It's in ours
national interest to see to it that one or:
the greatest sources of that assistance
is the United States."

in MAPLE VILLAGE SHOPPING CENTE R
0-"eMON FRI S2 I 6 PM

375 N. MAPLE
769-1 300
SAT -SUN $2tl 3PM5 a

Daily Photo by PAUL ENGSTROM
Stick 'em up

Mark and Greg Hannewald of Plymouth examine a toy gun at Bill Coelius' "Ye Old Toy Shoppe" during an Ann Arbor
Artists and Craftsmen Guild art fair yesterday. The show continues today at the Arborland Shopping Center from noon-
5 p.m.

U

HAPPENINGS-
SUNDAY
HIGHLIGHT
The Seventh Annual CROP/CWS Hunger Walk will take place today star-
ting at Zion Lutheran Church (1501 W. Liberty). The 10-mile walk will raise
funds for projects which combat hunger overseas and in Washtenaw County.
Walk registration is at 1 p.m. and the walk begins after 1:30 p.m. For more
information contact the Interfaith Council for Peace at 663-1870.
FILMS
CG-Abel Gance: The Charm of Dynamite, 7 p.m.; J'accuse, 8:15 p.m.,
Lorch Hall Aud.
Cinema II-Rene Clair Night, Le Million, 7 p.m.; A Nous La Liberte, 8:30
p.m., Angell Aud. A.
CFT - Woman of the Year, 5,7 & 9 p.m., Michigan Theater.
PERFORMANCES
PTP-Mirandola, 2 & 8 p.m., Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre, Mich. League.
School of Music-Violin cello Recital, Young Sook Lee, 8 p.m., Recital
Hall.
MISCELLANEOUS
Center for Russian and East European Studies/ Jiudiac Studies-Yiddish
Festival-Free-Image Before My Eyes, 7 p.m.; The Song of Randauti, 8:45
p.m., MLB Aud:uC4.i-
Computing Cente Tour, Seminar Rm., Computing Center, North Cam-
pus, 2-4 p.m. Registration required. Call 764-9595.
Artist and Craftsman Guild/Student Organizations, Activities and
Programs-Fall Art Fair, Arborland Mall, noon-5 p.m.
Hillel-Js of A2 (Jewish Joggers of Ann Aibor, jog and brunch, 1429 Hillel
St., 10 a.m.; Kosher Deli dinner, 6 p.m.; Israeli Folk dancing, 7-10 p.m.
SYDA Foundation - Hatha Yoga -advanced course, 902 Baldwin, 9:30-
11:30 a.m.
Union of Students for Israel-Multi-Media Show on Jerusalem, UGLI
Multipurpose Rm., 1,3,5,7,9 p.m.
MONDAY
HIGHLIGHT
President Harold Shapiro will give the annual State of the University Ad-
dress, 8 p.m., Hale Auditorium, School of Business Administration. All
members of the University and the community are invited to attend.
FILMS
AAFC-The Seventh Voyage of Sinbad, 7 p.m.; It Came from Beneath the
Sea, 8:45 p.m., Angell Aud. A.
CG-Fate of Hell, 8 p.m., (free), Lorch Hall.
SPEAKERS
Center For Near Eastern and North African Studies-Edna Coffin, "19th
Century Art and Artisans in Jerusalem," Commons Rm., Lane Hall. '
Center for South and Southeast Asian Studies-Alfredo Tiamson, Mon-
danao St. Univ., Phillipines, "Perspectives on Mindanao History and the
Present Conflict," 4 p.m., Commons Rm., Lane Hall.
Computing Center-Forest Hartman, "Intro to Message System," 7-8:30
p.m., B 120 MLB.
Inorganic Seminar-Prof. Robert Kruzkowski, "Sterochemistry in the
Catalytic Oxidation of Ethene, Propene and Allyl Alcohol," 4 p.m., Rm. 1200,
Chemistry Bldg.
Macromolecular Research Center-Dr. Joseph Salamone, "Synthesis and
Properties of Ampholytic Polymers," 4 p.m., Rm. 3005, Chemistry Bldg.
National Lawyers Guild Forum-"What Does the CIA Do and What is it
Doing at U. of M.? Speakers: Ali Mazrui, Lenore Goldman, Brett Eynon.
Bring lunch. 2 p.m., Lawyers Club Lounge, 515 S. State Street, Law School.
PERFORMANCES
Guild House Poetry Series-Sanford Lewis, 8 p.m., 802 Monroe.
School of Music-Piano DMA/Graduate Recital Series, 8 p.m., Rackham
Assembly Hall, Composers Forum, 8 p.m., Recital Hall.
MEETINGS
Americans for Democratic Action-Organizational Mtg., 7 p.m., Cong.
Rm. 4, Mich. Union.
SACUA-Mtg., 1 p.m., 4025 Fleming Admin. Bldg.
MISCELLANEOUS
Artspace Workshops-Framing (2 four-week sessions) 7-9 p.m., Contact
Sue Nemes, 763-1107.
Center for Continuing Education of Women-Panel discussion, "Career
Options for Office Workers," 7-9 p.m., Center Library.
Eclipse Jazz-Weekly workshop on Jazz Improvisation, 8:30-10' p.m.,
Assembfy Hall, Mich. Union.

Solidarity demands

change in
GDANSK, Poland (AP) - Solidarity
stopped short -of rejecting new gover-
nment laws on worker self-
management yesterday, but called for
a referendum on points it opposes.
"It is a compromise," said
Solidarity's national press spokesman
of a resolution adopted overwhelmingly
by some 850 delegates to the union's
congress. "It means we want some
changes in the law.
"BUT IT'S NOT outright war," he
added.
The resolution said the law basically
gave too much power to state managers
and that workers should be asked if
they want:
- management of factories solely by
work crews.
" control by workers' councils over
committees that choose general
managers.
- government autonomy only in enter-
prises concerned with national defense,
finance and justice.
The current dr'aft of the law does not
define which enterprises are exempt
fong its provisions, nor does it say in
which non-exempt enterprises
managers will be named by workers.
TWO WEEKS ago, Solidarity called
for a national referendum on whether
workers favored the union proposal
giving workers rights to name all fac-
tory managers, or the communist
regime's measure limiting the choice to
certain enterprises.
Parliament adopted the government
bills Sept. 26 after reaching a com-
promise with union leaders, and
delegates to the Solidarity congress
reprimanded union chief Lech Walesa
for accepting the milder version.
Despite anger over the law and a
formal reprimand, Walesa won election
as head of the union in voting Friday.
Poland's state-controlled press gave
heavy coverage to the election, an in-
dication that Poland's authorities
preferred Walesa.
The papers also announced the
national airline LOT will cancel
domestic flights on Saturdays to save
fuel, and that cigarette prices will
double tomorrow from about 20 cents to
40 cents.
SPECI
fromh
When you pay for It
KODAK Color Prints
made from slides,
the fourth is free.
M From your favorite color slides
We'll have Kodak make 4 color
prints from slides for the price
of 3.
One is Free
Hurry, offer ends November
11 1981
COLOR
PROCESSINGI
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wo kes l w HARRISON APSOF HE14
BARGAIN HOURS NOW IN EFFECT A1A UN4:cTRE930
O-f- 1AWhat hoppened DAILY
puBER ISL AND 7 :15 9:15

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INDIVIDUAL T
5th Ave. of Liberty

EATRES
761.9700

STARTS
FRIDAY

I

IL .-.OF

Walesa
... elected as Union chief
The Communist Party daily Trybuna
Dudu called for "immediate anti-crisis
steps," including a "crisis tax" on
alcohol, cigarettes, gasoline, textiles
and furs.
Meanwhile, Hungary's communist-
run unions asked for talks with
Solidarity, the first independent labor
federation in the Soviet bloc.
Bronislaw Geremek, a chief adviser
to Solidarity, said the Hungarians sent
a letter Sept. 23 as a "friendly gesture"
expressing readiness "to hold talks any
time and discuss the role and vocation
of trade unions."
The letter, written by Hungarian
union chief Sandor Gaspar and read at
Solidarity's congress,- criticized
Solidarity's support for free union ac-
tivity throughout the bloc as "anti-
socialist and anti-Soviet."

From the very beginning, they knew
they'd be friends to the end.
What they didn't count on was everything
in between.

RICH
FAMOUS
(R)
Jacqueline Bisset
Candice Bergen

, .

I I

U

DODAK'

...........

A REVALIN

r

hree
s

When they met they
heard bells. And that w s-
JOHN BELUSHI &'
BLAIR BROWNs'
CONTINENTAL
DIVDE
A UNIVERSAL
® PITE

A REVEALING
COMEDY

Aw'

RYA.N O'NFAL
JACK WARDEN
a Fd
(Upper Level)
MON, TUE, THUR 7:40-9:40
SUN, WED 1:40-4:40-7:40-9:40

THIS
ONE
FREE

(Upper Level)
MON, TUE. THUR 7:00-9:30
SUN, WED, 1:05-4:05-7:00-9:30

ROGER
MOORE
FOR
YOUR,
EYES
ONLY
S UNITEI
ARTISTS

Lt

SUN WED 1:35-4:3-7:35 :35
BURT REYNOLDSIN
PATERNITY
PG

- I

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----Ndff

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