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September 11, 1981 - Image 110

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-09-11

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6

OPINION

Page 4-A
a stganty Mig
Edited and managed by'students at The University of Michigan

Vol; XCII, No. 2

420 Maynard St.
Ann Arbor, M1 48109

Friday, September 11, 1981
Weasel
MOvING ALON&
N OR OR )FNTAI
ToUR., ON youc.K
TOWRS .h
l Rr FAMOUS cAM~Pus
I..ANTPMAg4 .
t J~

Editorials represent a majority opinion of the Daily's Editorial Board
A Shapiro surprise?

ARE ANN Pf.Of's OWN
s T1ZEr pEOPLE if- A cOL.Ey11Owj
" TM ?NE~f 601 APE OVER:
y - Y

S PONT (ONT)STA Np, SIR.
R? THEY TUT STAY I4.RE. ALL PAY
WMY DONE 714EY Au. 60 OLT AND)
e&er zn8gs.? TERĀ£ARE PM~ENTY of
OI'kNIN"sIN THE CO~fpuTV.i F RJ-..vs.
PANT W~*tiTHCOc F4NPOF .oe.
THEY COME FQOM A 6.fAERA10J
TH4AT BELIEVED IN 7T(N6S 1"4
W0RL p PEKE, UL"*N R16*rS.,4iMm-
CA41At4SM . ..1'ft IrNS LKE '7fAr
( of} ""

The Michigan Daily
By Robert Lence
WiA 'WEE' THY, SC"
WELL, Y(ES, F4CZ
(TH4E M 5oT PART
&rr A Soo, You Buis.
' , L ' a ' 1
F .- * . / v

I

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S~INCE UNIVERSITY President.
Harold Shapiro began touting his'
"smaller but better" plan for the
University, he hasi often mentioned the
need for cutting the enrollment. Unfor-
tynately, neither Shapiro, nor his
second in command in academic af-,
fairs, Vice President Bill Frye, has of-
fered any concrete plan to limit
enrollment and has, thus far, left most
of the University community in the
dark.
The administrators could have a
good point. As the University gets
smnaller; there may be a need to
rmarkedly decrease the number of in-
caming students. However, a realistic
picture of the effects of fewer students
cannot be clear unless the ad-
inistrators solicit and acknowledge
t1 input of faculty and students.
larlier this summer, Shapiro told
the Daily that enrollment limitations
are a distinct possibility for the 1982
academic year and that ad-
ninistrators will be giving the reduc-
tns serious consideration this fall.
" e can't cut staff without cutting
students as well," he said.
But Shapiro must realize that the
issue is not so clear cut. Eric Rabkin,
L-A associate dean for long range

planning, said that college's faculty
has 'continuously voted against
decreasing enrollment if it means a
lower quality institution.
It should be clear to the ad-
ministrators that the University com-
munity is not only interested in the
"what" of enrollment cuts, but the
"how" and "why" as well. If ad-
ministrators spring an announcement
of pending cuts on faculty and studen-
ts, without significant prior input and
strong reasoning for the decision, they
can expect a battle throughout, the
University.
Possibly, Shapiro and Frye and the
other administrators have learned
from experience with the elimination
of the geography department: A
momentous decision regarding the
future of the University cannot appear
predetermined by a handful of ad-
ministrators. All members of the
University community must have the
opportunity to be heard and to par-
ticipate actively in decisions of, this
kind. If the administrators choose to
ignore this again, they will not only
deprive the students and faculty of a
right they deserve in an academic set-
ting, but will do education in the state
a disservice.

L

y11 1 1 11pA /I

Space travel on a budget

IV
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The changes of October
HILE THE Reagan administra- severely restrict the ability of middle-
tion's desire to cut waste from class households to obtain the loans.
ral student aid programs is com- The significance of Oct. 1 has not
dable, its actions seem aimed not -been lost on the hundreds of students
ouch at cutting waste as cutting who-in an attempt to beat the
ey from the federal budget with deadline-have deluged the University
regard for any long-term con- Office of Financial Aid with loan ap-
ences. plications.{
r the more than 3 million Although it is too early to tell exactly
rican students who are debtors what will be, the effect of the Reagan
r the federal Guaranteed Student changes in student loan programs, the
Program, Oct. 1 will be bad outlook is ominous. One policy analyst
gr n.ad- for the American Council on Education
gh. But now that thead- has estimated that 800,000 to 1 million
stration is preparing to recom-
d additional cuts in student aid to students who currently have loans will
nts, accessibility to institutions of not be eligible under the new rules.
er learning is being threatened What seems clear is that if the ad-
er. ministration is really concerned about
the plight of students who must rely on
Oct. 1, the changes to the GSL the federal government for the con-
ram proposed by the Reagan ad- tinuation of their education, the ad-
stration and passed by the ministration must-at the very
tress will become fully effec- least-wait a while before seeking fur-
-rendering hundreds of thousands ther cuts in aid programs.
e. nation's GSL debtors ineligible Further cuts at this point would be
irther loans through the program. foolish-especially for an ad-
e new rules will require that ministration that will need college
ly financial background be taken educated adults to help tackle all the
account in determining eligibility problems the administration has
uaranteed student loans, and will promised to solve.

By Russ Meredith
with Voyager 1 in deep space and
Voyager 2 not scheduled for another
planetary show until 1986, I figure now would
be a good time to go and visit my old friend,
Dr. Carl Shogun, at the Jet Space
Laboratory..
The receptionist issued me a visitor badge
and instructions on how to get to the main
control center where Carl was working.
JUST AS I had closed the door behind
myself, the large screen at the front of the
room began to light up at one end. An un-
focused picture came into view and a cheer
went up from the technicians at their con-
soles.
"Correct for focus, Fred," I heard Carl or-
der over the babble, "and start a slow pan to
the left."
"Congratulations," I said walking up to
Carl's desk, "I had no idea that a new mission
was on.
"THANKS, RUSS" beamed Carl, pointing
to a seat next to his, "these are pictures from
our Stockman' project. It's not much, but it
keeps us busy."
We sat in silence for several minutes as
Stockman's camera revealed a parched and
colorless landscape that seemed to run on for
miles until it merged with a gray, cloudless
sky=at an almost undiscernable horizon.
"Doesn't that look like a dried up river
bed?" Carl asked. "Judy, I want a hard copy
of that last frame sent over to the geology
team right away."
"I'M PUZZLED about one thing, Carl," I
said, lookingsaway from the screen. "It is too
hot on Venus to land a probe like this, and
Mars has red dirt. Sojust where is Stockman
at?" I asked, my eyes returning to the un-
folding world.
"You're right about Venus and Mars,
Russ," replied Carl. "And with budget
cuts. . ."
"Should we start the soup now, Dr.
Shogun?" called out a voice from the front of
the room.
"Yes, go ahead, Mike," replied Carl,
making a note of the time on a log in front of
him.
"Is this like the Viking life experiments?" I
asked.
"Something like it," said-Carl, "only this
time we are setting out two cups of chicken
noodle and waiting to see what it draws. But
returning to your question, Russ, NASA's
budget cuts have led to some real changes in
our programs. And we've been forced to stay
much closer to home."
I was about to ask if he meant the pictures
were fromh the moon, when the next frame en-
tered the screen. My mind wanted to say the
words, but my mouth froze. There in the mid-
dle of the frame was a large, brown sign with
yellow letters:
"Welcome to Yellowrock National Park.
- The Honorable James Watt, Secretary of the
Interior"
Meredith is a student in the University's
Institute of Public Policy Studies.

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR:

l

I

Cooperation needed for peace

-4'

* -- -

-14TS WHAr
THEY ALL SAY !

'I '

i

:'
'
E-" _

4.4

To the Daily:
The men who run our gover-
nment believe that the United
States has the right, and must
maintain the power, to dominate
world events and control the
world's resources so they directly
benefit the United States. In the
last century, through the use of
military force, the United States
has been able to do this.
Today the world situation is
changed. The supply of resources
is shrinking rapidly and people
are refusing to accept foreign
domination of any kind from any
source. !
This refusal to be dominated is
a diret threaI't t those in ouir

populace also views them as
legitimate tools, not only in the
international sphere, but in their
daily lives. This legitimization of
force is manifested in the violen-
ce in our streets, and the in-
creased abuse of children.
The use of violence is sad. Sad-
der still is the fact that our tax
dollars are being used to finance
violence.
The United States is currently
spending over $200 billion on the
military, with promises of more
to come. Supposedly, the
stronger and bigger our military
is, the more secure we are.
Today, after spending trillions of

health care and housing are of
high quality and accessible to all,
that one is safe from being raped,
beaten or robbed, and that all
have equal opportunity.
Militarism and the quest, for
dominance have led us to the
brink of disaster. International
confrontation will threaten the
survival of the planet, because of

the probability that any conflict
will escalate to all-out nuclear
war.
Cooperation and negotiation.
not force, are the ways to peace,
equality and ultimate security.

0

-Edith C. Hefley
September 8

Letters to the Daily should be;

typed,
margins

triple-spaced, with iy
. All submissions must

nch'
be:

i

Sb

AW

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