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April 11, 1980 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-04-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATRE presents:
"THE CRUCIBLE"
by ARTHUR MILLER
at
Lydia Mendelssohn
April 9-12
CURTAIN 8:00 pm

Page 6-Friday, April 11, 1980-The Michigan Daily
STATE ECONOMIC OUTLOOK DISMAL
'U' prepares for fewer dollars

'pu-c

INEMA Ij-

presents (Ug
NASHVILLE OA
(ROBERT ALTMAN, 1975)
America wrapped up in a country music fest. Our most controversial
director's most publicized and most innovative film. Brilliantly scored
(Academy Award for Best Song), and wonderfully acted, it remains one of
the best films of 1975. HENRY GIBSON, LILY TOMLIN, KEITH CARRADINE,
RONEE BLAKELY, KAREN BLACK, GERALDINE CHAPLIN, and lots more.
(159 min).
ANGELL HALL 7 & 10 $1.50

r

1

i

U

Tomorrow: JONAH WHO WILL BE 25... IN THE YEAR 2000...

L

GARGOYLE FILMS Presents
THE STUDENT NURSES
Ever wonder what happens behind the scenes
at Nursing School? See one woman's sensi-
tive portrayal of four beautiful young student
nurses experiences" in the real world.
Friday, April 11
Room 100 Hutchins Hall
(LAW SCHOOL)
7:07, 9:09 Admission $1.50

(Continued from Page 1)
explain it. I guess inflation has really
eaten up people's savings."
The primary reason for the depressed
state financial outlook is the direct
slash in federal funding. Miller has
asked that Michigan be exempted from
the federal revenue sharing cuts, but
that possibility is unlikely, several state
officials say.
"The thing that made this situation
worse is the actions being taken in
Washington," Miller said.
HE SAID THE passage of the tax
limiting Headlee amendment in the fall
of 1978 was only a "minor issue."
Miller said he believes the state is
financially helping higher education as
much as it can. In therearly budget
recommendton, higher education, and
the University of Michigan in
particular, was the recipient of
unexpectedly high allocations from the
tight state budget
"HIGHER EDUCATION is a very
high priority-of mine and the
governor's," Miller said. Therefore, he
said, it will not suffer any worse than
any other areas of state expenditures.
Miller and University officials said
the possibility of a three per cent
reduction in state appropriations for
the current fiscal year (ending Sept. 30)
was still possible by an executive order
of the governor.
University administrators said they
are not worried about such occurence,
although the state losses from this year
will probably be translated in a further
reduction for fiscal year 1981.
ANOTHER POTENTIAL state
revenue cut may come in the form of
one or a number of state tax proposals
j currently being; prepared for
November's ballot. One, the Tisch
proposal, has been strongly condemned
by the University.
"It will rearrange the way the state
does its business," said Ralph Nichols,
one of the University's budget
administrators.
Nichols said the Tisch tax reduction
proposal would result in a significant
reduction of state dollars, which would
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eligible to live in the Marc House. For
information or to reserve arroom for the
Fall, call BOTH the Housing Office (763-
3164, 1011 SAB) AND the MARC office
(763-2066, 206 Tyler, East Quad) with
your name and address.
Act now on your reservation. Only a
limited number of places are available.

have a "fairly strong and negative
impact on the University."
THE PLAN, which is the tax-cutting
measure proposed by Shiawasee
Drain Commissioner Robert Tisch,
would cut and shift responsibility for
taxes to local units.
Nichols said the passage of such a
proposal "would cause significant
change" in the University's structure.
He said the size of the institution would
be reduced drastically, for instance.
Several other proposals, including
one in the planning stages suggested by
Milliken, would cut property taxes and
make up the revenues through sales or
income taxes. The other plans would
not reduce state revenues as much as
the Tisch proposal.
NO MATTER WHAT the case,
administrators, faculty, and students
all have a large stake in possible
reductions in state funds. Not only will
student tuition rise into the high double-
digit numbers, but without increases in
salary levels, faculty and staff will
suffer large setbacks in the battle with
inflation.
Acting Vice-President for Academic
Affairs Alfred.Sussman said the faculty
compensation program is the
University's highest priority. He said
that with an y increase in state
appropriations less than five per cent,
there is "no way we can mount (an
adequate salary) program... without a
lot of effect on the size of the staff."
Increasing reliance on student fees is
a way to relieve the budgetary
problems the University faces. But,
Sussman said, there is a point beyond
which tuition cannot be raised.
A fee hike figure of 17 per cent is
being discussed among certain
administrative groups. A lower
compromise figure of 15 per cent will
not hurt students as much, some faculty
members say, but that option is
dependent on a more favorable state
appropriation.
SALARY AND TUITION hikes, as
well as the amount of the state subsidy,
will not be determined until July, and
possibly later, if the state budget

Naturalists concerneds

picture keeps getting worse.
Although the University's financial
pictue may look bleak, and the cuts and
belt-tightening may be at times rather
difficult, the University survived
similar hard times just five years ago.
Tuition went up 24 per cent in 1974.
The administration also put a freeze on
equipment purchases, and-faculty and
staff salaries did not increase.
STATE AND University officials are
preparing the recipients of their money
for some hard times, but the funding
problem is still up in the air. They say
they are unsure of the impact of fewer
dollars being spent, and they admit that
much of their discussion is speculation.
Many privately admit more
optimism than is publicly expressed.
Budget Director Miller said he is not
"pessimistic" about the state's

financial condition, just "realistic."
"There are other good economists
who say it's worse than we're saying,"
Miller said, referring to the periodic
economic forecast prepared by
University researchers Joan Crary,
Saul Hymans, and President Harold
Shapiro.
Vice-President for State Relations
Richard Kennedy says there is
"enormous resilience" of the
University to adapt to these situations.
He is confident that the University will
come out of the trouble stronger and,
better off than when there were more
than enough funds to go around. =-
Tomorrow: A look at the pro-
posed federal budget cuts that will
directly affect the University.

By MAUREEN FLEMING.
- Experts from various universities
and natural resource agencies ex-
pressed their concerns over global
resources to a standing room only
crowd in the Pendleton room last night.
The panelists participated in the last
of a four-day symposium sponsored by
the School of Natural Resources.
Pierre Dansereau from the Univer-
sity of Quebec stressed that nuclear
power was the greatest invention of all
time and that it needs to be developed
for safe use.
"NUCLEAR POWER has been
primarily geared to kill," Dansereau
said. "We need to learn how to use this
without peril".
Turning towards the third world,
Bernard Wood of the North-South In-
stitute of Canada, felt that the United
States shouldn't be exporting its culture
to the third world countries. He added
that the U.S. should also stop providing
them with excessive economic aid.

"Developed countries consistently
undervalue and exploit raw materials
and trade of the underdeveloped coun-
tries," he said.
Another panelist, Lynton Caldwell of
Indiana University, said that third'
world relations will'be a critical issue in
the 1980's. He continued to say that
third world problems are not wholly of
the developed world's making.
"Our uncritical acceptance of their
problems is a counter-productive
process, he explained, "We must alert
people to the world's perilous'
predicament with the goal of mobilizing,
humanity to take care of itself."
Russell Train, president of the World
Wildlife Fund, concluded that it is
necessary to =integrate conservation0
and development plans and in addition
develop enforcement and regulatory
mechanisms to deal with problems'with,
political systems that dependon,
national-sovereignty.

IMPRESSIONS FROM JANUARY VISIT:
Pro speaks on Iran

(Continued from Page fi
address in the Dana Building, "to get a
first-hand impression of the revolution
in Iran." The Detroit native didn't deny
that his opinions about the events there
were well-developed before he left. "I
had an understanding that the
revolution in Iran was a positive
event," he said,-"that it was proper to
throw out the shah, and that it was
proper to conduct the revolution as a
whole."
Zweig's public support of the
revolution gained him an invitation

CINEMA GUILD
PRESENTS TONIGHT
TERRENCE MALICK'S
BADLANDS
Starring MARTIN SHEEN and SISSY SPACEK both of whom are hot property
these days. He kills ten people in various midwest spots, and she watches.
"He was the craziest guy I know." With WARREN OATE Sas her father.
Saturday: DAYS OF HEAVEN
Shows at 7:00 & 9:05 at Old A & D Aud.

from the Confederation of Iranian
Students, who brought Zweig and his
two companions, Prof. James Cock-"
croft of Rutgers University and his wife
Eva, into the country as represen-
tatives of the New York Committee to
Send the Shah Back to Iran.
HE SPENT his eight days touring
Tehran, talking to Iranian residents
around the embassy and in the suburbs,
and exploring the local media, com-
merce, and overall climate. During an
interview yesterday, Zweig described
several reflections on his visit to
Tehran: "I noticed a very relaxed
overall atmosphere," he said. - The
American media had portrayed the rule
of Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini as
very strict, he explained; Americans
were told that he had banned Western
music and forced women to wear
chodors in reverence of Islam, among
other repressive measures.
' According to Zweig, Khomeini's
measures were suggestions instead of
orders. Western music can be obtained
in numerous Tehran stores, and many
women wear chadors only for religious
and traditional observances, he said.
In addition, Zweig said he noticed no
suppression of ideas on the streets of
Tehran: "Everywhere, people were
expressing different'views, handing out
panphlets and discussing the issues.
"THE WAY the Islamic revolution

was presented to this country, 'either
you pray to Allah five hours a day or
you're in trouble.' But it is not like that.
It isn't the monolithic man-made state
that it is cut out to be."
Zweig said he also noticed a sur-
prising lack of hostility by Iranians
toward American citizens, as oppose
to the harsh attitude of the Iranian
government. "I didn't know whether
they would spit on me or what," he
recalled. "When it was clear that I
wasn't representing the American
government, there was a lot of genuine
friendliness, even if I expressed
disagreement over a particular Iranian
policy."
The professor said that he was "very
struck by the Iranians' effort t
establish a democratic government in-
dependent from the United States and
the Soviet Union. The orderly, step-by-
step implementation process seemed
very significant for a Third World coun-
try."
Zweig said he was impressed with
how quickly the elections were held af-
ter the overthrow of the shah, in which
President Abolhassan Bani-Sadr was
elected.
He said there is , widespread
disagreement over which country
presents the most serious threat, if any
to the well-being of Iran.

Gonzomania Strikes AnnArbor'
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN'S OFFICE OF
MAJOR EVENTS IS PLEASED TO PRESENT .. .
WANGO-TANGO TOUR'80

I

With Special Guests
ROAD MASTER

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FRIDAY,
APRIL18
8:00
CRISLER

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RENA.
Ann
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