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March 14, 1980 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-03-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

r
SLocal
By FRED FIEBER
Rows of corn replaced with rows of
houses? It's possible that Washtenaw
Oounty's farmland could be Cifified by
the year 2012 if present trends continue,
cording to a County study.
According to the 1974 U.S.
IDepartment of Agriculture census, and
g~ill Ames, agricuitural agent with the
Nashtenaw Cooperative Extension
Service, this areas is composed of 1,327
farms taht include about 226,000
acres-half Ithe county's land. Ames
said that the farms are about evenly
divided between dairy products,
gvestock and crops. The average farm
ize is 170 acres.
"Several factors are causing loss of
farmland in the county," said Ken
' udwig, agricultural assistant for
Washtenaw County. "Part of it is a
reflection of post World War II
phenomena; highway construction,
commercial endeavors, and
subdivision."
"THERE IS ALSO speculative
pressure from people in city zones
anticipating growth. Called
napfrogging, Washtenaw County is
feeling this effect from both Detroit and

The Michigan Daily-Friday, March 14, 1980-Page 3
farms gone by 2012?

THE HEBREW UNIVERSITY
OF JERUSALEM
1980/81 PROGRAM'S FOR AMERICAN STUDENTS

Ann Arbor," he said.
Ludwig won't classify the trend as
good or bad, but says he feels it
important for people to live up to their
standards.
S"We need farmland as a visual space.
It's the psychological appeal. I would
like to see people able to live together in
existing cities and suburbs, utilizing
improvements already there, and leave
open spaces for farms," he said.
Tom Bloomer, a county farmer who
owns 1,060 acres, feels the trend is bad.
"It's not that I object to people living in
the country. I just think we need a little
more forethought and planning. We
have county land bad for farming that
would be appropriate to build on,
though it is easier to build on
farmland."
"MUCH OF IT seems like such a
waste," Bloomer continued. "I have
neighbors here who commute to work in
Dearborn every day. I don't see how
they can afford the gas."
"City people often come-to the
country to search for neighbors,"
Ludwig said. "I guess it's some sort of
romantic myth."
According to Ludwig, county farms

produce goods worth about $40 million a
year, approximately one-tenth of what
the University generates. "Our
production may not be huge, but we
have a nice blend of rural and urban life
here. People are attracted to this, but
it's this.attraction that's causing farms
to disappear," he said.
Ludwig also said that land, which he
calls a resource, is being treated as a
commodity. "Farmers are being outbid
by companies for land. Farm
equipment costs are enormous. It's
these high barriers that are preventing
prospective farmers from coming
here. "
"We need to think about land in terms
of milinnia, not just the next twenty
minutes," Ludwig said. "I know one

farmer who's made plans for his farm
for the next 100 years."
On March 1, disappearance of county
farmland was discussed by
approximately 125 people, mostly
farmers, at the Washtenaw
Agricultural Lands Conference at
Saline High School. "These people
showed genuine concern for their
community," said Ludwig. "They
wanted to know what they could do to
help the farm community here."
The Washtenaw Cooperative
Extension Service is now compiling a
report of the conference. "When we
finish it, we'll send the first copy to
President Carter. We think it's
important for him to know what's going
on here and how we feel about the
country," Ludwig said.

E ONE YEAR PROGRAM-for
college sophomores and
juniors!
Q REGULAR STUDIES-for
college transfer students
toward B.A. and B.Sc. degrees.
PLEASE CHECK DESIRE

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given in English.
D PROGRAM a

For Application and Information, write: 45
Office of Academic Affairs
American Friends of the Hebrew University
1140 Avenueof the Americas, New York, NY 10036 (212) 840-5820
Name
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No prosecution of
5 gridders planned

celebration recalls
Fletcher prohibition raid

By MAURA CARRY
Fletcher Hall has stood quietly
among other homes on Sybil Street for
more than half a century, but few
students know where or what it is. The
all-male dormitory across from the In-
tramural Building held an anniversary
celebration last night, in hopes of in-
creasing the University community's
awareness of its existence.
The celebration, attended by Univer-
city President Harold Shapiro, his wife
ivian, and several housing ad-
inistrators, commemorated the day,
50 years ago, that Fletcher Hall was
raided by the Ann Arbor police for
dlistributing illegal liquor during
prohibition.
"That was the first time Fletcher had
any recognition," said Resident Direc-
tor Michael Rupert in an after-dinner
speech.
TODAY THE staff and the residents
4are trying to get recognition for Flet-
her again. "We had a bad reputation
four or five years ago but this year
(Fletcher has) become known as a
respectable place," said Robert Gazall,
,president of the hall.
r Fletcher is different from most other
diorms. It is the only all-male dorm on
campus, and one of the few that attrac-
ts primarily upperclassmen - about 70
per cent are juniors and seniors this
,year. Rupert explained that Fletcher's
location is quiet and makes studying
*asier.
SJunior Tom Smith has lived in Flet-
' i'... ; . :_ .''.". .....*..."..:.i:: rv~i<t:3.* ";'s.*. *.* . .:e;.

cher for three years and says that the
atmosphere is different - less wild
than other dorms. "It's not as rowdy -
more mature," he said. He added that
for that reason there are few fights and
very few vandalism or theft problems,
even though residents, who do not
receive meals, keep all their food
together in the same refrigerators.
SMITH SAID Fletcher was like a
fraternity in some respects, but- that
"you have to keep up an image in a frat,
and do things even if you don't want to.
Here, you don't."
Gazall said that the difference bet-
ween Fletcher and other halls was that
Fletcher is more like a home. "You
make a lot of deep friendships - all in
all, it's a great place to live," he said.
He said that many people stay several
years, even as many as six.
Karl Hamilton was placed in Fletcher
as a freshman. He ended up staying
four years. "I don't think I'd want to
live in a co-ed dorm," he said, adding
that he needs a chance to get away from
everything, and Fletcher was a good
place.
Fletcher residents enjoy among the
lowest housing rates near campus - 94
dollars a month for a single room or a
two-room triple, along with free
parking and any-time use of the
refrigerators, freezers, and a
microwave oven. Central Campus is a
two-minute walk away.

By ALISON HIRSCHEL
The five Unviersity football
players suspended earlier this week
for alleged drug involvement will
probably not be investigated by local
police or federal officials.
When asked if the Ann Arbor
Police Department was planning to
investigate the drug-related
suspensions of players B.J. Dickey,
Mike Kligis, Dan Kwiatkowski, Ben
Needham, or Brian Virgil, Ann
Arbor Police Detective William
Canada said, "Why should we? We
have no idea what's going on."
Canada refused any further
comment.
WASHTENAW COUNTY Sheriff
Thomas Minick also claimed he
knew nothing about the incident.

"It's not our jurisdiction, anyway,"
he said, adding that problems within
Ann Arbor city limits are usually
handled by the Ann Arbor Police
Department. Minick admitted he
was not sure where the alleged
actions took place.
A spokeswoman for the Ann Arbor
office of the Federal Bureau of
Investigation said they were not
working on the case, and had no
interest in it.
Theodore Vernier, the Director of
the Detroit office of the Drug
Enforcement Administration
(DEA) commented, "Assuming
there was specific evidence of
trafficking brought to us by a
competent person, then, and only
then, would we take action."

BE1 ISMSI
Presents
Thorkild Jacobsen
Professor Emeritus of Assyriology, Harvard University
ZWERDLING LECTURES
Friday, March 14-8:30 P.M.
"THE ERIDU GENESIS"
Saturday,March 15-11:15 A.M.
(During Services)
"THE BEGINNINGS OF
PERSONAL RELIGION'

2000 Wstenaw
ALL WELCOME

9

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FILMS

School of Public Health-Noontime Film Fest, A Dose of Reality,
Hospice, 12:10 p.m., School of Public Health Aud. II.
Ann Arbor Film Co-op-When Dinosaurs Ruled the Earth, 7 p.m.,
Bucket of Blood, 8:45 p.m., Modern Languages Building Aud. 4.
Cinema Two-Lost Horizon, 7, 9 p.m., Angell Hall Aud. A.
Germanic Languages and Literature-Dirmentradodie, 7 p.m., MLB
Lecture Room 1.
Cinema Guild-18th Ann, Arbor 16mm Film Festival, 7, 9, 11 p.m.,
Michigan Theater.
Gargoyle Films-The Hustler, 7:07, 9:39 p.m., 100 Hutchins Hall.
AstroFest-The Land, 7:30 p.m., MLB Aud. 3.
Mediatrics-Brewster McCloud, 7 p.m., McCabe and Mrs. Miller, 9:15
p.m., Natural Science Aud.
Women in 'Action-Desproses, Greta's Girls, and Lunatune, 8 p.m., St.
Andrew's Church, 306 N. Division.
a SPEAKERS
Dept. of Industrial and Operations Eng.-Robert Smith, "Turnpike
Results for Single Location Capacity Expansion," 9 a.m., 206 W.
Engineering.
Center for South and Southeast Asian Studies-Nesha Haniff,
"Stereotypes of Muslim Women in India," noon, Lane Hall Commons Room.
College of Nuclear Engineering-Terry Kammash, "Present States of
Magnetic Fusion Research," 3:45 p.m., Cooley Building.
Graduate Students in Musicology-Charles Atkinson, "Parapteres:
Nothi or not-Medieval Music and Theory," 4 p.m., Cady Room, Stearns
Building.
PIRGIM-Rep. Gary Owens, "Legistlative Processes," 7 p.m.,
Michigan Union Conf. Rm. 4.
PIRGIM-"Peace and Politics" lectures: Roberta Zinn, "The New Cold
War," Jim Bristol, "The Draft and Conscientous Objection Today," Jim
Dries, "Veterans' Issues," 7:30-10:30 p.m., Rackham Aud.
r
PERFORMANCES
Office of Major Events-Marshall Tucker Band, 8 p.m., Crisler Arena.
School of Music-Piano recital, Amy Finck, 8 p.m., Recital Hall.
Canterbuy Loft-"A Game of Chess,"8 p.m., 332 S. State St.
Ark-Joe Hickerson, singer/folklore archivist, 9 p.m., 1421 Hill.
MISCELLANEOUS
Extension Service-Conference on "Insurance Law in the 80's:
Resolving Dilemmas," 8:45 a.m.-5 p.m., 412 Maynard.
International Center-Trip to Nigerian Art Exhibit at the Detroit Art In-
stiftte10 a m.-4 n m.

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