100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 23, 1980 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-03-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

10,

1

The Michigan Daily-Sunday, March 23, 1980-Page 3
SOVIE T INTER VENTION BLAMED:
Afghan famine predicted

NEW. DELHI, India (AP) - Soviet
intervention in Afghanistan and the
continuing guerrilla war is critically af-
fecting the country's agricultural
production and there could be a famine
later this year, according to reliable
reports reaching India.
"It's very serious, and the Soviets,
who have their own shortfall, are going
to have difficulties helping the Afghans.
People are going to starve, really,"
said a West European diplomat based
in Kabul. He was interviewed after his
recent arrival in New Delhi.
The diplomat and other sources, who
declined to be identified, predicted a 30
per cent to 50 per cent drop in
Afghanistan's grain output this year.
THE SOVIET-BACKED regime of
President Babrak Karmal has announ-
ced Afghanistan will import thousands
of tons of fertilizer and wheat seeds
from the Soviet Union. But an informed
Kabul resident interviewed here
predicted the shipments would not
arrive in time to help.
He noted road transport in
Afghanistan is uncertain because of at-
tacks by Moslem guerrillas who have
been battling a succession of Marxist
regimes for nearly two years along with
the Soviet troops that began moving in-
to the country in December. He also

said the traditional 'seed distribution
system, through feudal landlords,
collapsed in the past year because of a
hastily improvised land reform
scheme.
"SOME PEASANTS have been
reported refusing government-supplied
seeds and others will not plow because
they received parcels of land without
compensating the previous owners in
violation of Islamic law," the source:
said.

According to official Afghan
statistics, 72 per cent of the country's
labor force is directly or indirectly
engaged in agriculture, and many
peasants have left the land to join the
guerrillas.
Grain production reportedly dropped
20 per cent in 1979 from an estimated
four miillion tons the year before,
largely because of a poor snowfall.
Snow provides much of Afghanistan's
irrigation water.

CINEMA Il
QN G PRESENTS

I

WALKABOUT
(Nicholas Roeg, 1971)

Two European children, abandoned by their father in the Australian
outback, are saved by a young Aborigine boy. The friendship between
them is destroyed, however, as they near civilization and cultural
differences begin to intrude. A breathtaking film, both in its images and
vision of the world. With JENNY AGUTTER and LUCIEN JOHN. (95 min.).
ANGELL HALL $1.50 7:00 & 9:00

I

Women's Career Fair

Friday: BRINGING UP BABY

Kathleen Dannemiller, assistant to the vice-president for student services at the University, talks with Carol Dick and
Lucy Abramson at a Women's Career Fair workshop entitled "if I Am Doing So Well ... Why Am I Feeling So Bad."
The fair, held in the Modern Languages Building, included workshops on general subjects such as "Interviewing
Assertively," and specific topics relating to career fields.

Motiveless murders

SUNDAY

FILMS
Washtenaw County Parks and Recreation-Bighorn, Greenhouse, 10
a.m., Recreation Center at Washtenaw and Hogbeck.
a Cinema Two-Walkabout, 7, 9 p.m., Aud. A, Angell Hall.
Cinema Guild-Tliroshima Mon Amour, 7,9:05 p.m. Old Arch. Aud.
SPEAKERS
Dharma Study Group-Seminar, 8:30 a.m., Room E, Michigan League,
call 665-4481 for info.
Hillel-Raul Hilberg, "The Final Solution," 2 p.m., Rackham Am-
phitheatre.
PERFORMANCES
Ann Arbor Chamber Orchestra-featuring Aaron Copland's "Appalachian
' Spring," 3 p.m., Michigan Theatre.
Hillel - dance performance, "Personal and Artistic Responses to the
Holocaust," 7:15 p.m., Pendleton Rm., Union.
Ethnic Theatre Festival-Echo Hawk Indian Theatre Company, "Coycote
in the Land of Enchantment," children's play, 2 p.m., Mendelssohn Theatre.
Ethnic Theatre Festival-Echo Hawk Indian Theatre Company, "Firelife
' and Legends,"8 p.m., Mendelssohn Theatre.
MEETINGS
A,
Graduate Women's Network-pot luck brunch, 12 noon, Guild House, 802
Monroe.
Gay discussion group-Gay health issues, 6:30 p.m., Guild House, 802
Monroe.
Hiking Club-meet at 1:30 p.m., Rackham N.W. entry on E. Huron.
s n-s
MISCELLANEOUS
School of Metaphysics-Seminar entitled, "Abundance: Your Inheritan-
ce,"9:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Miller Manor, 727 Miller.
4 International Center-Maple Sugar Tasting Bee, day-long trip, Chippewa
Nature Center, Sign up, Rm. 18, Int'l Ctr.
Hillel-Israeli dancing, 1 p.m.; Deli, 6 p.m., 1429 Hill St.
MONDAY
FILMS
Wesley Found-Hiroshima-Nagasaki, Pine Rm., 602 E. Huron, 12:10p.m.
Cinema Guild-Polish Film Series: Man of Marble, 7 p.m., Nights and
Days, 9:05 p.m., Old Arch. Aud.
AAFA-Scarlet Street, 7 p.m., Beyond a Reasonable Doubt, 9 p.m., Aud.
A, Angell.
PIRGIM-Union Maids, Emerging Woman, Antonia, Kuenzel Rm., Union,
7 p.m.
Arbor Alliance-The Other Way, 2235.Angell, 7:30 p.m.
SPEAKERS
Pub. Health Stud. Assoc.-"Primary Health Care in Rural Tanzania,"
M112, SPH II, noon.
Ctr. for Near Eastern and N. African Stud.-Joel Beinin, "The Emergence
of the Egyptian Working Class," Lane Hall Commons Rm., noon.
Applied Mechanics-Walter Debler, "Interferometric Observations of
Stratified'Flows," 219 W. Engin, 4 p.m.
Symposium in Critical Theory-Murray Krieger, ''Literary Criticism: A
Primary or Secondary Art?" Rackham Ampitheater, 4 p.m.
St. Mary's Student Chapel-Marc Mauer, "Alternatives to Lockup,"
Gabriel Richard Ctr. Lounge, 7 p.m.
Hillel-Lawrence L. Langer, "Versions of Survival: The Psychology of

worry Lon
LONDON (AP) - The brutal but ap-
parently motiveless slaying of a crip-
pled, 87-year-old woman has provoked
police fears that a "killing-for-kicks"
trend has begun in normally peaceful
London.
Detectives said the city's historically
low homicide rate has been going up the
past few years and so have incidents of
brutal assaults. Often, authorities said,
the crimes have been committed for
small sums of money - or nothing at
all.
THERE WERE 179 homicides in
London in 1979 compared with 118 the.
year before, Scotland Yard reported.
And although that represents a tiny
fraction of the number of killings in
similarly sized cities like New York,
police here are worried. New York had
1,733 homicides last year, a police
spokesperson there said.
"We could be seeing the start of

don police
something very unpleasant - violence
for kicks and even killing for kicks,"
said a London detective investigating
the death of Jose Shattock, the 87-year-
old widow whose fully clothed body was
found dumped in a water-filled tub.
"It was an apparently motiveless and
vicious crime - yet another brutal at-
tack on a defenseless old lady," said
Chief of Detectives Mike Huins.
LAST CHRISTMAS Day, an 86-year-
old woman was beaten up in her home
in East London and died from a frac-
tured skull. On Jan. 9, a 53-year-old
woman was found strangled and
mutilated in her apartment in south-
west London.
A 62-year-old woman was stabbed to
death in her south London apartment on
Feb. 13.
Police arrested a man after the
killing Feb. 13, but he has not been
charged.

a1
The University of Michigan
College of Literature, Science, and the Arts
Third Distinguished Senior Faculty Lecture Series
Professor Emeritus Gerald Else
in a three-part series, will discuss
The Humanities, Past,
Present, and Future
March31, 1980 The Humanities That Were
April 2, 1980 The Humanities That Are.
April 4,1980 The Humanities That May Be
A reception in Rackham Assembly Hall will follow the final lecture

R.N. PROGRAM
A CAREER IN NURSING
MERCY SCHOOL OF NURSING OF DETROIT is a TWO YEAR
hospital based diploma program to be a REGISTERED NURSE.
Direct patient care experience begins early and continues
until graduation.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: Highschool graduation with a C-plus average,
Biology, Chemistry and 2 years of Math.
First year at Samaritan Health Center-St. Joseph Mercy Hospital Unit, Detroit.
Second year at St. Joseph Mercy Hospital, Ann Arbor and/or Pontiac.
Student residences available. Student parking provided for commuter
students.
FOR FURTIjERINFORMATION CALL 923-5700 EXT. 376
A Glimpse Into Darkness
CONFERENCE ON THE HOLOCAUST
March 23, 24, 25
Sunday, March 23
Raiul Hilberg: "The Final Solution" Keynote Address
2:00 P.M. Rackham Amphitheatre
Personal and Artistic Responses to the Holocaust
Dance Performance
Workshops: Faith After the Holocaust
Children of Survivors
Experiences in Nazi-Occupied Poland
Personal Accounts of Survivors
7:15 P.M. Pendleton Room Union
Monday, March 24
Lawrence L. Langer: "Versions of Survival:
The Psychology of Victim Response"
7:30 P.M. Rackham Amphitheatre
Tuesday, March 25
Carol Rittner, R.S.M.
"The Holocaust: Humanity's Shame"
7:30 P.M. Rackham Amphitheatre
r
Sponsored by: Vice-President for Academic Affair's, College of
Literature, Science and the Arts Student Government, B'nai
B'rith Hillel Foundation, Office of Ethics and Religion, Lord
of Light Lutheran Church, Temple Israel, Congregation Beth
Achim, St. Mary's Chapel, Congregation Shaarey Zedek.

Rackham Amphitheatre - 8:00 p.m.
All lectures are open to the public

, SiTY pp
i
s
i r
®1$1T

J

l.

ti- ._.-i

Print or Type legibly in
MOVING OUT? the space provided,
the copy as you would
Why Not Sublet Your Leaseleta
Through
3rdiigan ublet r
aigUpplemtent r tnhse
NAME __ _s___e_______o4/
A D D RESS ______/
PHONE __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
Mail or Bring in Person with payment to:
420 MAYNARD STREET Lo
AAAVL rLWu WVe DA VAIF T TH r MICIG ANDAILY I nA po

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan