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April 04, 1980 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-04-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

OPPOSE MAJOR PAR T Y DOMINA TION
Small parties seek MSA seats

The Michigan Daily-Friday, April 4, 1980-Page 3

By LISSA OLIVER
and MITCH StUART
Fourth in a five-part series
Members of large parties aren't the only people
who will be vying for seats on the Michigan Student
Assembly in the April 8 and 9 elections.
Several smaller parties have also sprung into
existence, and although members hope to enjoy
many of the advantages of running on a slate rather
than as independents, some- also say they are
opposed to the current large-party domination of
MSA.
TOM GOOD, CANDIDATE for an LSA
representative seat and president of the Alliance for
Responsible Management (ARM), feels that "MSA
has ost touch with the average student."
He says the way to get students interested and
involved with MSA is to reassess the assembly's
priorities and narrow its scope. Good cited lobbying
missions to Washington as being '"outside the bounds
of MSA (and) an irresponsible use of resources."

Another new small party this year is GATOR:
Great Alternative to Outmoded Representation.
Presidential candidate and party spokesman Bob
Jobe said, "The biggest reason that we formed as a
party is it's the only way we could compete with the
big parties." GATOR has three members.
GATOR STUDENT POLICY advisor and
campaign manager Rod Falls said his party is
dissatisfied with current MSA efforts to sponsor
student projects. He said GATOR proposes to work
on course evaluations, black enrollment, and
especially student involvement.
"We would like to break up the party system," said
GATOR vice-presidential candidate George Majoros.
He said he sees the responsibilities of the vice-
president as delegating responsibility and
coordinating information between committees.
Mike Ryngaert, presidential candidate for the new
Realistic party says he sees MSA now as "a joke."
The Realistic party proposes redefining MSA's main

priority as education of students, rather than
activism.
RYNGAERT SAID MSA now takes itself too
seriously, and called the Assembly a "parliamentary
pre-school." He said Realistic would strive to help
Assembly members put MSA in the proper
perspective.
One small party this year is not a new
organization-the Spartacus Youth League has run
in MSA elections before. SYL presidential candidate
Bruce Richard said his party is "using the election as
a platform to expose the students to the policies we
represent."
SYL wants to abolish the administration and have
a student-worker-teacher union run the University.
The party also advocates doing away with tuition,
and supports open admissions.
SYL proposes that the state pay a stipend to
students so they can receive an education without
having to worry about supporting themselves.

RUN- A-THON
for the
MARCH OF DIMES
1:00, Saturday, April 5th
Meet at the Nichols Arboretum Parking Lot
FREE PICNIC FOR PARTICIPANTS
AFTER THE RUN
For More Info and Sponsor Sheets go to
NORTH HALL or any ANN ARBOR BANK

'U' Lawyer's Club
rates increase 9%

ICEANDAIR ITO EUROPE
BIG BIRD
LOW FARE

Daily PhotobyPAUL ENGSTROM
JIM KALYVAS, a second year law student, studies in his room in the
Lawyer's Club. The cost of room and board for Law Quadrangle residents
will rise 9 per cent next fall.

e....
FILMS
School of Natural Resources-Territorio Amazonas, Venezuela, noon,
School of Natural Resources.
School of Public Health-Noontime Film Fest-Eat, Drink and Be Wary;
The Real, Singing, Talking Action Movie About Nutrition; Soopergoop; 12:10
0p.m., School of Public Health.
Aud. II
School of Natural Resources-Environmental Film Series-City Far-
instead; The Energy Crunch: The Best Way Out; Solar Promise; 7 p.m.,
Angell Hall, Aud. B.
Ann Arbor Film Co-op-Mad Wednesday (The Sin of Harold Diddlebock, 7
p.m., Laurel and Hardy: Beau Hunks, 8:40 p.m., MLB, Aud. 3.
Cinema Guild-It Happened One Night, 7, 9:15 p.m., Old A&D (Lorch Hall)
Aud.
Cinema Two-Hail the Conquering Hero, 7, 10 p.m., Christmas in July,
8:45 p.m., Angell Hall, Aud. A.
Alternative Action-Lord of the Rings, 7, 9:30 p.m., MLB, Aud. 4.
Mediatrics-Tall Man With One Black Shoe, 7, 9 p.m., Natural Science
Aud.-
Gargoyle Films-The African Queen, 7:07, 9:09 p.m., 100 Hutchins Hall.
SPEAKERS
Center for South and Southeast Asian Studies-Philip Cunningham, "Thai
News Magazines," noon, lane Hall Commons.
LSA Senior Faculty Lecture Series-Gerald Else, "The Humanities That
*May Be," 8p.m., Rackham Amphitheatre.
School of Metaphysics-"Mind and It's Divisions," 7:30 p.m., 219% N.
Main St.
Urban and Regional Planning-Lisa Peattie, "Research, Planning, Prac-
tice and Poverty," 1 p.m., North Campus Art and Architecture Bldg., Rm.
2216-19.
College of Engineering-Arthur Hale, "General Substructure Synthesis
Method for the Dynamic Simulation of Complex Structures," 3 p.m., 107
Aerospace.
College of Engineering-Nuclear Engineering Colloquium, 3:45 p.m., 15
Cooley Bldg., call 764-4262 for information.
PERFORMANCES
UAC Musket-"Godspell,".8 p.m., Power Center.
Canterbury Loft-Edward Bond play, "Harsh Realities and Holy Days,'' 8
p.m., 332 S. State.
Ark-Red Clay Ramblers, 9 p.m., 1421 Hill.
Dance Department-Larry Ham, Nadine Tringali, "Reminiscing," A
Dance Thesis Concert, 8 p.m., Dance Dept., Studio A.
WCBN-Pro-Jams, "A Friday Afternoon Paradise," 3-5:30 p.m., 88.3 FM.

By MAURA CARRY
In 1940, when the University Lawyers
Club was young, room and board in the
elegant dormitory for law students was
about $322 a year. Inflation has taken
its toll over the years, and residents of
the Club next year will be paying $2885
for the same type of room-an increase
of over 9 per cent from last year's rate.
This rate increase-recently
approved by the club's Board of
Governors-is about average for the
Law Quard residence hall, according to
Building Director Diane Nefranowicz.
The Board of Regents recently
approved an 11.2 per cent 1980-81 rate
increase for the University's 13
traditional residence halls.
Less than one third of the University
Law students actually live in the
Lawyer's Club, which houses 316
students this year. Nefranowicz
explained that the club, unlike other
residence halls, exists on its own, and is
distinct from the Law school and from
other University housing. It relies
totally on student payments for
support, and the management is
contracted through the University
housing office.
The club itself, as well as the Law
School and Martha Cook residence hall,
was donated to the University by
William Cook, an 1882 Law school
graduate. Cook, who practiced law in
New York City until 1930, donated a
total of $16 million to the University
during his lifetime.
ORIGINALLY DESIGNED to hold
260 students, the Lawyer's Club started
out in 1924 as a single wing structure on
State Street. Successive wings were
added in 1927 and 1930. The final
addition was the Law School itself.
Waiter service and professional
tailoring were some of the services
offered to residents in the early days of
the club. Many of these luxuries can't
be found today, but residents still eat
from real silver flatware and feast on
steak every Thursday night.
Nefranowicz said that the Lawyer's
Club is an ideal place for Law students
to live. "Students have a lot 'of input
here," she said. "They have the ability
to make significant changes if they
want." Students voted this year on cuts
and additions in the new increased
budget.
RUSSEL RUA, a second term law
student, said one of the advantages of
living in the Lawyer's Club is its
proximity to classes. "It gives you a
chance to interact with other law
students," he added.
Another resident, Dale Stephenson,
said that the Lawyer's Club has its
State court
backs funds
for abortion
(Continued from Page1)
court decision saying it was "not per-
suaded that the questions presented
should be reviewed by this court."
Justices Thomas Kavanagh and
Mennen Williams indicated they would
have accepted the appeal.
Ryan, in his dissent, called the case
one with "constitutional, moral,
human, political and fiscal dimensions
and now, in light of the court of appeals
decision, jurisprudential dimensions as
well."
"If this case is not a case of sufficient
importance for this court to decide,
what case will be?" he asked.
Medieval and
Renaissance Collegium
MARC Student Housing
fall end Winter 1980-8 1

Would you like to live in an elegant
neo-Tudor mansion (East Quad)? Dinina hall.

disadvantages, and that he would not be
returning to the Club next term. "You
can't get away from it during exams
and stuff," Stephenson said. "There's a
lot of tension."
Nefranowicz said that most of the
residents of the club are first and
second year students, and that usually
about half of the incoming first year
students choose to live at the club.
THE CLUB ALSO has six guestrooms
whicha re usually filled by visiting
professors from other law schools and
guest lecturers. "The students have a
chane to interact with the profs and
lecturers," Nefranowicz said.
Noreste,
Admissions
August '80 applicants 4-year fully
recognized and established Mexican
Medical School, with several hun-
dred American students enrolled.
Use English language textbooks
and exams in English. School com-
bines quality education, small
classes, experienced teachers,
modern facilities.
Universidad Del Noreste
120 East 41 St., NY, NY 10017
(212) 594-6589 or 232-3784

$49
Roundtrip from
New York
to Luxembourg

9$5,33'
Roundtrip
from Chicago
to Luxembourg

No restrictions
Confirmed reservations* free wine with dinner, cognac after*
no restrictions on stays to 1 yr. or advance purchase. Prices valid
from U.S. from March 10 thru May 14, 1980. All schedules and
prices subject to change and government approval. Purchase
tickets in the U.S.
---1
Se travel agent or write Dept. #CN
IcelandairP.O. Box 105,
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alinrNYC, 757-8585; elsewhere, call 800-555-1212 for the
tl-ree number in your area.
Please send me: Q An Icelandair flight timetable.
Q Your European Vacations brochure.
Name
Address
CityI
StateZip
-.
.1ICELANDAIRw I
L. till-your best value to Europe-

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