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March 27, 1980 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-03-27

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The Michigan Daily-Thursday, March 27, 1980-Page 7

ZZzzzzzz ..

ZZTop induces deafness at Crisler

W , By PATTI DIETZ
Sometimes being a music writer just
ain't all fun and glory. One of those
times was 5 p.m. Tuesday evening,
when my editor called up and rather
sternly assigned me to cover the ZZ Top
show at Crisler Arena that night. I
balked; I just didn't know enough of
these three Texans' material to feel
comfortable giving them a decent write
~a. But I like hard rock, an.d I know
hat sounds good. That, I thought, is
enough armament..
I hadn't seen so many bleary-eyed,
denim-and-black-leather clad, ten-
gallon hatted concert-goers in a long
time. "DISCO SUCKS" bumper
stickers were being peddled through
the crowd. A jerk in front of the stage
fervently waved the Texan flag, every
so often knocking his cowboy hat to the
floor. What, no cheap sungalsses?
Locals faves Cub Koda and The Poin-
ts adequately opened the show for this
beer-laced crowd. The Detroit-based
conglomeration of former members of
Vlugsy and Koda, once with Brown-
,ville Statibn (remember "Smokin' In
T'he Boys' Room"? Wouldn't it be grand
to forget it?), offered some hard rockin'
material from a forthcoming album, all
'f which sounded vaguely familiar.
These boys know only one riff, and not
even an inspiring one, at that. Their
stage presence consisted of Koda
throwing a bird, spitting into the
spotlight (impressive, actually. A
ouple of feet at least), and trading
fingering pyrotechnics with Guitar
Joey who, I swear, looks like a chip-
munk with mane. Koda- and his band
lost my respect, as well as thie audien-
ce's interest, by singing "Lovin' you is
like putting sneakers on a rooster" with
a straight face.

AFTER WHAT seemed like an
overlong intermission, a black curtain
parted to reveal a suspended backdrop
of panelled mirrors, an awesome wall
of amplifiers that would make Van
Halen quake in their boots, and a neon
stage floor that, throughout the concert,
blinked in infantile patterns. It was

reminiscent of Disneyland's nighttime
Electric Light Parade. Much of the ef-
fect was lost on the main floor audien-
ce, though it was quite attractive'from
the loge seats where I stood for the
band's encore. But the mirror wall was
tacky in the same way a mirrored
bedroom ceiling is: it gives off a false

sense of intimacy, which says
something about ZZ Top in live perfor-
mance. If my pounding eardrums
didn't keep reminding me where I was,
I could've sworn I was watching two
Hasidic Jews attempt Ted Nugent
imitations, Lead singer and guitarist
Billy Gibbons and bassist Dusty Hill,
replete with straggly beards and black
hats, created so much noise from their
respective instruments that at times it
seemed as if their sound was sup-
plemented by tape, but this is idle
speculation. However, a synthesizer
tape was used during the group's
current single, "Cheap Sunglasses,"
which was sped up, and hence, suffered
from lack of care. In fact, most of ZZ
Top's material fares better on record,
where it is discernable, than live, where
it becomes jumbled, distorted, and
nothing more than a wall of electric
sound without shape.

time tonight?" as if to keep the crowd
awake and on its feet. The last time he
asked, he didn't bother to wait for the
audience's screaming anwer. He and
his buddies had already left the stage
prior to the encore, apparently not
caring to hear a reply this time.
In between performance and encore,
the mirror wall disappeared, and a
large movie screen was flown in behind
the stage. A rear-screen projection of
the band members disguised as horn
players accompanied ZZ Top's encore;
in effect, they were playing with them-
selves. ZZzzzzzzzzzzz ..
ff.W.KI K:-m

&he
is preserved on
The Michigan Daily
420 Maynard Street
AND
Graduate Library

At C.IEIMVA IUIL) Tonight
STANLEY KUBRICK'S
LOLITA
JAMES MASON is smashing. His bathtub scene rivals the best
of the heyday of Hollywood. Peter Sellers plays a cast of thou-
sands and is lovable and nasty all at once. And SUE LYON
will always be Lolita to the world. With SHELLY WINTERS.
.7:00 & 9445 $1.50 At Old A&D

Exuding their usual degree of macho cool, ZZTop had several thousand
ears ringing Tuesday night at Crisler arena. The hard-rock trio is currently
on the road to plug their first album in several years, Deguello. Lead guitarist
and singer Billy Gibbons is viewed above.

Palestinians protest decision to
settle Jews in West Bank town

From UP andAP .
HEBRON, Israeli-occupied West
Bank-Israeli soldiers blocked the third
Arab protest in three days against the
decision to settle Jews in all-Arab
Hebron yesterday, the first
anniversary of Israel's peace treaty
with Egypt.
Hebron mayor Fahd Kawasme, who
has angered Israeli leaders and the
military government by statements he
made following the Cabinet's decision
to set up two Jewish boarding schools in
his city, called a sit-in strike at the town
hall.
BUT A DOZEN armed Israeli
soldiers showed up to stop anyone but
municipal employees from entering the
building in the West Bank's second
largest city. Three green-bereted
border police with billy clubs and M-16
rifles barred the doors.
There were no incidents.
Kawasme said he will sponsor daily
acts of civil disobedience to protest the
Sunday decision that for the first time
allows a Jewish presence in one of the
Arab cities Israel has occupied since
1967. Previous settlements land outside
Arab population centers.
ON MONDAY, 700 angry West Bank
Arabs rallied in Hebron against the
decision and on Tuesday, a near-total
commerciarstrike shut down the West
Bank and Arab East Jerusalem.
West Bank military governor
Binyamin Ben-Eliezer gave Kawasme
' stiff reprimand Tuesday for saying
the "Zionist empire" will fall just like
the British and Nazi empires before it.
; Begin, in a broadcast message
narking the peace treaty's
anniversary, said "Not all our
problems have been solved" and
"There is still a long road ahead of us."
BUT HE AGAIN stressed that the
,peace accords with Egypt make no

provision that "might lead to a state
called Palestine or even a corridor
which might lead to it."
In addition to the confrontation
between Arabs and Jews in Hebron
Israel faces growing pressure from the
United States and Agypt to make
concessions in stalled negotiations over
autonomy for West Bank Arabs.

Further, Sunday's Hebron ;vote split
the Cabinet 8-6 with two abstentions.
Any defections from Begin's 65 seat
bloc in the 120-member Knesset could
end his majority and force new
elections.
DOVES IN the Cabinet appealed the
Hebron decision to a parliamentary
committee, but no final ruling is
expected until next month,

,.U

POETRY READING
with
Don Mager, Alvin Aubert,
and John Peter Beck
reading from their works.
THURS., MAR. 27-7:30 pm
ADMISSION FREE
REFRESHMENTS
GUILD HOUSE, 802 Monroe

NOON LUNCHEON
Soup and sandwich 75ยข
JACQUELYN WILSON,
Anthropologist:
"Is There a Relationship
Between the Draft and
Prisons ?"
FRIDAY, MARCH 28
GUILD HOUSE 802 Monroe

a

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