100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 04, 1980 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-04-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

a6

-.CAMP NATCHEZ
LEADING NEW ENGLAND CO-ED CHILDREN'S CAMP
Located in the Berkshire Mountains on our own Natural
Lake-Looking for Energetic, Committed Outdoor People
Positions Available:
WATERSKIING, TENNIS, SOCCER, CERAMICS, CRAFTS, GENERAL ATHLETICS,
PHOTOGRAPHY, ECOLOGY, PIONEERING, CAMPCRAFT, SAILING, W.S.I.,
AND GENERAL COUNSELORS
RECRUITER ON CAMPUS THURSDAY, APRIL 10
CONTACT PLACEMENT SERVICE, 764-7456
Brondeis University
AMERICAN SCHOOLS OF
ORIENTAL RESEARCH
ARCHAEOLOGICALO
SEMESTER IN ISRAEL

Page 2-Friday, April 4, 1980-The Michigan Daily
Fed report charges
TMI accident caused
unfounded worries

Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press international reports

What does it offer you?
" a semester of study in Israel in the spring term
" course work in English in archaeology, both history
and methodology, and in related fields
" several weeks of active participation in an
on-going dig
" study tours to important archaeological sites
" optional language study in Hebrew or Arabic
Application deadline: November 1
For further information, see your study
abroad advisor or write:

WASHINGTON (AP) - A
congressional subcommittee said
yesterday the accident at the Three
Mile Island nuclear plant a year ago
has caused uhfounded worries about
nuclear energy.
"The greatest harm from the Three
Mile Island accident was its severe
emotional impact on an ill-informed
and easily frightened public, especially
near the plant," said Rep. Mike Mc-
Cormack (D-Wash.), chairman of the
subcommittee.
"This emotional damage was
severely aggravated by the continued
sensational treatment of the story by
much of the press and media."
THE REPORT was sharply criticized
by two members of the panel, Reps.
Howard Wolpe (D-Mich.), and Richard
Ottinger (D-N.Y.).
They claimed the report was a classic
example of blaming the victim. The
major recommendations of the report
sidestep the issue of nuclear safety, ac-
cording to Wolpe and Ottinger.
"According to the report, it is an
uninformed public, rather than the ac-
cident at Three Mile Island, that is to be
blamed for the present widespread
concern about the competence of the
nuclear industry and the adequacy of
Daily Official Bulletin
FRIDAY, APRIL 4. 1980
Daily Calendar:
Center for South & Southwestern Asian Studies:
Philip Cummingham, "Thai News Magazine," Lane
Commons, noon.
CEW: A Financial Aid Information Clinic Brown
Bag Lunch, 328 Thompson, noon.
Urban & Regional Planning: Lisa Peattie, Resear-
ch, Planning Practice and Poverty," 2216 Art & Ar-
ch, 1 p.m.
Physics/Astronomy: A. Yahil, SUNY, "The
Deceleration of Nearby Galaxies & the Mass Content
of the Universe," 807 Dennison, 4 p.m.
LSA: Distinguished Sr. Faculty Lecture, Gerald F.
Else, "T*# Humanities that May Be," Rackham
Amph., 8 p.m.

nuclear safety regulation," they said.
THE ENERGY subcommittee of the
House Committee on Science and
Technology said that "although it may
not have been apparent to the public at
the time of the accident, a disaster was
never imminent" at Three Mile Island
near Harrisburg, Pa., just one year
ago.
Two other reports have stressed the
need for new safeguards in the nuclear
power industry.
Last January, a report prepared for
the Nuclear Regulatory Commission
(NRC) said similar accidents could
happen at a number of plants and
recommended future nuclear in-
stallations be built at least 10 miles
from any city.
LIKE AN earlier report by a
presidential commission, it also urged
replacing the NRC with a single ad-
ministrator. And it said licensing
procedures should be tightened before
any new plants are approved for con-
struction.
The McCormack subcommittee
report, however, said that "continued
delay in. licensing of new plants is
beyond that necessary to assure the
adequate safety of nuclear power plan-
ts."
In their dissent, Wolpe and Ottinger
said the report depended almost ex-
clusively on nuclear power advocates
who testified before the panel.
"Ultimately it will be for the
American people, and not for advocates
of nuclear energy, to determine the ac-
ceptability of the risks of nuclear
power," they said.
Wolpe and Ottinger also said the
report would further damage public
confidence in the objectivity of
Congress.
McCormack told a news conference
that radioactivity whicif escaped from
the Three Mile Island plant was so
minimal that there is far more
background radiation in other parts of
the country.

l I .

Office of International Programs
Brandeis University
Waltham, MA 02254
617- 647-2422

Brandeis University admits students of any race, color, national
or ethnic origin, sex, age or hdndicap to all its programs
and activities.

-I

Cutbacks to idle 76,000
DETROIT - Production cutbacks by the Big Three automakers at 23
U.S. car and truck assembly plants next week are expected to idle 76,310
workers for at least one week. Ironically, long-term unemployment in the
auto industry has declined for the fourth straight week to 160,000 indefinitely-
idled U.S. hourly workers.
The cutbacks are blamed on a continuing decline in sales and produc-
tion. U.S. car output so far this year lags 25 per cent behind last year, while
sales are off nearly 11 per cent. Truck production is off 52 per cent.
Senate proposes budget cuts
WASHINGTON - The Senate Budget Committee voted yesterday to
eliminate federal revenue sharing for states and cut the federal bureaucracy
by five per cent across the board, as it nears completion of a balanced 1981
budget.
In its proposed budget, the Senate panel voted to eliminate Saturday
mail delivery, phase out 200,000 CETA public service jobs, cut the food
stamp program, and trim student loan programs among others.
Last month, the House Budget Committee proposed a $611.8 billion 1981
budget that also contained less money for defense and more for domestic
programs than the Senate committee's version.
Lance acquitted of conspiracy
ATLANTA - A federaljudge said yesterday he would order former
federal director Bert Lance acquitted on charges of bank fraud conspiracy.
That will leave intact 32 specific allegations of fraud against Lance and three
associates.
U.S. District Judge Charles A. Moye Jr. said evidence presented by the
government during the 12-week trial could not be considered proof of a con-
spiracy. The government plans to wrap up'its case with evidence from five
FBI agents who analyzed bank records that are evidence in the case. But
their testimony will be confined to the specific transactions involved in the
remaining counts of the indictment.
Bristol riot stuns Britain
BRISTOL, England - Rock and bottle-throwing battles between up to
3,000 youths and outnumbered, unarmed policemen exploded Wednesday in
a decayed area of Bristol when police raided a black-patronized cafe and
fighting broke out.
THere were no deaths but 21 policemen and eight civilians were
hospitalized with injuries from the night-long disorders in the port city 110
miles west of London. Insurance assessors said damage claims could ap-
proach more than $2 billion.
Some black residents said police harassment and discrimination had the
black community ready to explode. Home Secretary William Whitelaw told
the House of Commons in London that it was "not in any sense a race riot."
Inflation fighters thanked
WASHINGTON-President Carter yesterday thanked retail grocers
and druggists for their "patriotic and helpful" price freezes. Carter invited
food and drug executives to the White House to show his appreciation for
their voluntary participation in his price control program.
The White House said 6,796 food stores froze prices for 30 to 150 days. In
addition, 21 drug chains representing more than 2,800 stores informed the
White House they have price ceiling programs lasti gfor60 to 90 days.
Safeway, A and P and Grand Union, three of the nation's largest grocery
chains, announced they would continue price controls for another 30 days.
Palestinian activist detained
JERUSALEM - Israel detained a leading Palestinian activist for
questioning yesterday, and Israeli rightists mounted pressure on Prime
Minister Menachem Begin to refuse to make concessions in summit talks
with President Carter this month.
In continuing efforts to quell the wave of unrest in the occupied West
Bank of the Jordan River, Israeli authorities called Dr. Ahmed Bamzi Nat-
she to the military police headquarters in Bethlehem. Natshe allegedly had
made an anti-Israeli speech at a Palestinian rally in the West Bank town of
Hebron on Wednesday.
Locomotive crash releases
toxic gas over Boston
SOMERVILLE, Mass. - 74 persons were hospitalized and 2,000 others
evacuated when clouds of toxic gas wafted over the Boston area early
yesterday.
According to officials, a Boston & Maine locomotive struck a tank car
carrying 1,300 gallons of phosphorus trichloride, a chemical used in water
treatment. The car was bound for a Monsanto Chemical plant in Everett,
Mass.

A ' '' U
THE GREAT VIGIL OF EASTER
UALB SATURDAY, APRIL 5-8 p.m.
Striking of the New Fire.
Lighting of the Paschal Candle and Procession.
Chanting of the Easter Proclamation.
Reading of the Prophecies.
Holy Baptism and Renewal of the Baptismal Covenant.
$.0 VI~The First Eucharist of Easter.
ST. CLARE'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
2309 PACKARD ROAD 4 blocks E. of Stadium
! A RBOR.g.EASTER SUNDAY SERVICES: 8,10, noon
AE215 S. STAE ST.- ANNABR
(ABVEJASON'S ICE CREAM SHOP)**** ** ************
STEVE'S LUNCH
* *
We Serve Breakfast A l/1Day *
FIRST VISIT FREE *
* TrY Our Famous 3 Egg Omelet *
*
-X. with your choice of fresh bean sprouts, mushrooms,
". . IN RATEa * green peppers, onion, ham, bacon, and cheese.
6 4See Us Also For Our Lunch & Dinner Menus
1313 S. University Open Tues.-Fri. 8-7, Sat., Sun. 9-7 *
*-*

S

S

DO0 YOU1HA YE AH INTEREST?
IN PHOTOGRAPHY?
IN GRAPHICS?
IN BUSINESS?

-IN WRITIN
If you do, we want
you to work for the
1981 MICHIGANENSIAN.
New Staff Meeting:
Tues., April 8, 7:00 p.m.
at StUdent PUblCations

IGO
((f j {A

Jlb AEd&ign Baig
(USPS344-900)
Volume XC, No. 146
Friday, April 4, 1980
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings'during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109.
Subscription rates: $12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail
outside Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday
mornings. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.:Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109.
The Michigan Daily is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to United Press International,
Pacific News Service, Los Angeles Times Syndicate and Field Newspaper SynCdicate.
News roomy (313r 764.0552 76-DAILY: Sports desk.764-0562:Circulation: 764-0558:Classified advertising:
764-0557: Display advertising: 764-0554: Billing: 7640550: Composing Room: 76.4-0556.

',

I

Editor-in-chief ..........
Managing Editor.:.......
City Editor ............
University Editor.......
Editorial Page Editors ..
Magazine Editors........
Arts Editors............
Sports Editor .. .
Executive Sports Editors ...
NEWS STAFF WRITERS:

MARK PARRENT
-MITCH CANTOR
...PATRICIA HAGEN
.TOMAS MIRGA
.... JOSHUA PECK
HOWARD WITT
ELISA ISAACSON
R.J. SMITH
MARK COLEMAN
DENNIS HARVEY
.ALAN FANGER
....... ELISA FRYE
GARY LEVY
SCOTTAEWIS
Arlen Afremow. Saro

Business Manager---------ROSEMARY WICKOWSKI
Sales Manager............ ...... DANIEL WOODS
Operations Manager...--------..KATHLEEN CULVER
Display Manager.............KRISTINA PETERSON
Classified Manager.......... .... SUSAN KLING
Nationals Manager...........ROBERT THOMPSON
Finance Manager.GREGG HADDAD
Circulation Manager...............JMES PICKETT
Ad Coordinator..................PETE PETERSEN
BUSINESS STAFF: Patricia Barron, Maxwell Benoliel
Joseph Brodo.. Courtney Costeel, Randi Cigelink,
Dnno Drebin. Aida Eisenstot. Barbara Forslund. Alisso
Goldfoden..Jeffrey Gotheim. Leslie Graham. Michael

on *E w A to - -- -

E

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan