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April 04, 1980 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-04-04

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The Michigan Daily-Fridgy, April 4; 1980--Page 5

Blues alive and

kicking in A2

EASTER EVE

I

In the wake of the Blues Brothers
commercial success last year, there's
been a revival of interest in the blues.
Everyone from Z Z Top to the Blue
Front Persuaders is reaffirming blues
roots with a passign - and introducing
a new generation of listeners to a

venerable, unique musical tradition in
the process. Unfortunately, the vast
majority of recent white blues efforts
have been pale-faced imitations at
best; distilled approximations of a style
that continues to develop and expand in
spite of "popular taste" and mass ap-

peal.
That's where Son Seals comes in.
Born in Oscela, Arkansas and brought
up in the back room of his father's juke,
joint, Seals was surrounded by great
blues practically from birth. With
musicians like Sonny Boy Williamson
and Albert King playing in the front
room, Seals' musical direction seems
almost pre-determined. Under his
father's demanding tutelage, Son
mastered the guitar while still in his
teens and established chops touring
with Albert King and the legendary
guitarist Earl Hooker.
But it's under his own name that Son
Seals has established a growing
reputation as one of the most exciting
and innovative blues players of the last
ten years. Setting up residence in
Chicago,rthe capital of urban blues, he
shook off early, unfavorable com-
parisons to Albert King as his first
album The Son Seals Blues Band
proclaimed him a talented composer as
well as performer. Subsequent years of
steady gigs built up a glowing word of
mouth reputation, culminating in the
critical success of album number two,
Midnight Son.
But live performances are what the
blues (and Son Seals) are all about.
Son's combination of volatile but
precise guitar work and gruffly ex-
pressive vocals in front of a powerhouse.
band is the epitome of spontaneous
energy and raw emotion. Ann Arbor
will get a chance to hear just what the

EASTER VIGIL
AND EUCHARIST

4

blues are rvullY all about on Monday,
April 21 when the Son Seals Blues Band
make their first local appearance in a
number of years.
This show affords a great opportunity
for veteran enthusiasts and newcomers
alike to experience authentic blues in a
fairly conducive small-club at-
mosphere; Rick's Cafe on Church
Street. Hopefully, the hoards of kids
that trek here to hear mediocre cover
versions of the blues most every
weekend will jump at that chance to
hear the real thing. Tickets are a
bargain atrthree dollars per, and are
available at the club, Schoolkids, and
both Discount Records. And if this isn't
enough good news, Texas bluesman ex-
traordinaire Albert Collins will be at
the same place on May 28. The blues
isn't coming back: it's been with us all
along.
Depending on thel diet of a chicken,
the color of egg yolks may range from
pale yellow to oraange; the color has no
effect on quality.

Come join other students and church memb
service of remembrance and celebration!
11:30 pm-12:15 am
APRIL 5

ers in this
st PresbyterimeChurch
1432 Washtenew
(between Hill and s. Univefsity)

ickets for Pre sident Shapiro 's
Ina1uguation and concert
Monday, April 14, 1980
A limited number of general admission tickets to President
Shapiro's Inaugural Ceremony and Inaugural Concert are
available for students, faculty and staff who would like to
attend. The Inauguration will be held at 10:30 a.m. and the
concert at 2:00 p.m. Both events will be held in Hill Audi-
torium on Monday, April 14.
Tickets will be available on a first-come, first-served basis
upon presentation of an individual's identification card. Tic-
kets will be limited to two per person and will be distt'ibuted
from the Office of the Registrar, Room 1518, LSA Building,
from 8:Q0 a.m. until 12:00 noon and from 1:00 p.m. until
5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday beginning Monday, March
31.

Son Seals

One of the foremost practitioners of the blues extant, Son Seals, is slated to
make a long-overdue appearance in Ann Arbor on Monday, April 21 at
Rick's. This show could well be one of the most exciting of the year-don't
miss it. ,

'FOOD

FOR:

T4 10U4T

_ _ _, .

I
I
i
R
1
'
1
P
s
F i
Y
3
iZ
i
E

featuring The WHIIFLETREE

cream drinks are literally fit for
a king.
The Whiffletree is open
Monday through Saturday from-
11:30 a.m. until 2 a.m. On'
Sundays, the doors are unlocked
at 4 p.m. and closing time is 1

Everything about The
Whiffletree makes it the place
to go at your next opportunity to
dine out. Plan on visiting this
restautant, one of Ann Arbor's
best, in the very near future.
The rustic spirit will capture you
forever.

"Whiffletree"-not a frequently
used word in everyday speech.
For a whiff letree is the swinging
bar to which the tugs of a
harness are fastened to pull a
carriage, plow, or wagaon. A
symbol of a simpler, rustic era.
The essence of this period can
be recaptured by any Ann
Arborite. All a person needs to
do is visit one of this city's most
enjoyable restaurants, The
Whiffletree, located at 208 West
Huron Street. Excellent food,
service, and cocktails are

combined to make anyone's
dining experience a plesure.
Each detail of the carefully
planned decor of The
Whiffletree does much to make
the customer feel he has been
transported back through time
to the age of the pioneers who
settled the midwest. Raw wood
barnsiding is utilized throughout
the outside and inside of the
building. "Whiffletree," of
course, are incorporated into
the design. Fixtures eminating
warm light hang from them, and

they embellish the walls, along
with numerous other antiques.
Brown, amber, and gold
stained-glass panels add the
finishing touch to these
handsome arrangements.
There is no lack of delicious
fine food at The Whiffletree. A
wide variety of choices exists at
both lunch and dinner. In fact, a
different list of additional dishes
is attached to the regular menu
with the change of every meal,
allowing the patron the largest
possible number of choices.

Seafood is the special
specialty at The Whiffletree. Six
or seven "catches of the day"
are always featured, along with
their exquisitely prepared
standard seafood fare. Roasted
rack of baby lamb and
barbequed Canadian baby back
ribs are also quite tempting, as
are the duck and veal dishes.
Luncheon customers are treated
to lucious quiches, fettuccine,
and linguine. Best of all,
portions are generous while
prices are extremely
reasonable.
Three different soups are
available every day, among
them an irresistable French
onion. From the garden a
person may order one of several
delectable salad combinations,
ranging from the Whiffletree
Salad, "a complete vegetable
garden in your bowl," to the
Maurice Salad, "a julienne of
turkey, ham, and swiss cheese
on a bed of mixed greens."
During the summer, a tasy fresh
fruit salad will be readied for an
individual upon his request.
Other appetizers reflect
Whiffletree's oceanic
orientation-Oysters Rocke-
feller, mussels, clams, and
escargot.
Unusual drinks are something
not to be missed when dining at
The Whiffletree. A number of
varied coffee refreshments are
very alluring, and several ice

<. i

01b he in;rb ?Jns

Lunch M-F 11:30-2
Dinner 4-10
Sunday 3-8:30

662-1647
668-9290
Reservations Recommended

- - : it' --
Mon-Sat 11:30-2 am
Sun 4-1 am
208 W. HURON
995-0505

FOR LUNCH & DINNER
" STEAKS
* COCKTAILS
" SALAD BAR
* WINE & BEER
" SEAFOOD
ANN ARBOR NEWS-"For the fish lover
however, we have found the Whiff letree
the best place in the area."

1
7+

PRETZEL BELL

" Buffet luncheon featuring roast
beef and homemade soups.
" Complete dinners including
the lavish salad bar.
FERTURING DIILY SPECIALS

Continental cuisine and Michigan's most extensive
wtne list within a warmfriendly ambience
2 miles east of US23 on Plymouth Road in Dixboro

120 E. Liberty
761-1470

MON-SAT: Cafeteria 11:00-4
Dinner 5-10

SUN: Dinner 12-9

J

I -IIf

I

M"

r

il

G
/
' )
iY'

Leopold Bloom's
Early Dining Specials
5-6:30
PRIME RIBS OF BEEF $7.25
Served with baked potato and salad
CHICKEN CORDON BLEU $6.25
on wild rice blend with salad
Make your graduation reservations now

333

OF

COME AS YOU ARE TO
Tkaxo Coca.gJ
(I.amplIgfer's Big Brotber)
THE SAME FAMOUS SICILIAN PIZZA AND
THE SAME GREAT LOW PRICES
Tuesday: Beer Night
Wednesday: Spaghetti Night
Thursday: Pizza Night

-1
-2

114 E. Washington
665-3231

Every Sunday
SPECIA L ITALIAN BUFFET
Every Thursday
SMORGASBORD
FOR ONLY $495
Includes: Soup, Salad,
Relish Bar and Bread

LEOPOLD BLOOM'S
118 W. Liberty

665-33

514 E. Washington
996-0555

F

TUE-THU 11-
FRI & SAT 11-
SUN 11:30

I

P.

1l

m

i

II r

II

'i

r'T ,I CFRVAT(1RY

III

WUII

* Fresh ground sirloin daily

i

III II \MlEIIrd/ + *Your choiceo f a variety of 11II

111

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