100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 23, 1980 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-03-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 2-Sunday; March 23, 1980-The Michigan Daily
Carter says shah won't be admitted to U.S.

(Continued ,com Page )
Americans captive. The militants have
been demanding the return of the shah
for trial in exchange for release of the
hostages:
The former monarch, who is 61, is
understood to be facing surgery for an
enlarged and cancerous spleen.
Although officials had said the
operation was delayed last weekend so
he could build up his strength, ther;
have been reports of a dispute over who
would perform the surgery.
Authorities in Panama City said the
shah, Mohammad Reza Pahlavi,
refused to let Panamanian doctors
operate on him and the government

refused to allow Houston, Texas heart
'specialist Michael DeBakey perform
the operation.
PRESIDENT Carter's staff chief,
Hamilton Jordan, has been in Panama
attempting to mediate the dispute that
has delayed the surgery.
It was understood that Carter and his
National Security Council discussed the
situation yesterday during a lengthy,
informal meeting at the Camp David,
Md., presidential retreat.
Deputy Press Secretary Rex Granum
told reporters in Washington the entire
membership of the NSC and its top staff
were present-Vice President Walter
Mondale, Secretary of State Cyrus

CINEMA GUILD
PRESENTS
HIROSHIMA MON AMOUR
(ALAIN RESNAIS, 1958)
C'est un film d'amour est de ta bombe atomique. Ou est la
plume de ma tante? En francais avec les sous-titres en
- englais. In the best "warm misty" manner of Resnais.
7:00 & 9:05 $1.50 Old A&D

Vance, Defense Secretary Harold
Brown, Gen. David Jones, who chairs
the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Intelligence
Director Stansfield Turner; National
Security adviser Zbigniew Brzezinski
and White House news secretary Jody
Powell.
THE MEETING, which took place
ain Aspen Lodge at Camp David, lasted
from 10:30 a.m. EST until 4 p.m and
included a working lunch of soup and
sandwiches.
Cranum refused to discuss the
activities of White House chief of staff
Hamilton Jordan, who flew to Panama
Friday to help work out the details on
medical care for the shah.
In Panama City, Christian Bourget,
an attorney representing Iran's
revolutionary regime, said, yesterday
he would file 450 pages of evidence
detailing the deposed shah's alleged
crimes and press for the extradition of
the former monarch from Panama.
WHILE IN the United States last fall,
the shah underwent surgery to remove
his gall bladder and received cancer
treatment in New York.
Since leaving the United States, the
Pahlavi and his wife have been living
on Contadora Island, 35 miles southeast
o Panama City.
Pahlavi fled Tehran more than a year
ago during the Islamic revolution led by
Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini.
Meanwhile, in Iran, Foreign Minister
The biggest block of cheese ever
made was a 17-ton cheddar. It was
produced by Wisconsin cheese makers
and shown at the 1964 New York
World's Fair. It used 170,000 quarts of
milk-43 years' worth from the average
cow.

Sadegh Gotbzadeh charged yesterday
that Henry Kissinger was trying to help
the deposed shah escape extradition by
moving frokm Panama-a move
Ghotbzadehsaid would delay freeing
the American hostages in Tehran.
Ghotbzadeh, in a statement released
in Tehran, said the alleged attempt by
the former U.S. secretary of state and
David Rockefeller, chairman of the
Chase Manhattan Bank, to move ousted
Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi would
have "a disastrous effect."
Neither Kissinger nor Rockefeller
could be reached for comment.
D.C. protest
draws
thousands
(Continued from Page 1)
will have an effect," he said, "but it's
pretty impressive."
Many of the protesters planned to
stay a few extra days to lobby members
of Congress who they hope will vote
against the bill to provide funds for
registration. About fifty members of
the University of Michigan's group plan
to participate in the lobbying effort.
The demonstration was peaceful ex-
cept for a few instances when pro-draft
people tried to climb onto the speakers'
platform at the Capitol. These attempts
were halted by rally marshalls, and the
people were taken away with the aid of
police.

Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports

n

6

(A~

4$

mom tm

U

B8

-,-O
\
- -

P'ASSO VER IS COMING
Worried about Passover??!!
Come join our communal sedar in a warm,
joyous, Chassidic atmosphere. With illustra-
tions, explanations and insights into the
HAGADA-Story of Passover-Plus a Deli-
cious Festive Meal.

P
A
S

Shell oil requests drilling
site near Pigeon River
LANSING-The had of the state Department of Natural Resources is
expected to begin a review this week of a Shell Oil Co. request for permission
to drill a new well in the Pigeon River Country State Forest.
In asking for the right to drill the new well site, Shell argued the site was
owned by a man whose property sat above a pool of oil being drained by
wells drilled by other oil companies on land just outside the forest's boun-
dary.
NRC to be reorganized
WASHINGTON-The administration announced yesterday a proposed
reorganization of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, giving its chairman
more direct control over staff and management in emergency situations.
The "Kemeny Commission," appointed by Carter in the wake of last
year's Three Mile Island nuclear power plant accident, and the "Rogovin
team," hired by the NRC itself, both recommended replacing the five-
member NRC with a single administrator to strengthen its ability to
regulate the nuclear industry.
Paper mill fireekills seven
COVINGTON, Va.-Seven persons were killed and seven more injured
when a 100-foot fiberglass storage tower erupted into flames at a paper mill
yesterday.
The victims were employees of the International Reinforce Plastic Co.,
a South Carolina contractor. They were relining the inside of the storage
tower in the plant's, bleaching division when the incident occurred. The
seven persons were injured trying to put out the flames.
Andy Dreszer, spoksman for the Westvaco Co., owners of the mill, said
the cause of the flames was as yet unknown.
Cleveland school board to.
go ahead with desegregation
CLEVELAND-Despite busing foulups, the Cleveland school board
voted yesterday to go ahead with the desegregation of 22,700 junior high
school students tomorrow.
Under an already-delayed timetable, tomorrow is the day junior high
school students are to report to new assignments, including 11,300 blacks and
whites who will ride buses to class. About 6,000 other studens will also board
buses to continue the desegregation that began last fall.
The desegragation of 19 junior high schools began Wednesday with the
busing of seventh graders while eighth and ninth graders stayed home.
Eighth graders were bused on Thursday, and ninth grades on Friday while
the others stayed home. The slow phase-in was designed to give the district
time to straighten out problems, but the troubles became worse each day.
School officials admitted there was a risk of continued mechanical
breakdowns of buses and driver shortages, but recommended against
putting off the integration.
Report finds equal pay for
equal work uneconomical
WASHINGTON-An economics professor from UCLA predicted yes-
terday that giving females equal pay for comparable work performed by
men would be eostly and result in many women losing jobs.
In a report published by the University of Miami Law and Economics
Center, Dr. Cotton Mather Lindsay predicted "wage increases in
occupations now filled by women will raise the cost of labor above its
marginal revenue product."
The AFL-CIO, at its November convention, adopted a resolution
supporting the "comparable pay" concept and encouraging re-evaluation of
jobs held mainly by women according to their real worth.
Lindsay said'all market conditions must be completely comparable to
justify equalizing earnings in two occupations, and the effect of ability on
wages is not as obvious as it may seem.
Firefighters' strike settled
KANSAS CITY, Mo.-A strike by narly 900 firefighters ended late last
night after an agreement was reached to reinstate 42 dismissed firefighters.
"Basically, the new agreement is the same as the old one, the only
difference is the reinstatement," City Manager Robert Kippsaid.
"Kansas City was on the brink of disaster," Missouri Governor Joseph
Teasdale said. The city has seen a rash of fires, including 30 confirmed cases
of arson in the past six days, since the firefighters walked off their jobs.

A

U

Don't be left out in
the co0ld
. Consider C0ops
STUDENT COOPERATIVE HOUSING
ON NORTH AND CENTRAL CAMPUS
FALL OPENINGS Inter-Cooperative Council
APPLY NO W4002 MICHIGAN UNION, BOX 66 PH, 662-4414

ALL THIS AT:
8ND
CHAGAD HUSE
715H ILLSTREET
Dates: Men. March 31slnd
rues. April 1 at 8:30 pm
CALL NOW FOR RESERVATIONS
663-7597 or 995-3276
$8.50 per Sedar
Also during Passover we will be having
a full menu for lunch and dinner at
Kosher Korner Restaurant.
Rebate for Dorm Students

G
tot

, 1
J
in rni

V

Rol

1%

f:1.

Oar
a c7 '4
p6-4
O.a c

AT rTHE
WE
COVER
EVERYTHIINGO4

1
t
i
I
t
_ J_ i
r
.
l
e
'
yr
1
r
.-j i }
r
r.. s
. > '
f " '' F
V
'
r l

a
I-

w1

GlOMtt iantil
(USPS 344-900)
Volume XC, No. 136
Sunday, March 23, 1980
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109.
Subscription rates: $12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail
outside Ann Arbor; Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday
mornings. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7 by mail outside Ann
Arbor. Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109.
The Michigan Daily is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to United Press International,
Pacific News Service, Los Angeles Times Syndicate, and Field Newspapet Syndicate.
News room: (313) 764-0552, 76-DAILY: Sports desk: 764-0562; Circulation: 764-0558; Classified advertising:
764-0557; Display advertising: 764-0554; Billing: 764-0550: Composing Room: 764-0556.

Iq

..

C
),

Editor-in-Chief..-......-............MARK PARRENT
Managing Editor.................MITCH CANTOR
City Editor..-...-..................PATRICIA HAGEN
University Editor...................TOMAS MIRGA
Editorial Page Editors-.......,-......JOSHUA PECK
HOWARD WITT
Magazine Editors..-..............ELISA ISAACSON
R.J. SMITH
Arts Editors....................MARKCOLEMAN
DENNIS HARVEY
Sports Editor...............A. . ..... ALA FANGER
Executive Sports Editors.....,......... ELISA FRYE
GARY LEVY
SCOTT LEWIS

Business Manager..,......ROSEMARY WICKOWSKI
Sales Manager....................DANIEL WOODS
Operations Manager.......-.... KATHLEEN CULVER
Display Manager...............KRISTINA PETERSON
Classified Manager..................SUSAN KLING
Nationals Manager ...........ROBERT THOMPSON
Finance Manager ......... ....... GREGG HADDAD
Circulation Manager... . ............ JAMES PICKETT
Ad Coordinator.....................PETE PETERSEN
BUSINESS STAFF: Patricia Barron, Maxwell Benoliel
Joseph Broda, Courtney Casteel, Randi Cigelinkc-
Dona Drebin. Aida Eisenstat, Martin Feldman, Bar-
bara Forsiund, Alisso Goldfaden, Jeffrey Gotheim.

i

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan