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April 02, 1980 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-04-02

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I

The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, April 2, 1980-Page 9
U'

Blue netters
victor0s M
Kazoo match
By DAN CONLIN
In a meet taking just two hours, the
Michigan women's tennis team rolled
over Kalamazoo in last night's match,
9-0.
Coach Ollie Owens had hopes to test
his team before the weekend when it,
travels to play Wisconsin, Friday, and
Northwestern, Saturday.
"I was really disappointed in
Kalamazoo," said Owens. "I had hoped
for a tough match, but nobody on our
team lost more than two games. I guess
we'll have to call this one a 'confidence
builder."'
Kathy Karzan,..the number one
singles player, had the most trouble for
the Wolverines with her Kalamazoo
opponent, but won 6-2, 6-1.
Sue Weber, a junior playing number
two singles, had an easy time with her
match, winning 6-1, 6-1. Jill Hertzman,
a freshman walkon from -Louisville,
also won by the score of 6-1, 6-1.
Ann Kercher, pebbie Klein and
Robbie Risdon all won their matches, 6-
1, 6-.
The doubles competition went along
the same lines as the singles matches
when Karzan and Risdon teamed to
win a decisivie 6-1, 6-0 victory.
Kereher and Hartzman, playing
number two doubles, defeated their
opponents, 6-2, 6-0. Weber and Klein
rounded out the Kalamazoo match
with a 6-0,6-0 win.
With the upcoming Wisconsin and
Northwestern matches the team has
added more practice time to its
schedule. Luckily the weather has
changed and the team can move to the
outdoor courts.
"We wait for the football team to
finish and then we get the Track and
Tennis Building, said Owens. "We''re
managing to get more time. If we can't
get courts inside, we look outside."
' Last weekend the Wolverine netters
met Miami of Ohio and were defeated
5-4. The team had almost no practice
time before that' match, but were
confident a of a win. This weekend, with
both matches on the road, the women
will welcome the extra practice time.

The Sporting Views

Baseball walkout.. .

By JON MORELAND
The Association of Major League
Baseball Players has voted by a count
of 967-1 in favor of a strike at the begin-
ning of this year's baseball season. The
threatened strike is scheduled to begin
in the next day or two.
With numbers like this, it appears
that the threatened strike is imminent.
There is only one sensible answer to
these players when they threaten to
boycott the season's opening day: "Go
ahead and strike."
Never has any employment group
had so many benefits and received so
much in compensation as modern
major league baseball players. Their
union is one of the strongest, and their
leader, Marvin Miller, is one of \the
most influential men in the history of
labor-management relations.
It is time the baseball owners wised
up and put an end to a situation that has
gotten completely out of control.
Of course, the major issue in the con-
flicts between the players and owners is
that of free-agency.
Prior to the Basic Agreement signed
in 1976, baseball operated under the
reserve clause. Under this system, a

player who was drafted by a major
league team was legally bound to that
team until he was traded, retired, of
death did them part.
Through the efforts of players like
Curt Flood and Andy Messersmith, the
reserve clause was ruled uncon-
stitutional and the present free agent
system was instituted. Under this
system, any player with six or more
years of service, who for any number of
reasons (including salary) wishes to
leave his team, can declare himself a
free agent and sell himself to the
highest bidder, leaving his former team
with virtually nothing in return.
Neither of these systems is fair. No
player should be bound to anyone for
life. By the same token, a team that has
spent a large amount of money on a
player, and one that has developed him
in their farm system, should not be left
empty-handed when he decides to
leave.
As it is now, the players have too
much freedom - and they're asking for
more. One of their demands during this
year's negotiation process is a reduc-
tion in the number of "binding" years

from six to four.
What baseball needs is a system
similar to the one currently used in
professional basketball and football.
Under football's so-called Rozelle Rule,
a team that signs players from other
teams must provide equal compen-
sation to the player's former team: If
the teams involved cannot reach an
agreement on the degree of compen-
sation, the commissioner is then em-
powered to settle the dispute. This
system allows a player more mobility,
but discourages teams from freely
grabbing all the available quality free-
ageAts.
The owners, a supposedly fraternal
order of entrepreneurs, continue to stab
each other in the back whenever they
see a chance to make the slightest im-
provement in their team. The result:
some highly intensive bidding wars and
a rash of multi-year, multi-million
dollar contracts.
' As for the players themselves, many
of them have transcended the bounds of
greed into sheer financial barbarism.
Over the winter, 33-year-old Nolan
Ryan signed a $4 million contract, one

wih bye-bye bo
which will extend until he's 37. Ryan,
whose lifetime record is just above the
.500 mark, finished the 1979 season with
a less-than-phenomenal 16-14 slate,
while pitching for a division winner.
But Ryan wasn't the only instant
millionaire to emerge from free-agent
negotiations. J9hn Curtis (10-9 in 1979)
and Rennie Stennett (.238 average last
year), have signed contracts worth $2
million and $3 million, respectively. A
bit ridiculous, you might say.
Those in the players' corner argue
that not all players travel the free-
agent road, and that for every
millionaire, there s a guy at the other
end of the spectrum who's making only
$40,000 per year. But with the median
income for a family hovering down
near the $17,000 mark, I find it difficult
to shed any tears for these so-called
poor, oppressed players.
While the average salary of major
league players has nearly quadrupled
in the last eight years, the players
remain dissatisfied, They're asking for
more. They're unhappy with a pension

system that provides security for any
player who stays with a club for four
years, and pays him $1,276 a month if'he
can stick around for ten years.
Let's see how long the players hdld
out when those fat paychecks stop
streaming in. Let's see what happens
when the public realizes that life goes
on - season or no season. I have a
feeling they'll be back, on their hanids
and knees, before they've lost too many
at-bats to make a stab at a 40 home rin
season.

SCORES
EXHIBITION BASEBALL
Minnesota 5, Chicago (A) 3
Texas 4, Philadelphia 1(71/2innings)
Boston I, Montreal 0
Atlanta 7, Houston E
San Diego 5. San Fiancisco 4
Oakland 8, Seattle 3
California 9, Cleveland 6
Los Angeles 3, New York (A) 3 (5%innings)
Milwaukee, S.Chicago (N) 5 (5% innings)
Pittsburgh vs. Detroit, ppd., rain

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EXPERIENCE KEY TO SUCCESS
Softbaliers show promise

By LEE KATTERMAN
The sun will shine on the Michigan
women's softball team this spring,
whether or not the skies are clear, says
Coach Gloria Soluk.
That's because the Wolverine sof-
tballers, coming off an impressive 20-8
season, are back with nearly the entire
1979 squad intact. In addition, Soluk
recruited some of the state's best prep
players to fill out the team.
"We had an excellent pitching staff
and good defense last year," said Soluk.
"With the addition of the pitching
machine, our hitting should improve."
And that leads Soluk to the conclusion
that the Wolverines have a good chance
at winning the state title.
At the core of Soluk's team is pitcher
Theresa Gardocki, who earned the
nickname "Smoke" for the fastball
which carried her to a 13-1 record last
year. Filling out the pitching staff are
sophomores Julie Zyjewski and Laura
Reed, plus freshvoman Sandra Taylor.
Catcher Sheryl Tominac injured her
throwing arm and won't be back. But

her replacement is Diane Ashcraft, a
first-year player who came to Michigan
with pitcher Taylor from Royal Oak
Dondero's state championship team.
Of all the remaining spots on the
field, only right field is likely to be filled
by a newcomer.
At first _is sophomore Tammie San-
ders, a strong hitter capable of
reaching the fences. Second base will
probably go to Sue Burk, a senior from
Bay City.
On the left side, last year's infielders
switched spots; sophomore kDiane Hat-
ch will take shortstop, while Jeannette
Dillay moves to third.
Left fielder is Amy Ames, who has
completely recovered from a knee in-
jury suffered during basketball season.
Sophomore Debbie Haines gets the nod
in center, with right field still up for
grabs.
But the weather will have its role in
determining the Wolverines' success.
With their first doubleheader of the
short season already cancelled,
Michigan faces some stiff competition

in Michigan State in a doubleheader
this afternoon at East Lansing.
The poor weather has also prevented
Michigan from getting outdoors for
practice, so it will be an untested team
facing the Spartans today.
Soluk hopes that a full schedule, in-
cluding four weekend tournaments will
adequately prepare her squad for
May's state championship.
The one disappointment for Soluk
was Western Michigan's request to
cancel its game with, the Wolverines.
The Broncos, a perennial softball
powerhouse, asked to be released from
its commitment so it could participate
in the Indiana Tournament.
"I was very upset with the with-
drawal," said Soluk. "It was very un-
professional."
However, she remarked that
Michigan will probably meet Western
in a tournament.
If both the Wolverines and Broncos
are as good as Soluk says, it's likely
they'll meet in the state finals.

ARE WE LOOKING FOR YOU?
We're looking for the man who knows what he
wants from college life; the man who has the
determination and ability to build his own fra-
ternity in his own way.
P1 LAMBDA PHI-WERE COMING BACK!!
Pi Lam can offer You the following advantages:
* Charter membership in an international
fraternity of the United States and Canada
" Immediate leadership opportunities
* No hazing
" High standards for scholarship
* Local alumni support
* House available in September
* A chance to broaden friendships and make
new ones
* A challenge!!
If this interests you, talk to your friends and
then call me, Ezra Krieg at 995-8983. If I'm not
there, please leave your name and number.
! 4

GROTE-LED KNICKS WIN TITLE:
IM hoop tourney aids officials

r.=
v M

SOUTHWICK MI
IMPORTANT FOREI(
STATEMEN\

EKES AN

NBA
Ptayoffs
First Round
Best of Three
.'EASTERN CONFERENCE
Wednesday's Games
Washington at Philadelphia
San Antonio at Houston
Friday's Games
Philadelphia at Washington
Houston at San Antonio
Sunday's Games
Washington at Philadelphia,
if necessary
San Antonio at Houston, if necessary
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Wednesday's Games
Kansas City at Phoenix
Portland at Seattle
Friday's Games
Phoenix at Kansas City
Seattle at Portland
Sunday's Games
Kansas City at Phoenix, if necessary
Portland at Seattle, if necessary
Second Round
Best of Seven
EAS TERN CONFERENCE
Washington-Philadelphia winner vs.
Atlanta
San Antonio-Houston winner vs. Boston
iIL'CTL~vaAT 'l3NT.'1:7?T.1V'T

By GREG DEGULIS
If Steve Grote ran circles around
most guards during his four years on
the Michigan basketball team, then
nobody could a bunch of intramural
players to handlehim.
They couldn't, and Grote, Wolverine
wide receiver Fred Brockington, and
several other more-than-just-weekend
cagers calling themselves the Knicks,
knocked off defending intramural
champion White Shadows, 77-64, Sun-
day, to win the second annual Michigan
Open Officials Tournament.
THE TOURNAMENT is a relatively
unique concept to intramural basket-
ball. Sponsored and conducted entirely
by officials from the IM department,
the prestigious field included teams the
department's Independent, Fraternity,

and Graduate divisions, plus teams
from Central Michigan and the Univer-
sity of Detroit.
Bill Gregg, one of three officials who
organized the tournament, said one-
third of'the tournament proceeds were
channelled into a fund which will be
used to develop a referee's library con-'
taming movies and magazines.
With two years of organizing ex-
perience in hand, Gregg said he plans
"to get letters out next fall to other
schools and let them know what's going
on earlier."
By glancing at the All-Tournament
selections below, one gets the feeling
that the Officials All Star team could
put up an excellent fight with the
Michigan varsity:
Brian McKann........Michigan Law

Mike Harden.......Kappa Alpha Psi
Fred Brockington ..... White Shadows
Len Lillard .......... White Shadows
Steve Grote ................... Knicks
Kent Storey ................... Knicks
Tom Schrieberger ............. Knicks
Join The Daily
SrSa

N POLICY
FT
Southwick has combined
Chinese silk, Irish linen, and
Falkland Island wool in a '
Scottish mill for the American
gentleman. The result is a '
luxuriant, all-natural, excep-;
tionally comfortable spring
and summer fabric, tailored i0
the classic natural-shoulder
Southwick tradition.
We take considerable pride
in all of the fine Southwick !
jackets and suits that we offeL'
It just so happens we think'
the world of this one.
B
,M
Also see- our fine collection's
of slacks. In plain and pat-
tern fabrics. Many washable. R
N.
S'
pan l oiti
State St. at the Arcade '

BILLBOARD

PITCHER
NIGHT
at
ti out#,
1140 South University
668-8411

Michigan's baseball team
will face Toledo University in
doubleheader at Ray Fischer

Stadiumtoday. The starting
time of the first game will be
1:00 p.m.

92

Exhibition Baseball

American League

National League

The All
et.
67
88
26
2M

Media Company
presents:

BETWEEN

Minnesota .............
Kansas City.........
Oakland .............
Toronto ...............
New York...... ...
Boston .............
Cleveland .............
Milwaukee ..........
Chicago ...............
Detroit...............
Texas .. ............
California.........
Baltimore .............
Seattle .............

.L-.

W
15
15
13
10
10
11
10
10
11
11
10
8
6

L
6
8
7
7
8
9
10
10
12
13
14
11
-14
12

Pet.
.714
.652
.650
.588
.556
:555
.500
.500
.475
.435
.417
.353
.333
.333

San Francisco.......
Los Angeles.........
Atlanta............
Montreal..........
Philadelphia.........
St. Louis...............
Chicago ....... ....
Pittsburgh ............
San Diego .............
Cincinnati ...........
Houston.............
New York..........

W
14
10
10
10
10
10
10
9
8
9
6
5

L
7
7
9
9
9
9
10
9
10
13
11
11

Pc
.51
.5;
5'

g

.526
.526
.500
.500
.444
.409
.353
.313

JO1BS
an original rock musical/drama
April 3, 4, 5; 8:00 p.m.
Lydia Mendellsohn
Theatre
in the Michigan League
TICKETS $2.00 reserved

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,w IW A A WIN& - -'W VAf-4

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