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April 10, 1980 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1980-04-10

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Page 2-Thursday, April 10, 1980-The Michigan Daily
IMMUNE FIND COULD IMPROVE ODDS FOR SUCCESS
Discovery may benefit transplants

BOSTON (AP)-The discovery of an
obscure element of the body's immune
system could dramatically improve
doctors' ability to match donor and
recipients of kidney transplants,
researchers say.
Kidney transplants work best when
the givers and receivers react similarly
to invasions by foreign substances-in
this case, the transplanted kidneys. But
doctors have had trouble figuring out
how to measure if people's natural
immune systems are compatible.

NOW MthIWAUKEE researchers
think they have found a key to
circumventing this complex maze of
defenses which often triggers the body
to attack the transplanted organ and
kill it.
.The trigger devices are called
antigens. An antigen signals other cells
to attack and destroy an invader.
Researchers at the Blood Center of
Southeastern Wisconsin identified a
group of antigens called the MB

system, produced by white blood cells.
In a new study, they found that kidney
recipients did far better if their MB
antigens were the same as those of the
person who gave up the organs.
THE WORK, DIRECTED by Rene
Duquesnoy, a pathologist, was
published in Thursday's issue of the
New England Journal of Medicine.
"We are excited," he said in an
interview. "When we first observed
these results, we didn't believe them,
because this was just too good to be
true."
So far, they have tested the theory
only on people who received kidneys
from close relatives, but studies are
under way to find out if the new tests
will bring about better matches for
people who get kidneys from cadavers.
The researchers reviewed 21
transplants conducted sicne 1968. They
found that 12 of the 13 people who were
able to keep their new organs more
than a year had the same MB antigens
as the donors. All eight of those whose
bodies rejected the organs had different
MB antigens.
With current methpds, which do not

'We are excited.

When

we first observed these

results, we didn 't

be-

take MB compatibility into account,
people who receive kidneys from close
relatives have a 60 to 75 per cent chance
of keeping them more than a year.
People can have one of three MB

.' ,
4,,,

BE BRIGHT .
Turn out
the light!
(and save electricity)

lieve them because this
was just too good to be
true.'
-Research director
Rene Duquesnoy
antigens, and Duquesnoy said that by
matching them, "it will help to improve
graft survival. If it will be 100 per cent,
it's till a little too early to say."

Soviet rocket tolink
with space station,

The Department of Philosophy
announces
The annfer Lecture Program
19 79-80
SYMPOSUM
CHILDREN, MORAL
DEVELOPMENT,
AND MORAL VALUES
THURSDAY, APRIL 10
RACKHAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES
THE AMPHITHEATRE
915 E. WASHINGTON, FOURTH FLOOR,
9:15 a.m. PRESENTATIONS
OF COMMENTS:
MARTIN L. HOFFMAN
Visiting Professor and Executive Officer, Department of
Psychology, The Graduate School of the City University of
New York
CAROL GILLIGAN
Professor of Education, Laboratory of Human Develop-
ment, Harvard Graduate School of Education
GARETH MATTHEWS
Professor of Philosophy, University of Massachusetts,
Amherst
11:00 a.m. PANEL DISCUSSION
With ROBERT COLES
RICHARD B. BRANDT
(Professor of Philosophy, the University of Michigan),
moderator.
The program should conclude by 12:15 p.m.
The Symposium is open to the public without charge
Ulich's Annual
InventorySale
Involving every item in our store
except textbooks.
Special prices on calculators.
Sale Ends Saturday, April 12th.
20P% OFF
All Office Supplies
INCLUDING
File Folders
Attache Cases
Brief Bags
Lamps
Staplers
Paper
Pens
Roladex
Pencil Sharpeners
And Many More for Home and Office
Smith Corona Typewriters
12" M anual16.... .... ........................................... 169.50
12" Electric Portable Pica (Enterprise). . . . ......... . ......................169.95
12" Electric Portable Cartridge w/return (2200). . ....... ...........305.50
1" Ielrntri. Drtnhkl (nrrir4,nt = ./) rt urn (19M ..V. 100 5

MOSCOW (AP)-The Soviet Union
launched two cosmonauts into orbit
yesterday.
The official Tass news agency said a
record-holding adventurer and a rookie
cosmonaut were launched to make
repairs on Salyut 6, the station that has
been in orbit 2% years. The launch of
the Soyuz 35 craft followed a record-
breaking 175-day manned mission
aboard the space station last year.
The last American manned space
flight, by contrast, was in July, 1975,
when Thomas Stafford and Donald
Slayton docked their Apollo 18 craft to.
the Soviet Soyuz 19 in a dramatic space
linkup.
ALL SYSTEMS aboard Soyuz 35 were
functioning normally, Tass said, and
the two cosmonauts were feeling good.
Soviet television carried pictures of
the launch three hours after liftoff from
the Baikonur space center in Central
Asia. At liftoff, one of the cosmonauts
could be heard jubilantly yelling "Let's
go!"
Since Salyut 6 was launched Sept. 29,
1977, it has been visited by seven
crews-three of them made up of
international teams.
THE SOVIETS launched an
unmannedcraft last month to test new
guidance systems, and then sent up
another unmanned transport ship in
late March to deliver supplies to Salyut
6. That spacecraft is still docked to

Salyut, awaiting the two cosmonauts to
unload it.
Tass said the mission of the
cosmonauts would be first to clean,
repair and restore the space station,
and then to "carry on scientific and
technical experiments, the study of the
Earth's natural resources and medical-
biological research in near space."
The current flight is the latest in a
long series that testifies to the Soviet
Union's determination to create almost
permanently manned space stations.
Previous teams of cosmonauts have
lived aboard the Salyut for 96, 140 and
175 days, and four other teams-each
including non-Soviets-have made brief
visits.
FOR FLIGHT engineer Valery
Ryumin, 40, this will be his third visit to
the Salyut station. He last returned
Aug. 19 after setting the record of 175
days and 36 minutes in orbit with
Vladimir Lyakhov.
The commander of Soyuz 35 is Lt. Col.
Leonid Popov, 34, an air force pilot who
has been involved inthe Soviet space
program since 1970 but had never
traveled in space before.
During the six-month mission last
year, progress ships delivered fresh
food, water and other supplies
approximately every 45 days. Ryumin
and Lyakhov even found time to grow
onions and greens to supplement their
diet.

Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
Carter Campaign worried if
Anderson goes independent
WASHINGTON-The Carter campaign, worried that John Anderson
might win over Democratic votes in the general election, said yesterday it is
checking into state election laws governing independent presidential races.
Campaign legal counsel Tim Smith said he is assembling data on how an
independent gets on the ballot, hinting that Carter might try to stop the
Anderson campaign where he can.
Anderson has not yet decided if he will run as an independent, but is being
pressured by moderates of both parties. Most observers feel his campaign
would hurt Carter more than Ronald Reagan, who seems virtually assured
of the GOP nomination.
Detroit burglar ring cracked
DETROIT-The well-to-do residents of fashionable Detroit suburbs
can breathe a little easier now that Detroit police have arrested three men
they believe responsible for $1.25 million worth of gold and silver items. At
least two more arrests were expected, police said.
Investigators said the five-man gang, operating out of Detroit,
specialized in stealing coins, dishes, flatware and jewelry from homes in
Oakland, Macomb and Wayne counties.
"The list is very extensive and they had some very good rips to their
credit," said Detective Thomas Podeszwik of the Grosse Pointe Woods
police department.
"Much of the stuff they took could be easily sold to gold and silver
dealers," Podeszwik said. "When you walk into a dealer, he's hardly going
to ask you if that's really your silverware that you want to sell."
Social Security benefits up
WASHINGTON-Inflation is rarely good news, but for the nation's
35 million Social Security beneficiaries, it means benefit increases of more
than 14.3 per cent in July.
The exact figure won't be known until April 22 when the government
announces the Consumer Price Index (CPI) for March. Social Security
payments are adjusted annually when inflation exceed three per cent. The
increase is based on how much the CPI rises from the first quarter of one
year to the first quarter of the next.
Three months ago, the Carter adminsitration forecast the Social
Security rise would be 13 per cent. But the CPI indicates it will probably rise
above that. A 14.3 per cent increase will cost the government nearly $17
billion and raise the average monthly benefit for individuals to $360. This will
be the biggest cost-of-living increase for Social Security beneficiaries since
the system was tied to the CPI in 1975.
NY strike turns violent
NEW YORK-New York vandals yesterday sabotaged more than 20
private buses while rain helped stall commuters in the worst traffic jams
since the transit strikebegan. At least two policemen were also assaulted.
The strikers vowed that the $1 million in fines assessed against their
unions would not force them back to work. They took to the streets harassing
motorists and trying to spot private buses.
The fines were imposed Tuesday, and the strikers were ordered back
to work. They were called back into court yesterday and threatened with
new punishments for refusing the back-to-work order. Meanwhile, an
attorney for the strikers says the negotiators are on the brink of "substantial
progress."
Carter cuts may halt
state highway projects
LANSING-State transportation Director John Woodford said Carter
administration cutbacks will force a $150 million reduction in new federally
funded highway projects in the May-September period.
Woodford also warned that the $1 billion cut in federal support for work
in progress could force a halt to highway construction in Michigan June 1
unless Congress approves a supplemental appropriation.
The cutbacks come at the height of the construction season, an
additional blow to the already ailing building industry. Nearly 200 projects
including skidproofings and lane-widenings will be deferred.
Kopechne's mother may
support Kennedy campaign
SWIFTWATER, Pa.-The mother of Mary Jo Kopechne does not hold
Sen. Edward Kennedy responsible for her daughter's death in the accident
at Chappaquiddick, and says she may vote for him for president.
Gwendlyn Kopechne asserts there was no romance between her
daughter and Kennedy, and says she believes no wrongdoing occurred in the
accident in which her daughter drowned.

6

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Daily Official Bulletin

THURSDAY, APRIL 101980
Daily Calendar:
WUOM: National Town Meeting, Jacques-Yves
Cousteau and Jules Bergman, "The Seas: Scientific
& Political Prospects," 10:30 a.m.
Nuclear Engineering: Gary S. Was, "Synergistic
Effects of Thermal Treatment and Cathodic
Polarization on Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior in
Iconel-600," Bear, Cooley, 11 a.m.
Center for Japanese Studeies: Rober Danly,
"Meiji Ambition: The Satirical Side of Higuchi
Ichiyo," Lane Commons, noon.
Chemistry: Romita Sen, "The Internal Structure
of Neurohormonal Storage Vesicles: A NMR Spec-
troscopic Vies," 1200 Chem., 4p.m.
MHRI: David J. Kupfer, "EEG Sleep and Affec-
tive Disorders," 1057 MHRI, 3:45 p.,.
Physics/Astronomy: D. Newman, "Progress in
the Position g-2 and Nuclear Weak Interaction Ex-
periments," 2038 Randall, 4 p.m.,
Computing Center: Paul Pickelman, "The
Programming Language, Pascal," Seminar Rm., 7
p.m.
Natural Resources: Panel discussion, "Global
Resources-The Critical Issues," Pendleton, Union,
7 p.m.
Guild House: Poetry Readings, Thomas Fitzsim-
mons, and Gozo Yoshimasu, 802 Monroe, 7:30 p.m.
SUMMER JOBS
CAREER PLANNING & PLACEMENT
3200 SAB
ON-CAMPUS INTERVIEWS:
CAMP FIRE GIRLS OF DETROIT. All types of

camp positions. Sign up now for interviews on April
8. Work-study funds available.
CAMP TAMARACK, Ortonville & Brighton, MI.
All types of camp positions. Sign up now for inter-
views on April 9.
CAMP NATCHEZ, West Copake, NY. All types of
camp positions. Sign up now for interviews on April
10.
OHIO EASTER SEALS CAMP. Still has openings
for males in camp for handicapped children. sign up
now for interviews on April 10.
CAMP TANUGA, Kalkaska, MI. All types of camp
positions. Sign up now for interviews on April 11.
CAMP SEQUOIA, Adrian, MI. Needs counselors
with the following skills: arts & crafts, WSI, western
riding, archery & riflery, nature lore. Also needs a
cook. Sign up beginning April 8 for interviews on
April 16.
CAMP TAMARACK, Ortonville and Brighton, MI.
All types of camp positions. Sign up beginning April 8
for interviews on April 17.
MICHIGAN DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC
HEALTH. Needs student assistants for inspection of
agricultural labor camps. Completion of sophomore
year and biology or environmental health cour-
sework required. Sign up now for interviews on April
17.
SIGN UP PROCEDURES: On Tuesdays, you may
come to Room 3529 SAB and sign up in person to in-
terview with organizations scheduled to visit during
the following week. Beginning on Wednesdays and
continuing throughout the week you may sign up in
person or by phone. Call 764-7456.
For more details about these organizations and
others offering summer employment, check the in-
formation in the Summer Jobs section of Career
Planning and Placement, 3200 SAB.

4

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U
C

(USPS 344-900)
Volume XC, No. 151
Thursday, April 10, 1980

0

The Writers-in-Residence Progrem
at the Residential College -
presents a reading by
Author of 10 novels including THE BUTTE POLKA (forthcoming
summer 1980), Mysteries & Westerns, and Lost Poems (poetry)
8 pm- TuesdyApril 15-8 pm
/enzi mer b amiy-ast Qued
f Inuniesiu hbeweern 5-ill andilla~rdl

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