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April 20, 1980 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-04-20

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i

r

Page 8-Sunday, April 20, 1980-The Michigan Daily
Research may
(Continued from Page 1)

suffer in '80s

we could not adequately address in the
past."
BUT NOT ALL faculty members
agree that the University can effec-
ttively stress both teaching and resear-
ch.
Economics Prof. Harvey Brazer,
chairman of the Committee on the
Economic Status of the Faculty, said
he foresees a growth in faculty teaching
loads in some departments, that will
directly interfere with faculty mem-
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hers' research work.
"Tight budgets and little hiring of
new faculty spells out increased
teaching loads," explained Brazer.
"This will affect the quality and quan-
tity of research."
Brazer noted the University's
economics department's enrollment is
increasing, despite predictions of
declining enrollments for the college of
LSA. He explained that with more
students attending classes, professors
must spend more time at their teaching
duties, which restricts their research
work.
"Increased teaching loads may
destroy the University's research fun-
ction," Brazer said. "How the Univer-
sity deals with this conflict depends on
how it perceives its responsibility to
society." -
Because the University will be facing
a tighter budget in the 1980s, fewer
faculty will be hired, causing a
"generation gap" between faculty and

students. As this gap between older
professors and younger students
widens, the exchange of ideas between
the two groups may become more
limited, according to Marvin Peterson,
director of the Center for the Study of:
Higher Education.
"MUCH OF (This issue) depends on
how wide the age gap grows, general
world events, and what student in-
terests will be in the coming years,"
Peterson said.
In addition, as the University faculty
ages, it may become less productive in
the area of research. Peterson said it is
difficult for faculty members to main-
tain productivity in both teaching and
research as they grow older, but he said
productivity varies with both the in-
dividual and the field.of study.
"There is some evidence to indicate
that natural science faculty produce the
most in their early years, while
professors in the social sciences ap-
pear to be most productive in their mid-
to-late years," Peterson said.
A KEY issue facing the University
faculty, said Brazer, is that faculty
salaries are falling behind in their pur-
chasing power, affecting both teaching
and research.
"Our income is falling behind the
consumer price index at the rate of five
to eight per cent per year," said
Brazer.
"This puts a burden on faculty mem-
bers to find other sources of income,
which ultimately detracts from the
amount of time we can put into teaching
and research."
Despite the problems surrounding
faculty salaries, Brazer said he does
not foresee a faculty union.
"I DON'T see a dichotomy between
the faculty and the administration," he
said. "I look upon President Shapiro
and (Acting) Vice-President (of
Academic Affairs) Sussman as
colleagues, not as employers. If there
were serious problems I wouldn't be in-
terested in having a third party arguing
for mue.''

Some faculty and administrators fear
more interference in University affairs
from the federal government. Accor-
ding to School of Education Dean Joan
Stark, increased external interference
may restrict the responses to problems
taken by universities everywhere.
Stark said one of the key problems
facing research is the erratic and dic-
tatorial nature of the federal gover-
nment's funding of higher education
projects. She said there are an ex-
cessive number of federal regulations
which force universities to spend just as
much money on paper work as on
research itself.
VICE-PRESIDENT for Research
Charles Overberger said the gover-
nment has increased its scrutiny of
University research over the last ten
years in two ways. First, the federal
government has called for an accoun-
ting of the context in which research is
carried out, Overberger said, adding
that the government also wants a stric-
ter financial audit of the money spent
on the projects.
"Federal accountability has to be
considered as we conduct research," he
said. "But we don't want the agency
we're dealing with to tell us exactly how
to go about our work. We want a lot of
flexibility for the faculty to carry out
their research."
OVERBERGER ALSO said some of
the accounting procedures demanded
by the government do not always fit in-
to the structure and thought of Univer-
sity procedure.
Peterson agreed with this
assessment.
"These tight procedural and contrac-
tual controls make it difficult for a
professor to integrate his teaching and.
research work," said Peterson. "The
work schedules, deadlines, and other
procedures required by the government
force professors to devote all their time
to the project, and little or no time to
teaching."

A"

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It seems inflation is hitting the country everywhere. These goose eggs,
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Mother expects m ants'
OK to visit hostage s n
(Contirued from Page1) A Tehran reporter told her he had
Timms, who live in Oak Creek, Wis., been informed by Iranian President
because they began their trip early last Abolhassan Bani-Sadr that both the
week before it was imposed. government and the militants had
Timm, slight and graying, told agreedtoletTimmseeherson.
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besides visiting her son she- hoped "to by telephone later yesterday, however,
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... And hopefully we would ease some added, "Our chances are ing pretty
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their people." see him."
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visit, as they had promised they would,
Ellen Mcilwaineand "we'll be waiting to hear from
them." Tehran Radio~ quoted her as
Tuesay, A pril22saying she expects a decision from the
militants todav.

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