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March 20, 1980 - Image 3

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-03-20

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AATA to study 'U' bus needs

The Michigan Daily-Thursday, March 20, 1980-Page 3
Taiwanese dissident tells
court of gov 't. torture

By LEE KATTERMAN
The Ann Arbor Transportation
Authority (AATA) decided last night to
udy the University's bus system
fore sponsoring a $3 million Univer-
city grant application for new vehicles.
i The University can only receive
federal and state transportation funds
by applying through AATA, the
designated recipient of these monies in
the Ann Arbor-Ypsilanti urban area.
The University and AATA have been
discussing a grant application to the
Jrban Mass Transit Authority (UMTA)
Ior replacement of old buses during the
past four years, according to Harlan
Mulder, assistant to University Vice-
President and Chief Financial Officer
James Brinkerhoff. ,
AATA Board Chairman Cecil Ur-
sprung said Tuesday the study was
'needed to ensure that the University
:request would not jeopardize sub-

sequent AATA funds requests to meet
city needs.
"If the University's request is gran-
ted," said Ursprung, "AATA might not
get their needs met."
Mulder said the University has in-
dicated its full support for such a study.
He has also encouraged the AATA
board to move as rapidly as possible to
complete the study and reach a decision
on the University's request.
In other action, AATA Executive
Director Richard Simonetta outlined a
study of employee absenteeism recen-
tly completed by his staff.
When figures on AATA employee ab-
sences were compared to data obtained
from the Employers Association of
Detroit, Simonetta reported that AATA
employees were absent three times
more often than the average non-

manufacturing employee nationwide.
Simonetta emphasized that the
majority of AATA employees had good
attendance records. The problem is
with a small number of employees with
more than 50 days of sick leave, he said.
Simonetta said the problem was caused
partly by a too-lenient attendance
policy. AATA Manager of Human
Resources Robert Potts reported that
in 1979 there were no discharges and
one suspension for violations of atten-
dance.
He ,further proposed that a new at-

tendance policy be prepared and im-
plemented on May 1, 1980, along with
other changes in the personal policy
manual.
MUSEUM PUBLISHES
VOLUME ON PAXTON
INDIANAPOLIS (AP)-The In-
dianapolis Museum of Art has
published a comprehensive study of
American artist William McGregor
Paxton (1896-1941), illustrated with 53
full-color plates.

TAIPEI, Taiwan (AP) - Taiwan's
leading feminist cried yesterday at her
court martial trial after testifying that
government investigators forced a con-
fession from her by denying her food
and sleep even though she had been
treated for thyroid cancer.
The woman, Lu Hsiu-lien, and seven
other dissidents are charged with plot-
ting to overthrow the Nationalist
Chinese government. If convicted, they
could be sentenced to death.

Human rights groups, which have
expressed concern about the future of
democracy on Taiwan and about the
government's human rights policies,
view the trial as a key indicator of how
much opposition the government will
tolerate.
Lu, a 35-year-old lawyer, and another
defendant told the panel of five judges
yesterday that they signed confessions
after being subjected to non-stop in-
terrogation for up to 60 hours.

Changes proposed
for LSA counseling

FILMS

Public Health-Noontime Film Fest, HMOs: Prescription for Change,
HMOs: A Closer Look, HMOs: A Worker's View, Aud., SPH II, 12:10 p.m.
Marketing Club/MSA-Film of the 1979 CLIO Awards for advertising:
12:30 p.m., Hale Aud..
Cinema Guild-The Burmese Harp, Old Arch. Aud., 7,9:05 p.m.
Ann Arbor Film Co-op-Citizen Kane, Michigan Theater, 7, 9:30 p.m.
SPEAKERS
Computing Ctr.-Follow-up lab to Forrest Haftman's Mar. 11 lecture on
the Ontel Terminal, NUBS, 9-10:15 a.m., 10:30-noon. Call764-9595 to register.
CEW-Susan Harding, reviewing Phyllis Schlafly's Power of the Positive
Woman and Jo. Freeman's The Women's Liberation Movement, E. Conf.
Rm., Rackham, noon.
Resource Pol. & Mgmt. Prog.-Wes Vivian, "Implementation of the
USEPA's Air Pollution Offset Policy and its Energy Implications," 1028
SDana, noon.
4 Ctr. for Afroamerican & African Students-panel discussion, "The
Oganization and Significance of BAM," Schorling Aud., Sch. of Ed., 1:30
Sp.m.
Women's Studies-Lecture and slide show by Annis Pratt, "Women's Ar-
chetypes and Women's Studies," 3-5 p.m., W. Conference Rm., Rackham.
9 Ctr. for Afroamerican & African Studies-panel discussion, "Perspectives
on BAM from the University Community," Schorling Aud., Sch. of Ed., 3:45
p.m.
Chemistry-Michael Rothman, "Computational Chemistry and Molecular
Structure," 1200 Chem., 4 p.m.
J HispanioAnerian: Lecture Series-Jose Carbranes, "The Process of
Decolonizatioitin Puerto Rico," Rackham Amphitheater, 4 p.m.
Ctr. farp. Afroamerican & African Studies-panel discussion, "The
Challenge of BAM for the 1980's," Schorling Aud., Sch. of Ed., 5:30 p.m.
Spartacus Youth League-Helen Kelley, George Crawford, "A Marxist
View: To Defend Worker's 'rights," 7:30 p.m., Multipurpose room, UGLI.
Undergraduate Political Science Associatiop-Husseine Hassouna, Egyp-
tian embassy, "Egypt and the Middle East," 7 p.m., 100 Hutchins Hall.
Spartacus Youth League-Helen Kelley, George Crawford, "A Marxist
View: To Defend Worker's Rights," 7:30 p.m., Multipurpose Room, UGLI.
Interfaith Council for Peace-Barbara Fuller, "Vietnam and Kam-
puchea: The Unfinished Story," 8 p.m., Memorial Christian Church, Hill and.
Tappan.
MEETINGS
Poli. Sci. Dept.-Concentrator's meeting, 4-6 p.m., Lec. Hall II; MLB.
Michigan Students for Anderson-8 p.m., ASud. C, Angell Hall.
PERFORMANCES
Studio Theatre Series-"The Inteview," by Peter Snett, 4:30 p.m., Arena
Theatre,, Frieze Bldg.
Ypsilanti Community Band-concert, auditorium, Ypsilanti central
Community Building, 210 W. Cross, 7:30 p.m.
Guild House-poetry series, Lynn Coffin, Joseph Brodsky, 802 Monroe,
7:30 p.m.
Soundstage Coffee House-Jazz band "Astralight," University Club,
Michigan Union, 8-12 p.m.
School of Music-U-M Concert Band and Chamber Winds, 8 p.m., Hill.
PTP-"St. Mark's Gospel,"8 p.m., Power Center.
Canterbury Loft-"The Anita Bryant Follies," 8 p.m., Canterbury Loft,
332S. State.
Ark-Joe & Antoinette McKenna, Irish pipes, harp, singing, 1421 Hill, 9
p.m.
EXHIBITS'
Museum of Art-"American Photographs: Gifts from the collection of
Marvin Feldheim," and "Fifteen Photographs: A Purchase Exhibition," 9
a~m.-5 p.m.
SSlusser Gallery-"Six B.F. Eggs," exhibition of sculpture, ceramics,
metal work and paintings by University Students, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Clements Library-"Childhood in Early America," 9 a.m.-noon, 1-5 p.m.
Exhibit Museum-"Indians of the Great Lakes Region," 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Pendleton Arts Center-paintings by John Guthrie, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Union Art Gallery-"Group exhibition of graduates from the U-M MFA
program in ceramics," 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Rare Book Room-"French Illustrated Books of the Eighteenth Century,"
Matthaei Botanical Gardens-"Friendship through Flowers," Japanese
Flower Arrangements, 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Stearns Collection-Musical Instruments, 1-4:30 p.m.
MISCELLANEOUS
Alpha Phi Omega-Student Blood Drive, 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Union.
Washtenaw County Coordinating Councilfor Children at Risk-brown bag
*, __ -, _ar! D]I -C.. nn fl..443_ «......r m

By DAVID MEYER
A proposed overhaul of the Univer-
sity's academic counseling program
might require next year's LSA fresh-
persons to meet with an assigned
academic counselor before electing
courses at CRISP, LSA-Student Gover-
nment (LSA-SG) was informed yester-
day.
Mitch Mondry, LSA-SG member and
a student representative on the LSA
Administrative Board which is spon-
soring the proposal, said he will seek
LSA-SG's endorsement for the proposal
in their meeting next Wednesday.
MONDRY SAID the proposal, which
must be approved by the University's
Executive Committee before taking ef-
fect, also changes the focus of
academic counseling. He said required
counseling might force incoming fresh-
persons to more closely consider their
educational objectives and more
carefully select their courses to meet
those goals.
The Administrative Board, c9m-
prised of both student and faculty

members, will finalize its proposal in
its meeting next week before seeking
LSA-SG's endorsement and presenting
it to the Executive Committee.
In other action, LSA-SG appointed
William Ling to the Michigan Student
Assembly (MSA) to fill a vacancy
caused by the resignation of Scott
Kelly. Ling will serve on the Assembly
for the remaining four meetings until
the MSA elections when a replacement
can be elected.
LSA-SG DECIDED to appoint Ling,
who had been interviewed in the past
for previous MSA seat vacancies,
rather than council member J. P.
Adams, who had been MSA's choice to
fill the Vacant seat. Most council mem-
bers, however, led by LSA-SG
President Dan Solomon, argued that
the vacancy should be filled by a
student who had undergone the stan-
dard interviewing process. Because the
vacancy needs to be filled by Tuesday,
council members felt there would not
be enough time to conduct further in-
terviews.

INTERVIWS FOR STAFF POSITIONS
AT
NEW CAMP FARBAND
"A CAMP THAT BUILDS MENCHEN"
This is the NEW CAMP 120 Acres of rolling, wood-
FARBAND - a ed hills, surround-
Jewish camp for ed by thousands of
the 80's; scenically acres of state land
located in the beau- and dozens of clear
tiful Waterloo Rec- beautiful lakes.
reation area, on
Our facilities are second to none-riding, sailing, sports, new waterfront,
woodlore, camping, canoeing, and wilderness experience. At camp Ve learn
about our Jewish heritage by studying religion, history, and culture.
HIGH PAYING SUMMER JOBS WITH A PROFESSIONAL
STAFF TO PROVIDE TRAINING.
For interviews starting Monday, March 24
call 764-7456 or 663-4471

KEN GOLDSMITH, M.D.
Executive Director

GARY BASS, Ph.D.
Interviewer

E.

Ill. Attorney General
guilty of tax evasion

MEMOREX MM .
90-Minute Cassette
Buy two-
Get one Free! H
MEMOFA
Al* ..
MEMOREX Recoring Tape

CHICAGO (AP) - Illinois Attorney
General William Scott was convicted of
income tax fraud yesterday by a
federal jury that deliberated 461/2 hours
after a one-week trial.
Scott, in his fourth term as the state's
chief legal officer was found guilty on
one count and innocent of four others by
a jury of ten men and two women.
THE VERDICT was read by U.S.
District Judge John Powers Crowley as
Scott sat listening in the packed cour-
troom.
Scott, who was upset Tuesday in the
Illinois Republican primary for the U.S.
Senate, was charged with five counts of
underreporting his income from 1972 to
1975.
The jurors began their deliberations
Friday.
Conviction on all five counts would
have carried a maximum sentence of 15
years imprisonment and fines of up to
$25,000. He was accused of converting
campaign contributions for personal
use and failing to report them on his in-
come tax returns.
CROWLEY PERMITTED the jurors
to work at their own pace and allowed.
them to continue deliberating as long as
they did not indicate they were
deadlocked.
The longest deliberation in a federal
court in Illinois was in 1966 when a jury
took 47 hours and five minutes to acquit
four men and a research foundation of
NEW CASTS
TOLEDO, Ohio (AP)-Some ortho-
pedic patients are finding the weight
being lifted from their shoulders, arms,
legs, or any other area that is set in a
cast.
Plaster is often being replaced with
lightweight, high-strength glass fiber
casts-recently cited by the American
Hospital Associaiton as being among
today's top 10 advances in hospital
care.
Owens-Corning Fiberglas Corp., a
supplier of the glass fiber filament for
the casts, says the material is two or
three times stronger and one-half to
one-third the weight of plaster, allowing
greater comfort and mobility.
ANDT

mail fraud and conspiracy in the
Krebiozen cancer drug trial.
Scott, 53, who was beaten in the
primary voting by Lt. Gov, David
O'Neal, had been elected attorney
general four times and state treasurer
once by whopping margins.
Scott had done little campaigning,
since the trial began Jan. 8 and .has
vowed to appeal any adverse verdict. In
an attempt to receive a verdict before
Tuesday's primary vote, Scott
refrained from testifying in his own
defense or calling on what he said was a
long list of politicians and officials to
testify in his behalf.
If the conviction is upheld, Scott could
be stripped of his state office.

L.:

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"""APPLY NOW:
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