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April 02, 1980 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-04-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


Page 8-Wednesday, April 2, 1900-The Michigan Dc
Harper, M
Sources close to the Michigan Derek Harper o
Pasketball team dismissed as "sheer will inform Mic
..rumor" a report that Clarkston All- April 9, the
State center Tim McCormick has national letters
decided to attend Ohio State this fall. Harper, like
The report, broadcast yesterday by sidering only th
radio station WJR in Detroit, said the 6- Illinois and F
40% McCormick would reveal his possibility, UC
choice of schools to the media later this ched from his li
week.
MCCORMICK HAS narrowed his lits Matmen m
of schools to three: Michigan, Ohio
State and North Carolina. By BUDD
Another coveted prep star, 6-4 guard It's been. th

SPORTS OF THE DAILY
cCormick undecided

of Palm Beach, Florida,
chigan of his decision on
deadline for signing
of intent.
McCormick, is con-
ree schools - Michigan,
lorida State. A fourth
LA, was recently scrat-
st.
eer Japanese

Y MOOREHOUSE
hree weeks since

the

The University of Michigan Branch of
The Society of Automotive Engineers
Presents
Mr. Roy Lunn
American Motors Vice President of Product Engineering
Discussing
"The Development of the AMC Eagle"
The first American four wheel drive passenger car

collegiate wrestling season ended with
the NCAA tournament, but grappling
fans have one more chance this year to
see Michigan's wrestlers in action when
they take on the Japan World Cup Team
tonight at Crisler Arena.
"This is an excellent opportunity for
wrestling fans in this area to see some
outstanding international 'com-
petition," said Michigan assistant
coach Joe Wells. "The Japanese are
especially strong in the lower and mid-
dle weights."
THE JAPANESE team is just retur-
ning from the World Cup tournament in
Toledo, Ohio, held this past weekend. In
that tournament, the United States
defeated the Soviet Union for the first
time in history, 7-3, to win the crown.
The meet tonight will be different in
several respects from normal
collegiate wrestling. Instead of the
weight classes being in pounds, tonight
they will be metric. Also, the match will
feature all freestyle wrestling, which
varies somewhat from the collegiate
style. "In freestyle, there is less control
and no riding time," explained Wells.
The Japanese team has been staying
in Ann Arbor since the World Cup, and
after tonight's match they will head for
Grand Rapids, where they will be pitted
against grapplers from Grand Valley
and Ferris State.
The meet starts at 7 p.m., and tickets
are $1 for students and $2 for the
general public, available at the door.
Ruggers still unbeaten
The Michigan Rugby Club easily

defeated its opposition last Saturday,
sweeping a three-game set at Louis
Elbel Field.
The Wolverine 'A' squad continued its
undefeated season with a 58-4 rout of
Central Michigan, while the 'b's shut
out their Chippewa counterparts, 27-0.
SENIOR CENTER Billy Chung led
the 'A' side, scoring 18 points to pace a
blistering attack. Scrum half Kenny
Phillips added 11 points while second
rows Joe Bruce and Dave Kieras chip-
ped in eight and four points, respec-
tively. Center Rob Casslou also had
four.
Meanwhile, the Michigan 'C' side
shocked Flint's 'A' unit, 28-0. First-year
players Bill Forcht, Perry DiClemente
and Pete Spencer totaled four points
each as the Blue ruggers remained un-
beaten.
Next week Michigan travels to
Detroit to face the Detroit Rugby Foot-
ball Club.
-MARK CURRY
Laxers lose in Ohio
The Michigan lacrosse club, hoping to
rebound from an 11-8 defeat Sunday in
Columbus, entertains the University of
Detroit tonight at 8 p.m. on the Tartan
Turf, next to Ferry Field.
Michigan junior Tom Simon led the
stickmen's attack Sunday, tallying
three goals and one assist. Senior Bob-
by Fleischman had one goal and three
assists, while Bob Anderson added
three goals.

4

7:00 PM, Wednesday, April 2nd
Rm 311 West Engineering
Non-members welcome-Refreshments served

SPACE

CAMP AMARACK
HAS SUMMER POSITIONS FOR Cabin Counselors,
Arts & Crafts and Waterfront Specialists, Unit
Supervisors, Trippers, Bus Drivers, Nurses,
Secretaries, Cooks.
Interviewing April 9 and 17
Summer Placement
CALL 764-6456 FOR APPOINTMENT
FRESH AIR SOCIETY,
6600 W. Maple Rd., W. Bloomfield, Mi. 48033
(313) 661-0600

full court
PRE
Frieder steps in...
... makes no waves
By SCOTT M. LEWIS
W HEN MAJOR COLLEGE basketball programs change coaches, chaos
is often the immediate result. In many instances, it takes a large
chunk of the season for a new coach and his team to become accustomed to
each other's style, to reconcile any differences in game
philosophy-generally, to "feel each other out," as it is said.
Even UCLA's Larry Brown, who captured the fancy of fans everywhere
during the recent NCAA tournament, admits that the first month of the past
season was a disaster for his team. "Some Jewish guy from New York
comes to Los Angeles via Denver and starts messing these kids up," Brown
said last nonth, obviously referring to himself and the Bruins'8 start.
The Michigan basketball team is unlikely to' experience such severe
growing pains under the guidance of new head coach Bill Frieder. A disciple
of Johnny Orr the past seven years, Frieder is expected (by thiscorner) to
follow the course laid out by Orr for the current Wolverine squad, a course
which directed Michigan to the NIT quarterfinals last season and perhaps to
greater heights next season.
Orr and Frieder, who became close friends during the latter's tenure
here, are alike in a number of ways. These similarities will help make the
coaching transition smoother than would otherwise be the case.
Similar strategies
First of all, both men see today's game as "a combination and running
and delay" (Frieder's words). No more can teams rely on sheer speed to
dominate their opponents-especially Big Ten opponents-as the Rickey
Green-led Michigan units of the mid-and late-seventies once did. Nor can
they overwhelm their foes with height alone, as Minnesota tried to do last
season, A fine balance is needed, and both Orr and Frieder recognize this
fact.
Both coaches also place an inordinately heavy emphasis on
fundamentals. Orr's teams were characterized by their sound, disciplined
play-they had to be well-disciplined, since Orr never had a giant, dominant
center in the Joe Barry Carroll mold. Or's most productive pivotman
during his 12 years here was Phil Hubbard, a natural forward who stands
only 6-7.
Observing the team in practice during the past season, one came away
with the impression that running the Wolverine team was more than a one-
man production. Frieder was almost always alongside the head coach,
amplifying Orr's instructions, adding his own pointers and demonstrating
what should and shouldn't be done.
The two synthesized their individual approaches to the game into a
collective strategy. Their successes as a coaching team-and their high
regard for each other's abilities-can be explained in large part by their
similar attitudes and priorities relating to basketball.
Like Orr, Frieder has earned the respect of his colleagues. Michigan
State's Jud Heathcote remarked that "it would be a shame if Frieder was
not offered the head coaching job."
More important than the admiration from their peers, however, is the
respect they have earned from their players. Nearly all the players
appeared to like and1 respect Orr, a pleasant man with a folksy, down-home
sense of humor. Similarly, it is difficult to dislike or overlook the tireless
efforts of Frieder, whose loyalty to Michigan and dedication to his profession
are beyond question.
Many new coaches have the initial task of gaining the respect of their
players, a task which all too often is never fully completed. Fortunately for
Frieder, this is not a major concern here.
What concerns Frieder most at present is the recruiting war,
particularly the battle for Tim McCormick. McCormick has appeared on
these pages more frequently in recent days than Mike McGee, Thad
Garner-or Don Canham, for that matter. And there's a reason for all the
ink: McCormick has the potential to make a good team, like Michigan, into a
' great one.
Frieder, like Orr, is well aware of McCormick's abilities. So is Canham,
who, perhaps unknowingly, strengthened the Wolverines' chances of landing
the Clarkston standout by appointing Frieder.
When asked last week whether the change to coache~s at Michigan would
affect his decision, McCormick replied that, if Frieder becomes coach,
Michigan would remain one of his top choices (along with Ohio State and
North Carolina). If another coach received the nod, however, then Michigan
would be scratched from his list.

Red Wings consider
ousting GM Lindsay

DETROIT (AP)-Less than two
weeks after the dismissal of Detroit
Red Wings Coach Bobby Kromm,
published reports conclude that Ted
Lindsay, general manager of the
National Hockey League team, also is
on the way out.
Yesterday the Detroit News quoted
NHL sources who said it was "fairly
obvious" Lindsay's job of three years is
in jeopardy.

- I
a

LUNCH
AND A HALF

}

SPECIAL

Buy one bagel sandwich with
Lox or Roast Beef or Turkey or
Ham or Corned Beef or Pastrami

contacted by Wings' Vice President
Lincoln Calalieri, who could not
immediately be reached for comment.
His son, Robert, general counsel and
administrative director of Olympia
Stadium Corp. and the hockey team,
said Lindsay's dismissal was not "a
farfetched possibility," but claimed he
did not know whether it was under
consideration.
Lindsay, however, reportedly
exhorted his hockey players to help
save his job before the team's 9-7
victory over Quebec in Detroit on
Saturday. Lindsay reportedly told the
club, "it upsets me to think there's a
chance I'll be fired . . . it really hurts
me to fail at something I love so much."
Lindsay, 54, a Red Wings Hall of
Famer, led the club through a 23-41-16
season in 1978-79 for a last-place finish
in the Norris Division. With three.
games left this season, the Wings are
26-40-11, including Monday night's 7-5
loss to the New York Rangers. The
defeat chilled Detroit's hopes of
capturing the 16th and final berth in the
playoffs.

*It upsets me to think there's a
chance I'll befired... it really
hurts me to fail at something
that I love so much.'
-Ted Lindsay

:5

nd get ANY SECOND
on our extensive menu for

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1306 S. Univesit Open 7 Days 8:30 O.m.-11:00 p.m.
1 6 .U erty Until midnight Fri. 8 Sat.

BOILERMAKER COACH TO LEAVE?

FOUR REPLACEMENTS reportedly
are under consideration: Bill Watters,
a Toronto player agent who broke from
Alan Eagelson's sports management
group on Friday; former Toronto
Maple Leafs general manager Jim
Gregory; David Poile of the Atlanta
Flames; and James Devellano of the
New York Islanders.
The four reportedly have been

Rose interviewedf

-

COMING APRIL 8 COMING APRIL 22
LNIGHT HAWK SPECIAL 1-2-3-FREE SPECIAL

WEST LAFAYETTE (AP)-Coach
Lee Rose, whose Purdue Boilermakers
finished third in the NCAA basketball
tourney, is considering a coaching post
at the University of Southern Florida.
Rose, one of five candidates, went to
the Tampa campus Monday to be
interviewed for the new job. A decision
is expected today.
John Renneker, Southern Florida's
sports information director, said in
Tampa yesterday, "Rose is here in
Tampa today and will be interviewed
by our athletic director (Dick Bowers)

for the job."
Meanwhile, Purdue Athletic Director
George King said, "Lee and I had our
first discussion on this matter last week
and we made our offer to him. We didn't
get into any specifics on what Southern
Florida had offered because he had not
talked with them yet.
"Southern Florida did call and ask
permission to interview Lee, and that
request was granted. USF was the only
school that called asking permission to
interview him. Now, it's all up to Lee."

r USF job
The Journal & Courier said USF haA
about 20,000 students, no football
program and basketball is the. main
sport. The team ended its 10th season
this year with a 6-21 record.

U. I

11

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GatheringPlace of the Week
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SPORiTS EII1TOiP
BASEBALL
April 2 BOWLING GREEN (DH) 1:00
p.m.
April4 TOLEDO (DH)1:00p.m. j
April 5 at-Bowling Green, Ohio (DIH)
MEN'S TENNIS
April 4 ILLINOIS 2:30 p.m.
April 5 PURDUE 1:00 p.m.
WOMEN'S TENNIS
April4 Wisconsin, Minnesota at Madi-
son
April 5 Northwestern, Iowa at Evans-
ton, Illinois 4
WOMEN'S TRACK
April 5 Western Michigan at Kalama-
zoo
SOFTBALL
April 2 Michigan State (DH) at East
Lansing
April3 ALMA (DH) 3:00p.m.
April 5 Eastern Michigan (DH) at
Ypsilanti 4
LACROSSE
April 2 UNIVERSITY OF DETROIT
8:00 p.m.
April 5 University of Chicago, 8:00 p.m.
at Chicago, Illinois
April 6 Illinois, 2:00 p.m. at Cham-
paign

i

Complete
Alaskan King
Crab Leg Dinner
Served with a crisp green salad, vegetable,
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MUTAINm,

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