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September 26, 1981 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-09-26

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It's only rock 'n roll AP Photo
The shrieks and screams of 90,000 fans greet the Rolling Stones at John F. Kennedy nounced and scalpers got as much as $75 before the show. The Stones are expected
Stadium in Philadelphia on the opening show of their 40-day U.S. tour, which in- to play before 1.5 million people on the tour, which will make the five men $25
cludes a stop at the Pontiac Silverdome on Nov. 30 and Dec. 1. Although it's only million richer by the time they leave the States.
rock 'n roll, all of the $17 tickets were sold within days after the concert was an-

Woodcock criticizes
(Continued from Page 1)

there (at the Solidarity march)
probably voted for Reagan and now
they're having second thoughts,"
Woodcock said.
"REAGAN'S ACTION toward PAT-
CO was ruthless," Woodcock said.
Labor unions, large and small, must
stick together for added strength, he
said. For this reason, Woodcock said he

supports the merger of the AFL-CIO
and the UAW, increasing the political
clout of both organizations.
On the subject of the American auto
industry, Woodcock said that although
he foresees an eventual recovery of the
stricken industry, he does not believe
that it will ever be able to completely
regain its former dominance in
American and world business.

Leagan lab(
"It's pretty obvious," Woodcock said,
"in terms of the numbers employed,
that the industry will never be what it
was at its peak in '77 and '78."
"THE BIGGEST problem facing the
industry now is the collapse of the
market and the high interest rates," he
said, adding that General Motors, the
largest of the Big Four auto makers -
appears to be on the road tp restoring

r policy
its market through its introduction of
smaller cars.
Woodcock said he is pleased with his
new post at the University. "Coming to
Ann Arbor makes a great deal of sen-
se," he said. "It has a first-rate Chinese
Studies Center and it's right at the
heart of the automobile industry." "It's
different in Ann Arbor, but I've ad-
justed."

IN-BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
Polish workers win right
to name factory bosses
WARSAW, Poland- Polish workers won the right to join the Communist
government in naming and approving factory directors yesterday, but the
new law may face an immediate challenge from Solidarity unionists who
want a larger-voice in how factories are run.
Trouble broke out in the coal fields, with 5,000 to 7,000 miners striking in
southwestern Silesia after a dispute with pro-government union leaders led
to the arrest of a Solidarity mine leader, Solidarity said.
The dispute was over a statement by the pro-government "branch" union
in the area. The Solidarity leader at the Sosnice mine was seized and
charged with limiting the freedom of the rival union.
The bill on workers' self-management, a compromise between the desires
of the government and Solidatiry, was passed with 15 abstentions but no
negative votes in the 460-member Parliament.
Reagan warns Senate
about AWACS sale veto
WASHINGTON- A Senate veto of the proposed sqle of AWACS to Saudi
Arabia would mean "literally doing away with our ability to bring peace to
the Middle East," President Reagan warned yesterday.
Reagan also confirmed he is trying to persuade reluctant senators to ap-
prove the controversial $85. billion arms package for Saudi Arabia "without
presuming the goodwill" of the Arab kingdom.
Saudi Arabia, its arips purchase in congressional jeopardy, weighed
yesterday a compromise that would give Americans joint operational con-
trol of AWACS radar planes.
Falling market fault
of Reaganomics, expert says
NEW YORK- Stock and bond prices plunged and interest rates rose on
the nation's financial markets yesterday, a sign that President Reagan's
budget-cutting plans won't soon rid Wall Street of its pessimistic outlook for
the economy, analysts said.
Market guru Joseph Granville (compounded investor) expressed disap-
pointment over President Reagan's latest budget-cutting proposals, predic-
ting Sept.28 would be "a blue Monday" in U.S. financial history.
The Dow Jones average of 30 industrial stocks, which has fallen by about
20 percent since April, lost 11.03 points to 824.11 through 3:30 p.m. EDT.
Long-term bond prices lost as much as 2 points, or $20 for each $1,000 in face
value.
South African rubgy team
plays surprise game
GLENVILLE, N.Y.- South Africa's Springboks rugby team, their U.S.
tour marred by demonstrations and bombings, yesterday played a surprise
game in this Schenectady suburb and officials said it would be the con-
troversial team's final match.
Earlier yesterday, a bomb destroyed the clubhouse of an Evansville, Ind.,
rugby team that had been trying to line up a match with the Springboks. In-
vestigators said the explosion was caused by some kind of firebomb, but they
had no suspects.
No one was injured, but three neighboring houses were damaged by fire.
On Tuesday, a bomb exploded in the Schenectady, N.Y. offices of the
Eastern Rugby Union, sponsors of the Springboks U.S. tour.
Yesterday's match was played on Kant's Polo Field against the US.
Eagles, an all-star team. ~~antteUS
There were no incidents at the game, officials aid. Only several state
police and very few spectators stood by as the Springboks whipped the
Eagles 38-7.
Vol. XCII, No. 15
Saturday, September 26, 1981
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesdaythrough Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, -Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109. Sub-
scription rates: $12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail
outside Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday
mornings. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7 by mail outside Ann
Arbor. Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109.
Ike Michigan Dily is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to United Press Ipternational.
Pacific News Service. Los Angeles Times Syndicate and Field Newspapers Syndicate.
News room: (313) 764-0552, 76-DAILY. Sports desk. 764-0562. Circulation, 764.0558, Classified advertising

0
0
S

Continuous meal service popular at Markley

(Continued from Pagel1),I
students, the housing office will ask the
Student Rate Committee next springs
for a hike in the cost of a meal ticket.
Another problem that has to be ironed
out is that the Markley kitchen
.sometipnes runs out of posted menu
items fore the day is over and has
had to use substitute items. "We're still
in the adjustment process," Kluck said.
South Quad, which expanded its din-
ner hor until 8 p.m. has had its own
problems. "We don't feel it'sworking
out that well," kitchen supervisor John

Moore said.
AN AVERAGE of ,150 students a day
are coming into the cafeteria between
6:30and7:30, but after 7:30 the average
is only 15, Moore said. "We're finding
the numbers are very few, for the
money we spend to do it (stay open until
8 p.m.)."' Last year, South Quad's
cafeteria was open until 7 p.m.
Another South Quad supervisor,
Mary Woods, agreed with Moore, but
said, "I think the number will increase
as more people findeout about it."

Kluck said student response to the hot
breakfast at Markley has been steady,
averaging 185 students a day, but "we
expected a little more" than that, he
said.
SOME OF THE students interviewed
by the Daily said they would eat break-
fast if it was served in their own dorm,
but most said they preferred to skip
breakfast.
Kluck said he has been getting some
positive responses to the extra hours,
but he can't make a judgement about

student response because "someone
apparently walked off with the com-
ment box," he said, but "from the
students I've spoken to, they seem to
like it a lot." The "early risers"
especially like the breakfast, Kluck
said.

Lawyer
wants..

53,

Qrburb hrnlip 'Et~EE0trial moved
ch (Continued from Pa ge 1

fr

LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
(The Campus Ministry'
of the LCa-ALC-AELC)
Gordon Ward, Pastor
801. Forest at HillSt.
Sunday Worship at 10:30a.m.
Wednesday 7:00 p.m. Choir practice.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.-662-4466
Service of Worship:
Sunday 9:30 and 11:00 a.m.
Student Fellowship meets at 5:30
p.m..
Wednesday: Breakfast, 7:00a.m.
Bible Study 8:45 p.m.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw Ct.
A Campus Ministry of the
Christian Reformed Church
Rev. Don Postema, Pastor
10:00 a.m. Morning Worship
6:00p.m. Evening Worship.
7:15 p.m. Mixer/Supper.
Wednesday: ,
10:00 p.m. Evening Prayers.

UNIVERSITY CHURCH
OF THE NAZARENE
409 South Division
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Rev. Steve Bringardner, 761-5941
Christian Education 9:45 a.m.
Service of Worship-11:00 a.m.
"Time of Meeting"-6:00 p.m.
* * *
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH and
AMERICAN BAPTIST CAMPUS
FOUNDATION
502 East Huron 663-9376
Jitsuo Mqrikawa, Pastor
10:00 a.m.-Sunday Worship. Child
care provided.
Sept. 27: "Building For The Future,"
Dr. Carroll Arnold preaching.
11:00 a.m.-Church School. Classes
for all ages. Class for undergraduates.
Class for graduates and faculty.
Also:
Choir Thursday 7:00 p.m., John Reed,
director.
Student Study Group. Thurs., 6:00
p.m.
Support group for bereaved students,
alternate Weds. 7 p.m.
11:00 BRUNCH, SECOND Sunday of
each month.
Ministry Assistants: Nadean Bishop,
Terry Ging, Barbara Griffin, Jerry
Rees.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
120 S. State St.
(Corner of State and Huron)
Worship Schedule:
8:30 a.m.-Holy Communion in the
Chapel.
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Morning Wor-
ship in the Sanctuary.
Sermon for Sept. 27-"Prayer In The
Public Schools?" by Dr. Donald Strobe.
Church School for all ages-9:30 a.m.
and 11a.m. 4
Choir Rehearsal-Thursday at 7:15
p.m.
Ministers:
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
Rev. Fred B. Maitland
Dr. Gerald R. Parker
Education Directors :
Rose McLean and Carol Bennington
* * *
NEW GRACE APOSTOLIC CHURCH
632 N. Fourth Ave.
Rev. Avery Dumas Jr., Pastor
9:45 a.m. Sunday School.
11:45 Morning Worship
Bible Study-Wed: & Fri. 7 p.m.
For rides call 761-1530t
* * *
ANN ARBOR MISSIONARY CHURCH
2118 Saline-Ann Arbor Rd. 668-6640
Rev. Marvin L. Claasen, Pastor
10:00 a.m. Sunday School
11 a.m. & 6 p.m. Worship Service
7:00 p.m. Wed. Bible Study & Prayer
A Cordial Welcome to All
* * *
ST. MARY'S
STUDENT CHAPEL _
(Catholic)
331 Thompson-663-0557
Weekly Masses:
Mon.-Wed.-5:10p.m.
Thurs.-Fri.-12:10 p.m.
Sat.-7:00 p.m.
Sun.-8:30 and 10:30 a.m. (Upstairs
and downstairs)
12 noon and 5 p.m. (upstairs and
downstairs)
North Campus Mass at 9:30 a.m. in

A FIRST-DEGREE murder convic-
tion automatically carries a life senten-
ce. A second-degree murder conviction,
however, can result in a maximum sen-
tence of life imprisonment, but there is
an opportunity for parole.
If the charge is reduced, Waterman
may ask for bond to be set for Kelly.
Kelly is currently being held without
bond at Washtenaw County Jail.
Waterman will be renewing his
motion for discovery, filed earlier in the
preliminary exams, he said. This type
of motion demands that any evidence
the prosecution has which could have
some bearing on the case be turned
over to the defense.
Campbell must now set a date for a
hearing for the motions.

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leo

'W HY DO TH E H EATH EN RAGE?'
Psalm 2:1 and Acts 4:25
What favorable response there has been to the articles In this column have
had mostly one common note running through them. They seem to say in one
Way or another: "Keep it up." May we urge and suggest that all who approve.
of them generally, or can say "amen," that they please pray earnestly,
regularly, definitely, and persistently, that God would convert the heathen.
in the Second Psalm after saying: "Yet have I set My King upon My holy hill
of Zion," God also says: "Ask of me, and I shall give Thee the heathen for
Thine inheritance." Pray especially for the "unbelieving heathen" and clergy
who have gotten into God's inheritance, The Church, "crept in unawares;"
those attacking The Word of God, The Deity of Christ, His Virgin Birth,
Miracles, The Resurrection, etc. - "The woods are full of them!" Such
heathen have just about usurped the top positions and authority in our great
and beloved Protestant Denominations, and The Church is in captivity again,
another Babylonian captivity!"For the leaders of this people cause them to
err; and they that are led of them are destroyed." Isaiah 9:16. (Verse 17
following says: "Therefore The Lord shall have no joy in their young men."
I read in the Papers of a vounn man In a naarhv town who ahnt tn dath his

Computers stolen
Computer equipment valued at more
than $9,000 was stolen from Tec-
Education Technical Publications and
Graphics' Services, 1900 Pauline, bet-
ween 5:30 p.m. Sept. 18 and 8 a.m. Sept.
20, police reported yesterday. There
was no sign of forced entry, but two
computers, accessories, two
typewriters and two TVs were taken,
police said.
Break-in at S. State
An apartment on the 500 block of S.
State was broken-into on Thursday,
police said. The thief, who came in
through an open window, took a brief-
case, a Panasonic tape recorder and a
man's gold bracelet and chain.

PUBLICATION SCHEDULE
1981
SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER
3-23-4-6 121 34 5 67 1 2 3 4 5
101112 4 6 7 8 9 10 a 0117721314 6 89n101112
15 16 17 18 19 11 13 14 15 16 7 151 '1718 1920 21 -4 4
2729 30186 27 2829 303 22 1
______1982 f
JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL
S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S

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