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October 04, 1981 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1981-10-04

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Page 2-Sunday, October 4, 1981-The Michigan Daily
Sli*m budgets
create crowds
in classrooms

IN BRIEF

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TUSDA Y LUNCH-DISCUSSION
OcTOGER 6-12 NOON
"UGANDA AND.
ITS PREDICAMENT"
Speaker: OMARI KOKOLE
At the INTERNA O/NAL CENTER
603 E. Madison Street
Lunch $1.00
For additional information please call 662-5529
737 N. Huron, Ypsilanti
n465-0240
44r Sands and
+rink Spacials,
Mon.-TAU KAPPA EPSILON and LAMBDA CHI ALPHA Pre-
sent THE FALL BASH. Cheap pitcher prices. Liquor specials.
VIDEO SHOW with top recording artists on our 10 foot
screen.
Tue.-5 for 1 Drink Prices on some drinks. $1.00
before 9:30 p.m. Appearing again-
STEVE KING AND THE DITTILIES
Wed.--LADIES FREE; Guys $1.00 before 9:30 p.m. 2 for 1
on drinks;
Thurs.-ALPHA GAMMA DELTA. Party Night. Pitcher
specials. HUGE CROWDS! !
Fri. & Sat.-HAPPY HOUR till 10:00 p.m. No
cover before 9:00 p.m. One-half cover between 9-9:30
p.m. Don't miss RADIO CITY

(Continued from Page 1)
"Fair" translates into waiting lists,
administered by the department.
Students who want an override into a
closed math class must verify their spot
on the wait list every day by going to
the department's offices. I
"IF SOMEONE fails to do so, we
assume they are not as interested as
someone else," Zukowski said. "They
are dropped from the list."
He said it is not unheard of for a
hopeful student to attend a section for
several weeks, completing assignmen-
ts, taking exams, and verifying their
spot on the wait list daily, only to be
denied a spot in the course.
"Even though the instructor might be
willing to let them in, in order to keep
the agreement, we are not permitted to
give out an override unless someone
drops the course," he said. "What can
we do if we're given insufficient resoui-
ces to offer enough sections?"
SOME STUDENTS suggest the best
solution for overcrowded lecture
classes would be to let as many studen-
ts into the course as there are seats
available.
"If you can fit another desk in the
room, take them in," LSA junior Dan
Koster said. "A lot of the problem is
just people being inconsiderate in a lec-
ture and spreading out, over a couple
seats so they can have elbow room.'"
Some departments are more than
willing to take that attitude.

"IT'S UP TO the professor how many
he wants," said Janet Rgse, an ad-
ministrative assistant in the history
department. "We'll open it up forever if
he's willing."
In many departments, if a professor
would like to admit more students but
the classroom itself is too small, de-
partment officials will do what they can
to schedule the course into a larger
room.
Oberle said that at the beginning of
the term, every seat in all her
engineering classes was taken, forcing
many students to sit on the floor and,
when that space filled, lean up against
the walls.
"Now they're just full," she said. "I
think the majority of it is people just
not going to discussion anymore.''
Scheduling officials within the
College of Engineering seem to have
come to the same conclusion. They
realize that even though the over-
crowding problem diminishes during
the term, there will be major dif-
ficulties when finals come around.
"We're having trouble finding class
space now," said Assistant to the Dean
Elaine Harder. "But our main problem
will be final exams. The honor code
calls for seating in every other seat. We
haven't figured out how we're going to
do that yet."

'All savers' a success

United Press International reports
Islamic hardliner wins
Iranian elections
BEIRUT, Lebanon- Islamic hardliner Ali Khamenei trounced token op-
position in Iran's third presidential election to become the Islamic republic's
first clergyman head of state, Tehran radio reported yesterday.
It also announced the execution of 30 more foes of Ayatollah Ruhollah
Khomeini's rule, and said government troops had wiped out the last urban
stronghold of autonomy-seeking Kurds.
Sources in Tehran, meanwhile, said revolutionary police and leftist op-
ponents clashed in the capital city. A resident contacted by phone from
Beirut said, "A lot of ambulances are going back and forth, and at least one
person has been killed." No other details were immediately available.
Khamenei, leader of the ruling Islamic Republican Party and survivor of
an assassination attempt, won nearly 96 percent of the 8.3 million votes
tallied so far in Friday's balloting, the state-run radio said. The other votes
were scattered among three other candidates.
State storm damage estimate;
exceeds half a billion dollars
Michigan officials waited yesterday for the last of the floodwaters to
recede before estimating the damage, believed to be well over half a billion
dollars, caused by torrential rains throughout the state this week.
Gov. William Milliken asked President Reagan to declare the southern
half of the Lower Peninsula a disaster area after nearly nine inches of rain
caused one death, destroyed property and crops and caused toxic chemicals
from a waste plant to run off into a river.
Officials say floods in southeastern Michigan forced-evacuation of residen-
ts in three counties, caused power losses to about 100,000 homes and flooded-
expressways near Detroit up to car rooftops.
In farm areas, bean, corn and sugar beet fields that had not been har-
vested were washed away or remained underwater yesterday, completely
destroying the crops.
Peking pushes peace initiative
PEKING- China advanced its Taiwan peace initiative yesterday, of-
fering sanctuary to Nationalist Chinese aircraft and ships and spelling out '
tentative arrangements for opening air, sea and mail links with the
breakaway island.
The elaboration on the peace package made by National People's
Congress chairman Ye Jianying was put forward by the three top officials in
charge of aviation, communications and the post office.
They spelled out in more detail Ye's call for "the exchange of mails, trade,
air and shipping services and visits by relatives and tourists as well as
academic, cultural and sports exchanges" in the quest for unity with
Taiwan.
Alleged self-abortionist
could get 14-year sentence
CHICAGO- A teen-ager who allegedly shot herself in the abdomen to
terminate a six-month pregnancy has been indicted under a state abortion
law and could face 14 years in prison if convicted.
Lorrie Gray, 18, of suburban Robbins, was indicted Friday by a Cook
County grand jury on charges of violating a 1975 Illinois law that prohibits
abortions outside of hospitals after the first three months of pregnancy.
Also indicted was Nicholas Hamilton, 18, who was allegedly involved in the
September shooting incident and is believed to be the woman's boyfriend, of-
ficials said. : ,
A female fetus died as a result of the shooting, authorities said.
William Oplatka, an assistant state's attorney, sairyesterday that the
case may be the first in which the state law has been used to indict anyone on.
abortion charges.
"The law doesn't provide for murder charges in this type of incident,"
Oplatka said. "In this case, nobody did anything to her, she did it to herself.
Vol. XCII, No. 22
Sunday, October 4, 1981
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109. Sub-
scription rates: $12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail
outside Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday
mornings. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7 by mail outside Ann
Arbor. Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109.
The Michigan Daily is a member of theAssociated Press and subscribes to United Press International,
Pacific News Service. Los Angeles Times Syndicate and Field Newspapers Syndicate.
News room: (313) 764-0552, 76-DAILY. Sports desk, 764.0562, Circulation, 764-0558. Classified advertising

WASHINGTON (UPI) - Some banks
stayed open yesterday to accommodate
a rush of customers eager to buy tax-
free "All Savers" certificates before
the interest rate dips tomorrow.
The certificates went on sale Oct. 1 as
part of President Reagan's economic
recovery plan to persuade Americans
RELIGION IS
THEPROBLEM,
NOT THE
ANSWER
Information Packet
Send $1.00 to
American Atheists
P. O. Box 2117
Austin, TX 78768

to give up their "buy now because it will
be more expensive later" philosophy
and instead save their money.
BASED ON A Treasury bill formula,
the certificates purchased before
tomorrow will provide 12.61 percent in-
terest. Tomorrow, the rate will fall to
12.14 percent.
Financial houses said many who
came to ask questions Thursday were
back with money in their hands Friday.
To take care of the response, some
banks extended Friday night hours and
took the unusual step of opening yester-
day.
One reason for the savings push, the
administration explains, is that half the
battle of curbing inflation is to
minimize the public's "inflationary
psychology."
The All Savers certificate is available
at local banks, savings and loan com-
panies and credit unions through Dec.
31, 1982.

ECTVE EMPLOYER
Y y RESUME OF
MOM A. PROSP

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Standard Oil of California

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APPLICANT:
ADDRESS.

225 Bush Street94104o
n Francisco, California

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Attn: Coordinator tobreathe,
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Hire th etm ae us.
and see where they t . - EXPERIENCE

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A FEW HIGH

. Frd Tethingcalled a cable drill,
Fred Taylor, usi Won depth of 560 feet.
1hock gives way to oil.
Rock giveocwayking processes,
odern hyisocoammercialized,
1959. The first of the modern s, iscackin oilceaess
developed by Socal researcherst omed
providing an econdemands
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764-0557. Displ'ay advertising, 764.0554, Billing 764-0550.
Editor in chief . ................... SARA ANSPACH
Managing Editor.............. JULIE ENGEBRECHT
University Editor ................ LORENZO ENET
News Editor...................... DAVID MEYER
Opinion Page Editors .............. KEVIN TOTTIS
CHARLES THOMSON
Sports Editor.................MARK MtHANOVIC
Associate Sports Editors........... GREG DeGULIS
MARK FISCHER
BUDDY MOOREHOUSE
DREW SHARP
Chief Photographer.............PAUL ENGSTROM
ARTISTS: Robert Lence, Norm Christiansen. Jonathan
Stewart.
PHOTOGRAPHERS: Jackie Bell, Kim Hill, Deborah
Lewis, Mike Lucas, Brian Mosck.
MAGAZINE/ARTS STAFF: Jane Carl, Mark Dighton,
Adam Knee. Pam Kramer. Gail Negbour. Howard
Witt.
NEWS STAFF: John Adam. Beth Allen. Doug Brice,
CorolChaltron, Andrew Chapman. Lisa Crumrine.
Debi Davis. Ann Marie Fazio. Pam Fickinger. Maureen
Fleming, Denise Franklin. Joyce Frieden, Mark Gin-
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SPORTS STAFF: Barb Barker. Randy Berger, Mark
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Sarah Sherber, James Thompson, Kent Wolley, Chris
Wilson, Bob Wojrowski.
BUSINESS STAFF
Business Manager................RANDI CIGELNIK
.Sales Manager ................. BARB FORSLUND
Operations Manager.............. SUSANNE KELLY
Display Manager...........MARY ANN MISIEWICZ
Ciassifieds Manager..............DENISE SULLIVAN
Finance Manager ...............MICHAEL YORICK
Assistant Disolov Manager .......... NANCY JOSLIN
Nationals Manager............SUSANRABUSHKA
Circulation Manager..................KIM WOODS
Sales Coordinator............E. ANDREW PETERSEN
BUSINESS STAFF: Liz Altman, Hope Barron, Lindsay
Bray, Joe Brodo, Alexander DePillis, Aido Eisenstadt,
Susan Epps, Wendy Fox. Sandy Frcka, Pamela Gould,.
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refinery.capacity d u e gs SOCa
With construction and installation directory socal
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ACyIVITIES:
REFERENCES:

employees worldwide.

PUBLICATION SCHEDULE
1981
SMTWT F S SMT WT F S SMT WT F S SMT WT F S
1 2 3 1 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 5
101112 4 6 7 8 9 10 8 1011 121314 6 8$9 10,1112
13 16 17 18 19 1 1314 151617 151 178 t192021
. 20 223 24 25 26 18 20 21 22 23 24 22 24 256 8- -a0 As-e2
2930 2 627 28 29 30 31
JANUA____E_ UA82 ___C_1AP_2
JANUARY FEBRUARY 1MARCH APRIL

40,0001

Chevron
Standard Oil Company
of California

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