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September 11, 1981 - Image 132

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The Michigan Daily, 1981-09-11

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Page 12-B- Friday, September 11, 1981-The Michigan Daily

Begin your day
with
C be 17ai 5
764-0558

Pot

endangers

health, AMA says

NEW YORK (UPI) - Is the medical heat
still on marijuana?
You bet, claims the American Medical
Association's new "Drug Abuse" handbook for
doctors seeking guidance on marijuana.
No matter what you may have heard, no mat-
ter how high the status of marijuana on the
college or social circuit, marijuana is a
dangerous drug, says the AMA, with great
potential for serious harm to young American
users.
THE HANDBOOK HAD this to say about
marijuana:
. Target organ for marijuana is the brain.
Structural changes occur in the brain with
marijuana use, as well as changes in the pat-
terns of brain waves. Acute marijuana in-
toxication impairs learning, memory, thinking,
comprehension and general intellectual per-
formance. Even at moderate levels of social

use, driving skills are impaired.
" Marijuana smoke contains larger amounts
of cancer-causing hydrocarbons than tobacco
smoke. With daily use, lung damage can ap-
pear in three months. Bronchitis and em-
physema are common in regular users.
" THE MOST MARKED effect on heart and
circulation is an increase in heart rate. Up to
140 heartbeats per minute is not uncommon
under marijuana influence.
" Chronic use of marijuana may be
associated with disruption of the menstrual
cycle and at least temporary infertility.
Miscarriage is more common among users.
Among lab animals, sperm abnormalities have
been noted, along with damage to the male
reproductive organs.
" Many physicians experienced in treating
drug abusers believe that regular marijuana
use may seriously interfere with psychological

functioning, personality development, and
emotional growth and learning, especially in
childhood and adolescence.
*Large doses can induce hallucinations,
delusions and paranoid feeligs. Thinking
becomes confused and disoriented. The initial
effect, euphoria, may give way to panic.
So why do people use marijuana? Users, says
the AMA, report a feeling of euphoria and well
being, fellings of relaxation and heightened
sexual arousal, vivid imagery and a keen sense
of hearing. Senses of tast, touch and smell may
be enhanced. Time seems to move more
slowly.
THE AMA HANDBOOK notes several
therapeutic uses suggested for THC, the active
ingredient in marijuana.
The list includes asthma, glaucoma, and
nausea from cancer drug treatment. The AMA

noted, further, that medical use of maijuana i
clinical research is now authorized in some
states.
The AMA opposes legalization of marijuana,
saying:
"Legislators should keep in mind the
primary need to give young people a clear
message that marijuana use may be hazardous
and is not sanctioned or endorsed by society."
The AMA says street marijuana has in-
creased markedly in potency over the past five
years. Prior to 1975 it rarely exceeded 1 percent
of THC. In 1979, concentrations of 5 percent
were not uncommon.
The AMA also said hash oil, a marijuana ex-
tract not on the scene 10 years ago, has a THC
content of 15 to 20 percent. And street grades of
hashish concentrated marijuana preparations
have THC content of about 10 percent.

Volunteer At University Hospital
COME EXPLORE: Attend an information session to learn about the more than
60 opportunities in.
Main/Parkview Hospitals
Mott Children's/Womenis/Holden Hospitals
Psychiatric Hospitals
Ambulatory Care Services
Motor Meals of Ann Arbor
WHERE: Main Hospital, 6th Floor Amphitheater
WHEN: September 14, 17& 22-7:00 p.m.
FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL 763-6710

**(********************
"Gimme a D *
Gimme an A
Gimme an L...L...Y
Give the MICHIGAN DAILY:
that old college try.
CALL 764-0558 to order your subscription

BRA vs.

MBA:

I

making the choice

By MARK GINDIN
While the bachelor of business admin-
istration degree (BBA) may be a very
good value, if a person's ambitions lie
in the fast lane of corporate ascension,
the master of business adminsitration
(MBA) may be the best choice, accor-
ding to a placement officer in the
University's School of Business.
The BBA teaches more of the "nuts
and bolts" of business, while the MBA
goes further into business policies and
corporate strategy, which are both
long-run, comprehensive concepts, said
the director of the Business School
Placement Office, Peggy Carroll.
HOLDERS OF AN MBA degree
usually have more maturity, self-
confidence, and drive than a BBA
graduate does upon graduation, said
Carroll. Businesses are aware of the
differences when they begin recruiting
graduates, she said.
For instance, most consulting agen-
cies, a major part of the public accoun-
ting service offered by many firms,
only hire MBA graduates because of
their maturity, said James Rumbsa of
Peat, Marwick, Mitchell, & Co., a
Detroit accounting firm.
About half of the students who
graduate with a BBA degree go into
public accounting, Carroll said,
because the field offers the supervision,
teamwork, and feedback that most
younger, less experienced graduates
need.
,COMPETITION FOR jobs requiring
MBA graduates has increased because
the degree "is becoming more common
now than it was 10 years ago," said
Carroll, adding that students are
realizing it is necessary in order to
move up to the top.
Retailers, such as Hudson's and Lord
& Taylor department stores, put the
BBA graduates into management
training programs for two years to
acquaint them with the store
operations, Carroll said. They often
find this method is cheaper than hiring
an MBA, she added.
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or home for
under $50.00.
You can protect yourself
and your valuables.
For more information on this
new, space-age, electronic
device
Call 483-3810
day or night
20th Century
Competent Alarms

"THE TREND IN banking is to looli
at BBA's "more than in the past," said
Carroll. Banks often have training.
programs that end up being cheaper.
than hiring an MBA, she said, but the
trust and commercial loan departmen-
ts still hire mainly MBA grads.
Although BBA's are hi-ed into the ae
counting, retailing, banking, and sal
departments of businesses, Carroll said
she did not see a trend toward in6
creased hiring of BBA graduates
overall.
The major advantages of an MBA
degree are the ;naturity and drive;
their exposure to problem-solving, and
writing skills, said *umbsa. The ability
to communicate I an important
criteria, and comes afoss in the intel
views, which average about half an
hour, he said.
The manufacturing industry hires
mainly MBA graduates for their finan?
ce, personnel, and marketing positions
said Carroll. These companies "usually
don't have a training program for
MBAs, but a few; such as Texas In-
struments and TRW do," she said.
CONSULTING and investment
banking take only MBAs because 'o
their exposure, business experience;
and insight, said Carroll.
The interview is the final deter
minant in hiring a graduate for a job,
said Carroll. All of the student's ac-
complishments-such as grades and'
extracurricular activities-are finally
articulated to the hiring representatiye
during the interview, said Carroll.
"The interview is exceedingly imyor-
tant," said Rumbsa. The applicant has
the opportunity to project oneself an
impress on the recruiter one'.
motivation and drive, he said, whicl
may be the difference between getting
ajob or not.
University of Michigan graduates
rank among the highest in the nation.
academically, according to a recent.
survey. The University's program was
ranked second in the nation among both
college deans and personnel executives
around the nation, rated behind only the.
University of Pennsylvania.
"IT IS A mistake for a new BBA
graduate to go directly into an MB
program in my opinion," said Carroll.
There is no harm in getting a BBA,
working for a couple of years, then
deciding on an MBA later, she said.
"I wouldalso not encourage a BBA
from here to get an MBA here," Carroll
said. An undergraduate degree and a.
graduate degree from the same in-.
stitution is not advisable, she said
because the programs may be simila4
and diversity is better for the student.
Entering freshmen should get in-
volved in school activities, Carroll said,
not just because it looks good on an ap-
plication, but because all experience is
beneficial. It is helpful to demonstrate
leadership abilities while in school, she
said
Grades, while important; are not
worth the time many students spend on
them, Carroll said. A social life is
desirable because the business world
has many social events, and practice
helps, she said.
This story was reprinted from the
Daily's summer edition.

Daily's summer edition.

m

Al

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