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January 19, 1980 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1980-01-19

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Page 2-Saturday, January 19, 1980-The Michigan Daily
OLYMPIC BOARD MEETS WITH CAR TER AIDES:
Panel urges no boycott

WASHINGTON (UPI) - Top officials
of the U.S. Olympic Committee yester-
day met with White House aides to urge
that President Carter decide against
ordering the U.S. team to boycott the
summer Olympics in Moscow.
U.S. Olympic Committee President
'Robert Kane and Executive Director
Don Miller came to Washington from
Colorado Springs, Colo., to meet with
presidential aides.
Press secretary Jody Powell said
Carter, who went to Camp David, Md.,

for the weekend, will decide within the
next several days whether the United
States should boycott the games.
But Powell noted that Carter has
already said he could not support
American participation in the event in
the Soviet Union if Russian troops are
still in Afghanistan. The games are
scheduled for July 19-Aug. 3.
"The president has said on several
occasions that he could not support
American participation in the Olympic
Games in Moscow under the present

Yugoslavia cautions
against interference

circumstances - while Soviet troops
are engaged in a very brutal repression
of the people of Afghanistan," Powell
said in an interview on the NBC-TV
"Today" program.
Kane and Miller are contending that
Carter has no authority to enact a
boycott because the International
Olympic Committee charter specifies
no political leader can make such a
decision.
Miller on Thursday left open the
possibility the USOC might ignore a
boycott order.
He expressed disappointment that
neither he nor any member of his staff
had been consulted during a" week of
pronouncements by administration of-
ficials who publicly discussed the.
possibility of a boycott.
Miller said he hoped that the "impact
on future generations" of a boycott are
fully considered by Carter before he
makes his decision. If a boycott is or-
dered and supported by the Western
nations, Miller said, "that it will be the
demise of the current Olympic
movement."x
Deputy Secretary of State Warren
Christopher found a lot of support
among European allies for a boycott
during his recent trip there, a senior,
administration official said Thursday.
About 50,000 Americans each year
take part in marathon races, a distan-
ce-when measured by Olympic stan-
dards-of 26 miles, 385 yards. # The
original marathon runner supposedly
ran 22 miles, 1,470 yards, the distance a
Greek soldier ran from the battlefield
at Marathon to Athens to report the vic-
tory over the Persians some 2,000 years
ago.

BELGRADE, Yugoslavia (UPI) -
Yugoslavia issued a warning yesterday
against any interferefice in its internal
affairs in the event of the death of ailing
President Josip Broz Tito, 87:
Doctors said Tito's condition has
stabilized, but there was no change in
his, left leg, previously reported as
"gradually deteriorating."
IN A WARNING to both East and
'West - but understood to have been
issued with the Soviet Union uppermost
in mind - Foreign Ministry spokesman
Mirko Kalezic said Yugoslavia is "a
solid and stable com-
munity... capable of preserving and
defending its independence.
"Yugoslavia has never accepted nor
needed anybody's guardianship and
strongly rejects any or all bloc conten-
tions or rivalries concerning either its

internal or international status," he
said.
The foreign ministry statement was
bolstered by a get-well cable sent to
Tito by the Yugoslav army Communist
Party organization, which pledged the
"full unity, readiness and resoluteness
of all army members to jointly ... un-
shakably and decisively defend the
achievement of our revolution, freedom
and territorial integrity."
Another get-well telegram was sent
by Soviet President Leonid Brezhnev,
who wished Tito "an early and com-
plete recovery" and expressed con-
fidence that "Comrade Tito will be able
to work fruitfully for a long time in the
interests of Yugoslavia and Soviet-
Yugoslav friendship," the Tass News
Agency reported from Moscow. .

AP Photo
GOLD FEVER MAY be sweeping the world, but pious meditation goes on
in the Bangkok temple of this golden Buddha. Weighing 5.5 tons and made
of 18-carat gold, this statue was worth more than $100 million at Thursday's
market gold price of $800 an ounce.

(t lic Utxrnbip 'EtUIEE0

NEWPORT FELLOWSHIP
(Free Methodist Church)
1951 Newport Road--665-6100
Sunday School-9:45 a.m.
Worship-11:00 a.m.
(Nursery and Children's Worship).
Evening Worship-6:00 p.m.
Robert Henning, Pastor. 663-9526
CIIURCHI OF SCIENTOLOGY
Huron Valley Mission
809 Henry St.
668-6:113
Sunday Service 2:30 p.m.
Rev. Marian K. Kuhns
* * *
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH
(The Campus Ministry of the ALC-LCA
Gordon Ward, Pastor
801 S. Forest at Hill St.
10:00 a.m.-Worship Service.
Wednesdays, 7:00 p.m.-Choir Prac-
t ice.
Thursday, 7:30 p.m.-South Africa
Task Force Meeting, in the lounge at
Lord of Light.
* * *
WESLEY FOUNtdATiON.
at the d niversity of Michigan
60(33) 668-6881
602 E. Huron at State
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104
Rev, W. Thomas Schomaker, Chaplain
Ann Laurance, Ann Wilkinson
This Week:
Sunday, 5:30 p.M.-Shared Meal.
' Sunday, 6:15 p.m.-Worship Service.
Monday, 12:10 p.m.-'Brown bag
film: "No Job Is Bad Music: The
:Case for Full Employment." A free
film and a great way to have your
lunch.
* * *
.CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw Ave.
'Fellowship Supported by the
'Christian Reformed Church
'la ' Libolt
Service 10:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.-
Sermon title: "Looking For Commun-
ity," the worship leaders will be Clay-
ton Libolt and Glenda Prins.

FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
120 S. State St.
(Corner of State and Huron)
Worship Schedule:
8:30 a.m.-Holy Communion in th
Chapel.
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Morning Wor-
ship in the Sanctuary.
Church School for All Ages-9:30
a.m, and 11 a.m.
Choir Rehearsal Thursday-7:15
p.m.
Ministers:
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
Rev. Fred B. Maitland
Dr. Gerald R. Parker
Education Director: Rose McLean
Education Asst.: Anne Vesey
* * *1
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
Serving the Campus for LC-MS
Rovert Kavasch, Pastor
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
663-5560
Double Sunday Services-9:15 a.m.
and 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Study at 9:15 a.m.
Midweek Worship-Wednesday at
10:00 p.m.
* * *
CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium
(Across from Pioneer High)
Schedule of Services:
Sunday-Bible School 9:30 a.m.
Worship-10:30 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday-Bible Study 7:30 p.m.
Bible classes for College Students.
For information call 971-7925
Wilburn C. Hill, Evangelist
Transportation-662-9928
* * *
UNIVERSITY CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
409 S. Division
Steve Bringardner, Pastor
Church School-9:45 a.m.
Service of Worship-11:00 a.m
Time of Meeting-6:00 p.m.
* * *
ANN ARBOR FRIENDS MEETING
1420 Hill Street
10:00 a.m.-Worship Service.

ST. MARY STUDENT CHAPEL
(Catholic)
331 Thompson-663-0557
Weekly Masses:
lon.-Wed.-5:10 p.m.
Thurs. and Fri.-12:10 p.m.
Saturday-7:00 p.m.
Sunday-7:45 a.m., 9 a.m., 10:30
a.m., noon, and 5 p.m.
North Campus Mass-9:30 a.m. at
Bursley Hall, West Cafeteria.
Rite of Reconciliation - 4 p.m.- -
5 p.m. on Friday only; any other time
by appointment.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
l,432.Washtenaw Ave.-662-4466
Service of Worship:
Sunday 9:30 and 11:00 a.m.
4:00 p.m. College Student Fellowship
in the French Room. t
Prayer Breakfast Wednesday at 7:00
a.m.
Bible Study Wednesday at 4:00 p.m.
Theology Discussion Group Thurs-
day at 7:00 p.m.
* * *
AMERICAN BAPTIST CAMPUS
CENTER at FIRST BAPTIST
CHURCH
502 E. Huron St. (between State &
Division)-663-9376
Dr. Jitsuo Morikawa, Minister
10:00 a.m.-Worship Service-Ser-
mon: "Being A Caring Christian In A
Time of Political Uncertainty."
11:00 a.m.-College Class-led by
Dr. Nadean, Bishop.
Wednesdays at 7:30 p.m.-Campus
Discussion Group-Led by Margi Stu-
ber, M.D., in the Campus Center
Lounge.
* * *
CANTERBURY LOFT
Episcopal Campus Ministry
332 S. State St.
Rev. Andrew Foster, Chaplain
SUNDAY COMMUNITY EVENTS
AT ST. ANDREWS CHURCH
306 N. Division
9:00 a.m.-University Study Group.
10:00 a.m.-Worship Service with the
Parish.
12 noon-Luncheon and Student Fel-
lowship.

Gold prices catapult;'
'79 economy better
than experts forecast
NEW YORK (AP)-The price of One Zurich broker said, "Ov
gold soared by more than $100 an ounce whelming demand from everywher
yesterday in Europe to a record $845 an meeting insufficient supplies."
ounce, climbed another $5 in New York Meanwhile, in Washington,1
and then retreated to $808 in profit- government reported yesterday I
taking. It was the biggest single day the nation's economy grew as
leap in the history of bullion trading. prisingly strong 2.3 per cent last ye
The U.S. dollar was higher in New putting 1979 into the history books
York against all major foreign curren- the year in which the predic
cies except the British pound. The recession failed toarrive.
dollar was "very firm" in "very, very THE COMMERCE Department .
quiet" trading, a New York dealer said. the unexpected strength of export sa
GOLD CLOSED in Zurich at $840 an and consumer spending pushed
ounce, $109.50 higher'than Thursday's nation's gross national product,
close. The price reached $845 in justed for inflation, to an average $1
trading. In London, it closed at $835, up billion in 1979 compared with $1
$75 from a day earlier, billion in 1978.
In New York, gold .fof January , And "'tbe;, department's ch
delivery rose to a high of $85d on the economist said this strength in1
Commodity Exchange before dropping value of all the nation's goods ands
back to $822, up $20 from Thursday's vices meant the still-expected recess
close. Republic National Bank late in would not be a harsh one.
the afternoon quoted gold at $808 an The economic strength, howev
ounce, up from $792 the previous day; came at the expense of consur
gold had peaked at the bank yesterday savings, Commerce Department d
at $840. showed. The savings rate dropped t
As bullion headed for the once annual 3.3 per cent in the final thi
unimaginable $900 mark, one London months of 1979-the lowest level si
dealer said: "The speculators have 1950-
gone crazy." AN ANNUAL rate is the rate t
GOLD'S RAPID climb in Europe would occur over a full year if activ
followed leaps in Hong Kong and New continues at the same pace as it didi
York amid mounting global concern single quarter.
over the crises in Afghanistan and Iran. Still, the U.S. economic performa
The United States and the Soviet was weaker than in the boom ye
Union were reported building up their following the 1974-75 downturn.Z
naval power in the region, and there nation's average output had grown
were reports of Soviet troop concen- per cent in 1976, 5.3 per cent in 1977a
trations along the Iran-Afghanistan 4.4 per cent in 1978.
border.

ver-
e is
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as
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said
ales
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hief
the
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The
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and

Swai nson,
cleared of
pot carge
by court
LANSING (UPI)-Former Governor
and Michigan Supreme Court Justice
John Swainson has pleaded guilty to
drunk driving, and a related marijuana
possession charge was dropped after he
pleaded no contest.
The troubled, one-time political w
kid entered his guilty plea befo
Jackson District Judge Richard
Biewend Thursday and was fined $250
and issued a restricted driver license
for 90 days.
The charge carries a maximum
penalty of 90 days in jail, although4
fine is the common punishment for first
offenders such as Swainson, authorities
said.
IN A SEPARATE court, the
marijuana charge was dismissed af
Swainson pleaded nolo contendere. Tlf'
charge carries a maximum one year
sentence.
The 54-year-old Swainson was
arrested near his Manchester home
early in the morning of Nov. 16, 1977 by
state troopers who said he was driving
slowly and erratically.,
A routine search allegedly turned up
a marijuana cigarette in one of Swai-
son's suitcoat pockets and he was even-
tually charged with both drunk drivi
and marijuana possessioj.
SWAINSON HAD insisted he did not
know how the marijuana got in his
pocket.
His attorneys appealed without sue-
cess to both the state Supreme Court
and the U.S. Supreme Court for
dismissal of the charges, claiming he
was prejudiced by adverse prerial
publicity.
The legless World War II vetera
served one term as gOvernor in 1961-6
He was elected to the state Supreme
Court in 1970 but was forced to resign in
1975 after being convicted of perjury for
lying to a federal grand jury during a
bribery investigation. He was aquitted
on the bribery charges.
W
Windfall tax
compromise,
expeected .on
Capitol Hill
WASHINGTON (AP) - Senate and
House conferees reached tentative, i
formal agreement yesterday th
would require independent oil
producers to pay as much as $25 billion
in "windfall" taxes in the 1980s.
That figure is about half-way between
the $57 billion tax that the House voted
to impose on independents and the $1
billion levy favored by senators.
CONFERENCE leaders said the
preliminary agreement could lead to
final action on the tax early next wee*
Still to be determined is how the $227
billion in tax revenues would be spent.,
Bernard Shapiro, staff chief of the

Joint Committee on Taxation, told
reporters the conferees appear headed
toward agreement on a package that
would tax oil yet to be discovered at
about half or less the rate applying to
oil already in production.
Treatment of future discoveries an
of all oil produced by independents
were the two biggest items of con-
troversy between the $277 billion wind-
fall tax passed by the House last June
aid the $178 billion version voted by the
Senate in December.
THE CONFEREES agreed before the
Christmas holidays to split the dif-
ference at $227 billion but put o
deciding how them tax should be spla
among various types of crude oil and
between the major and independent
segments of the industry.
President Carter proposed the new
tax to take back part of the estimated $1
trillion that consumers will pay to the
oil industry in the 1980s as a result of his
action in removing price controls from
U.S. crude oil. After existing federal
and state taxes are deducted, the ne
tax would leave the oil industry witr
about 20 per cent of that $1 trillion
"windfall."
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
(USPS 344-900)
Volume XC, No. 89
Saturday, January 19, 1980
is edited and man aged by studenis at
the U~niversity of M hioan PzihikhM

11IVEI SITY cfMUSICA L SOCIETY presen ts
BC

SZIm t 4 Jani. 20Q

3:00&8.00-

PowerCenter

Join The Daily

Les Canadiens are a ballet company noted for performances
of lyric beauty and technical accomplishment. The Ann
Arbor programs, will combine the classical ballet of
tradition and some of the classical modlern work of
Balanchine.
Prqgium

I

"WHY DO THE HEATHEN RAGE?"

Psalms 2:1 and Acts 4:25

Queen Mary, known in history as "Bloody Mary," sat upon
the Throne of England from 1553 to 155& She was a violent
persecutor of Protestants. After having brought multitudes
-in England and Scotland and Wales to the "block" and had
their heads cut off, and othes to the "stake" to be burned
alive, she stretched forth her hand to strike them of Ireland.
In 1558 she signed a Commission authorizing the
persecution and annihilation of all Irish heretics.
Foria little sample of Queen Mary's work we quote from an
English History: "Among the first victims were John Rogers,
the Bible Transltor, and Hooper the Bishop of Glouster -
Coverdale was saved by the interposition of the king of
Denmark; but R idley and Latimer sealed their faith at Oxford,
Oct. 16, 1555. Latimer was now in his 77th year, hale and

OF EVERY KIND." These, and many other men and women,
died cruel deaths, some even rejoicing in their sufferings in
order to be faithful witnesses to Genuine Protestantism!
Protestantism lived on in England and Scotland and Wales to
bless those people and the world.
God Almighty protected and preserved the Protestants of
ireland at that time from the designs of Queen Mary and her
supporters. By a series of Providential Acts Including a
courageous act by a woman, bad weather and the death of
"Bloody Mary", this evil inspired plan was never executed.
THUS GOD PRESERVED THE PROTESTANTS OF
IRELAND!
"HE THAT SITTETH IN THE HEAVENS SHALL LAUGH:
THE LORD SHALL HAVE THEM IN DERISION!" - So, says

8:00

Divertimento No. 15-Choreography by Balanchine; Music
by Mozart
Aurole-Choreography by Paul Taylor; Music by Handel
Firebird-Choreography by Maurice Bejart; Music by Stravinsky
Tam ti delam-Choreography by Brian Macdonald; Music
Gilles Vigneault
Concerto Barocco-Choreography by Balanchine; Music by
Bach (Concerto in D minor for two violins)
Double Quartet-Choreography by Brian Macdonald; Music

I

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