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April 20, 1980 - Image 9

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-04-20

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End of school

spells trouble

The Michigan Daily-Sunday, April20, 1980-Page9
or pets

By MARGARET HELTON
Every May, when the student
population on campus shrinks
significantly, the animal population at
the Ann Arbor Humane Society of
Huron Valley increases sharply.
Students leaving town or moving to a
different dwelling in the city often are
unable to keep their pets and choose to
give them up for adoption at the
humane society, according to the
society's executive director Diane
Allevato. During most weeks of the
year, only a few animals are turned in
to the society, according to the Ann
Arbor police. The figure swells,
however, in the spring.
ACCORDING TO humane society
estimates, approximately 2,500 animals
were brought to the animal shelter last
year due to student housing problems.
All animals brought in to the humane
society are put up for adoption, but only
about 18 per cent of them find a home.
Most animals are held for about one
week, and then destroyed as new
animals are brought in. About 115
animals are terminated weekly at the
center.
According to Officer Marcia Mc-
Dowell of the Ann Arbor Police Depar-
tment's Animal Patrol, most of the dogs
that are picked up have owners.
"When we see a stray dog we pick it

up according to the city ordinance of
Ann Arbor," McDowell said. "If they
are on leashes tied to a parking meter,
we will pick them up. When the owner is
not there, they are not in control."
McDowell said that the police try to
contact the owner, but the effort is often
fruitless. According to humane society
estimates, two out of five dogs brought
in by the animal patrol are claimed by
their owners within a few days.
However, only one in fifty cats is ever
reclaimed.
THE LOCAL humane society
requires all animals that leave their
facility to be sterilized. Allevato com-
plained that sometimes -this poses
problems because; some people are on a
"macho trip" and resent having their
male dogs neutered.
"Some people love having their male
dogs getting in fights," Allevato said.
"It gives them some type of perverse
satisfaction."
If someone is forced to give up his or
her pet, Allevato recommends bringing
them to the humane society and telling
staff members as much as possible
about the animal. The chances of sur-
vival are not good for such a dog, but
they will be better if a potential new
owner has some information on the
animal's background.
"IT IS TOUGH to deal with the fact

that your animal will probably die, but
what is worse - to have your animal
killed out there by a truck, or a gun, or
some other way, or to be killed instantly
and painlessly here by an overdose?"
Allevato asked.
When the humane society destroys
animals, one person holds the animal
while someone else administers an in-
jection of sodium phenylbarbitol. The
animal is killed instantly, with no
trauma.
"By not bringing your animal in, you
are saving yourself pain, not your
animal," Allevato said.
The humane society also deals with
many other types of animals besides
cats and dogs. Often, people acquire
exotic pets and then decide they don't
want them anymore. Allevato said

most people would be surprised at how
many wild animals there are in the city.
For example, there are more raccoons
around campus than there are
squirrels. They are just not as ap-
parent.
The humane society is a private, non-
profit organization. It is funded by
donations. Special student member-
ships are available for $5.00.

Do a Tree
a 'Favor:
Recyle
Your Daily

X16 E.LIBERT AIN
Tonight: CUB KODA and the POINTS
Monday: Boom the Blues
with SONICS RENDEZVOUS
Tuesday: ELLEN McILWAINE
Don't Forget: "Meet the
'1 ' Michigan Theatre, May 2-4"

I

UA0RBER
THURSDay " MAY 10 8:00
M~ICHIGAN THEATRE
TICKETS: $8.50, $7.50, aid $3.00; on sale at both Discount Record locations,
Aura Sounde in Ann Arbor, Wherehouse Records in Ypsilanti and Ann Arbor,
Sam's Jams in Ferndale, -all Hudson's, and CTC Ticket outlets.
A PRISM PRODUCTION

Daily Photo by PETER SERIJNG
THEPOPULATION at Ann Arbor's humane society soars when the weather
gets warm-and students leave town for the summer. The shelter is located
at 3100 Cherry Hill Road.

B

SAVE 20*1
OFF THE SELLING PRICE OF ALL
JAZZ AND CLASSICAL LP'S AND TAPES IN STOCK

I

NCLUDING THESE LEGENDARY RED SEAL RECORDINGS

N1

ORMANDY conducts TCHAIKOVSKY
SYMPHONY No. 2
("LITTLE RUSSIAN")
EUGENE ORMANDY
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA
ROA RED SEAL

THE .
HOROWITZ
CONCERTS 1978/79
HIS FIRST RECORDINGS
SCHUMANN/RACHMANINOFF/LISZT
Humoresk Barcarolle ConsolationNo.3
Op.20 HumoreSque Mephisto Watz
RGl RED SEAL

ORMANDY CONDUCTs DVORAK
SYMPHONY NO.7
EUGENE ORMANDY
THE PHI - DELPHA -CHESTRA
RO RED SEAL

RAVEL
DAPHNIS ET CHLO
(Con** let let)
DALLAS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
DALLAS SYMPHONY CHORUS

Brahms
ALTO RHAPSODY
Shirley Verrett
TRAGIC OVERTURE
HAYDN VARIATIONS
Eugene Ormandy/The Philadelphia Orchestra

4rG

L

RO1l

TE DAWING OFA NEW ERA IN REORDED SOUND
CWERTMLES'hA
N DlP ORCHESMAL
nRfl RED SEAL

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STRMNSKY
L HE RDsnlE ( uENTS
SYMPHONY IN THREE MOVEMENTS
DAULAS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRAI
EDUAOMTA~

JAMES GALWAY
SONG
OF
THE SEASHORE
and
Other Melodies of Japan

RaIn

RED SEAL

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