100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 04, 1980 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-04-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

6

Speaker
BY FRED FIEBER
Frances Moore Lappe, author of Diet
for a Small Planet and other books, told
a Michigan Union crowd Wednesday
night that the technology exists to feed
everybody in the world, including
natives of third world countries. Her
talk was part of a two-day teach-in in
connection with World Hunger Week.
The teach-in, which began Tuesday
night with a benefit concert by Harry
Chapin, focused on many aspects of the
world hunger problem, including that in
the U.S., and the problems with
donating food to foreign countries.
Author and world hunger strategist
Lappe was the best received by the 400
people who heard her Wednesday night.
She stressed that farming technology
has created part of the hunger problem,

in uprooting small farmers and
laborers who have then had to relocate
in cities and ghettos.
LAPPE SPOKE about the increasing
monopoly power in the U.S.: "We've
lost 1900 farms per week over the past
25 years," she said, "and right now, one
fourth of one per cent of the U.S. food
firms control virtually all of our
market. Thus, there can be more food
and still more hunger, due to inflation."
Lappe said she feels the biggest ob-
stacle in combatting hunger is
Americans' feelings of powerlessness
concerning the huge agribusinesses.
"We feel that while monopoly power
is increasing, at least the land is being
used efficiently. But our studies show
that the smaller producer can actually
produce more per acre," she said.

Author, pediatrician and public
health physician Roy Brown appeared
with Lappe, and spoke on "The
Tragedy of Starring Children." He
agreed with Lappe that hunger is
prevalent in the U.S., adding that it is
an everyday situation which is often
distorted by the media.
"We only see and read about hunger
during wartime, droughts and floods.
But mroe people go to bed hungry every
night than we're aware of," he said.
BROWN STRESSED that hunger
education is needed most. "The U.S.
sent powdered skim milk to Africa in
years past, partially to help establish
price supports for (American) farmers.
But some of the children who received
this milk actually went blind because
the missing A and D vitamins, impor-

Study: State teachers dissatisfied

examine world hunger

tant to sight, were lost with the milkfat.
Donated food is definitely not the an-
swer."
Michael Jacobson, director of the
Center for Science in the Public In-
terest in Washington, D.C., presented a
humorous talk titled "Junk Food as
World Hunger." His speech targeted
the average Ameican diet, and
criticized the nation's supermarkets,
which he called "emporiums of weird
food."
Jacobson displayed two pr'oducts,
Garbage Candy and Sloppy Waffles,
which he claimed "deserve an
Academy Award, as they represent the
pinnacle of junk."
"GARBAGE CANDY," he continued,
"is most aptly named. It comes in a
non-biodegradable toy garbage can
filled with miniature sugar-and-corn
syrup dog-bones,'old shoes,'and the like.
Sloppy Waffles is a full ounce of waffle-
shaped bubble gum, complete with a
package of artificial syrup containing
artificial flavors, coloring and preser-
vatives.
Jacobson added that nutritious food
can be found in supermarkets, "as long
as you stick to the outside edge where
vegetables, fruits and poultry are
located. On the inner aisles, anything
goes.,,
ALl three speakers suggested food co-
operatives are good consumer alter-
natives to both monopoly power and
unhealthy food. "By supporting them,
we can only help ourselves," said Lap-
pe.

By DOUG FELTNER
Southeastern Michigan school
teachers feel considerably less satisfied
with their jobs and their general
"quality of worklife" than the average
American worker, according to a
recent study conducted jointly by the
Institute for Social Research (ISR),
and the University's School of
Education.
The study, co-directed by Assistant
Professor of Education Hyman Kor-
nbluh and ISR research scientist
Robert Cooke, surveyed 200
southeastern Michigan school teachers
from 25 schools. The results were com-
pared to the results from a Quality of
Employment survey administered in
1977 by ISR to approximately 2,000
workers across the country.
The teacher study cited inconvenient
or excessive work hours, health and
safety hazards, poor job mobility and
security, and a shortage of available
resources as some of the sources of
teacher frustrations.
"It isn't that teachers are big com-
plainers," Kornbluh stated. "They
showed a relatively higher overall life-
satisfaction than the subjects in the
national study."
Kornbluh explained that the teachers
surveyed felt a real sense of job in-

security, which was due, he said, to
changing demographics of the country,
resulting in declining enrollments.
"The schools have laid off teachers,"
said Kornbluh, adding that there has
not been a reduction in class size.
"Also, it is much more difficult for
new teachers to get in," he said. "I
think that's a very negative effect."
Kornbluh said more females than
males took part in the Michigan survey,
and the Michigan teachers were better
educated than the workers surveyed
nationally. But he said these
demographics differences do not ex-
plain why the teachers reported a lower
quality of worklife.
"We compared the Michigan
teachers surveyed to college-educated
people in the national survey," said
Kornbluh, "and that didn't chanIe the
results."
In addition, the study stated that
"Women in both surveys are more
positive about their jobs than their
male counterparts."
The study, funded in part by the U.S.
Department of Labor, was conducted'{
by a team of organizational psychology'
students, University faculty, and
education graduate students who were
also employed full-time as teachers and
administrators in Michigan schools.
"It was a unique combination of

social scientists and practitioners,"
Kornbluh said. "It was an important
and unique learning experience."
Kornbluh found some of the survey
results surprising, including both the
juxtaposition of the relatively higher
life-satisfaction and the relativel$y
lower job satisfaction and the lack of
any significant difference in teacher at-
titudes between males and females.
"The difference between male and
female teachers are practically non-
existent," Kornbluh said. "If anybody
has retained the stereotype of the
prissy school mom, the basis for that;
has been wiped out."

4th Ward council
vote unpredictable,

tm CINEMA 11

NOb
10v

PRESENTS

r0
'IIjc
hr

HAIL THE CONQUERING HERO
(PRESTON STURGES, 1944)
HAIL THE CONQUERING HERO is Sturges' barrage at patriotism and small-
town America. Woodrow Lafayette Pershing Truesmith who comes from
a family of war heroes, is about to return home in disgrace after being
discharged from the service for chronic hayfever. In San Francisco he falls
in with six Marines, led by ex-fighter Freddie Steele as a pug with a severe
mother complex, who persuades him to pose as a hero in order to please.
his mother. "HAIL" is pitched at the point of hysteria where the ticker-
tape parade and the lynch-mob meet. 7 & 10
CHRISTMAS IN JULY
(PRESTON STURGES, 1940)
CHIRSTMAS IN JULY is the most unjustly neglected of Sturges' master-
pieces, being his purest exposition of overnight success. Sturges under-
stood the drudgery of the office grind and the capariciousness of the rise
to success. Dick Powell is the clerk who wins the prize for his brilliant
promotional jingle: "If you can't sleep at night, it's not the coffee-it's
the bunk." Also starring Ellen Drew and William Demarest. 8:45 Only.

(Continued from Page 1)
no really big issues to help decide this
year."
Surprisingly though, both candidates
have run issue-oriented campaigns,
particularly stressing the issue of high
taxes.
"I think the cost of housing is the
main issue. And property taxes are a
major portion of the high rates," said
Fisher. To counteract this, he has asked
the city's administration to submit an
alternate budget with a 15 per cent
millage reduction' (about 5-7 per cent
tax cut) for council to study.
"WE HAVE TO take the sting out of
these huge increases," he said.
But Perkins claims Fisher's tax issue
is merely a political maneuver. "It's
becoming clear to a lot of people that
it's phony," she said.
Perkins claims "Millage reduction is
at best a temporary solution. For us, it
is important for (the city) to get off
property tax, we're losing the state and
federal revenue sharing, my thrust -
be involved with state legislatures on
what will go on the ballot in the fall."
ALTHOUGH Perkins said she does
not have a specific answer for reducing
property taxes, she said she thinks
there should be a careful study of city
tax assessment methods.
Perkins said she doesn't see a lot of
fat in the city budget. But she said she
wants to better organize the police and
fire department so that administrators
can be reassigned to duties which put
them in more direct contact with the
public. She lists solid waste and road
repair among her highest concerns.
The candidates hold opposing views
on the issue of a city-wide energy plan.
Fisher supports a city investigation of
harnessing the Huron River to produce
hydro-electric power, but disagrees
with a proposal to mandate housing in-
sulation after a voluntary five-year
program.
PERKINS ON the other hand, sup-
ports the energy plan proposed by the
city administration and said she

believes in "a, really strong energy
program."
The two also differ'on the issue of rent
control - Perkins for and Fisher
against.
But Perkins has no specific rent con-
trol proposal.
And Fisher blasts Perkins for not
being more specific on the issue.

0
6
0

Fishrr
...door to door campaigning

ANGELL HALL

$1.50 one show, $2.50 both shows

Tomorrow: MIDNIGHT EXPRESS
Gonzomania Strikes AnnArbor!
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN'S OFFICE OF
MAJOR EVENTS IS PLEASED TO PRESENT ...
WANGO-TANGO TOUR'80

Perkins
... phoning prospective voters

sue4...
FRIDAY,
APRIL18
8:00
CRISLER

A&M Recording Artists;
SQUEErZE

!J

t;
I
A .'-
~ , e
1 " '" .
.--'

:
' - -

J--

0
0

A
4N

RENA
trbor

_,
.
frh

lINM A PRIl .I

i

M

i

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan