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March 14, 1980 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1980-03-14

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Page 2-Friday, March 14, 1980-The Michigan Daily
CINEMA
presentsa
LOST HORIZON 04
(FRANK CAPRA, 1937)
A group of survivors of a plane crash in the Himalayas'
discover the lost city of Shangri-la-an idyllic and myster-
ious retreat from the turmoil and strife of the outside
world. An opulent spectacle and the perfect escapist film.
With RONALD COLEMAN, JANE WYATT and SAM JAFFE as
the High Lama.

GOP hopefuls knock
Democrats' deficits

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$1.50

7:00 & 9:00

Tomorrow: CREATURE FROM THE BLACK LAGOON and THE FLY

OUR GUES-Author, Educator, CGreer Consultant
March 17 and 18, 1980
DR. DOROTHY K. BESTOR, Author of Aside From Teach-
ing English, What in The World Can You Po?, is flying in from Seattle,
Washington to offer three special presentations for the University of
Michigan. Make plans today to attend one or more of the following sessions:
Monday, March 17, 1980- 4:00-5:30 p.m.
PRESENTATION: Careers Unlimited: Options for Graduate
Students in Humanities
LOCATION: West Conference Room, Rackhom
Monday, March 17, 1980 -7:30-8:30 p.m.
PRESENTATION: "The Humanities Dilemma: What Can I
Do With A Major In ..?"
LOCATION: Auditorium D, Angell Hall
Tuesday, March 18, 1980-4:00-6:00 p.m.
PRESENTATION: "Teaching-Just One Career for
Teachers?'
LOCATION: Schorling Auditorium, SEB

CHICAGO (AP) - Four Republican
presidential candidates argued last
night about the way to cut the federal
budget and they blamed Democratic
Congresses for running up deficits that
fuel inflation.
This time, in their fifth rhetorical
showdown, they really debated.
"I don't believe in election-year con-
versions," said former California Gov.
Ronald Reagan, questioning whether
President Carter really is devoted to a
balanced budget.
THE REPUBLICANS said they are,
with Reagan, Rep. Philip Crane of
Illinois and former United Nations Am-
bassador George Bush all taking slaps
at liberal Rep. John Anderson.
Anderson accused Bush of
misstatements. "I have to telluhim that
a half-truth is as dangerous and decep-
tive as a lie," he said.
The Illinois congressman said Bush
has deceived voters by accusing him of
advocating cuts in Social Security
benefits. "Now wait a minute, that's not
true," he snapped across the stage at
Bush.
ANDERSON SAID what he proposes
is a slowing in the rate of increase in
those benefits.
The broadside aimed at Anderson
was evidence of his emergence as a real
contender against the dwindling
Republican field in the Illinois
presidential primary election next
Tuesday.
The others criticiied Anderson on
Social Security, on his record of votes
on House appropriations bills, and on

/

n.

Dr. Bestor's campus visit is being sponsored by:
CAREER PLANNING AND PLACEMENT (A unit of the Office of. Student
Services)
DEPARTMENT-OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE, LS&A
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
RACKHAM STUDENT GOVERNMENT

Classes forming
for April 19 and
June 28 LSATs
CALL 1-261-LSAT OR WRITE:
University LSAT Preparation
Service
33900 Schooicraft Road
Suite G-2
Livonia, Michigan 48150

his proposal for a 50-cents-a-gallon
gasoline tax. Anderson advocates the
tax as a conservation measure, with
proceeds to be used to reduce Social
Security taxes by 50 per cent.
There was no panel of questioners to
prompt the candidates in this debate,
and they made a debate of this one.
Their earlier confrontations, in past
primaIy campaign states, had
produced more agreement than
discord.
THREE OF the four - with Anderson
again the exception - had an invitation
for former President Gerald Ford, who
has said he'll decide after the Illinois
primary whether to enter the cam-
paign.
..Come on in, the water's fine, it's
going to be very competitive right down
to Detroit" and the Republican
National Convention," Bush said.
Crane said if Ford wants to run, it's
time for him to join the fray. Reagan
agreed.
"I, for one, would not want to see him
disturb his well-deserved retirement,"
said Anderson.
The 90-minute debate was nationally
televised by the Public Broadcasting
System.
House OKs
windf all tax;
income taxes
could be cut
continued from Page )
President Carter proposed the tax a
year ago after deciding to phase out
federal price controls on U.S. crude oil
in an effort to stimulate domestic
production and cut dependence on im-
ports. Decontrol will let U.S. prices rise
to world levels; the tax will take back a
portion of the increase.
REP. AL ULLMAN, (D-Ore.), head
of the House delegation that helped
produce the compromise bill, hailed it
as "a very equitable solution to a very,
difficult problem - and one that is good
for America."
Rep. Bill Archer, (R-Texas), who led
Republican efforts to send the bill back
to conference, called the bill "a serious
blow to any hope we have of eliminating
energy shortages." He accused his
colleagues of using the tax to punish the
oil industry for government shor-
tcomings on energy policy.
Rep. Clarence Brown of Ohio, who of-
ten speaks for Republicans on energy
matters, said the compromise is the
only way to end government controls on
oil prices. "If this bill does not pass, we
will have the possibility of - the
president....re-regulating oil in this
country, further discouraging produc-
tion."
Archer's effort to send the bill back to
conference in an attempt to win better
treatment of independent producers
was rejected, 227-185.
First Ward City Council candidate
Don Hubbard was quoted out of context
in a story Wednesday about the MSA
decision not to endorse him in the April
city election. He said, "I am not a
student candidate, I am a candidate
running for a city office who is a
student." Hubbard, an LSA junir, is
running as a Republican.

Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
Ford pays Carter a
'courtesty call'
WASHINGTON-Gerald Ford who says the national interest depends
on unseating Jimmy Carter, but who continues to hedge on whether he will
try to do it himself, visited the White House yesterday for a friendly chat
with the president.
The WhiteHouse described the get-together as a "courtesy call." "It
was a very good meeting. I enjoyed it," Ford said. Ford called Carter a
"decent, honorable man" but said the two have strong differences on how
best to run the nation.
Iran gov t turns
[against militants
Iranian Foreign Minister Sadegh Ghotbzadeh asserted yesterday that
Iranians no longer supported the militants holding 50 American hostages in
the U.S. Embassy in Teheran, and said that the government would be able to
end the 131-day crisis as soon as it consolidated its authority. Even if this
happens, however, Ghotbzadeh indicated the government could not exercise
that authority until after Iran's new parliament had been elected in May.
"Time is working against the Islamic students holdink the embassy,"
Ghotbzadeh said. "The Iranian people were before fully with the students.
Today it is no longer the case."
House reps to devise
compromise subway plan.
LANSING-State House Democrats asked Speaker Bobby Crim yes-
terday to appoint a bipartisan committee to draft a compromise Detroit
subway plan, a move that was in response to mounting criticism of a plan
submitted-by suburban lawmakers.
The 28-1 caucus vote followed five hours of discussion on the
controversial resolution. Crim said he would appoint the panel-to include
five Democrats and three Republicans-on Friday. He expressed hope-that
the group, which should begin Monday, will make their recommendation by
the end of next week.
Effort begins to revive TMI
MIDDLETOWN-Donning protective clothing and-carrying sensitivity
monitors, two engineers ventured briefly inside Three Mile Island's reactor
building airlock yesterday to make tests. essential to decontaminating the
crippled nuclear plant.
"It's a vital operation," said John Collins, chief of operations for the U.S.
Nuclear Regulatory Commission at the site. "The important thing is that it
provides additional data necessary to make a final assessment on the
manned entry into the containment building itself. It will give us an idea
what type of hazards they may encounter."
No one had yet been in the area since it was sealed off during the nation's
worst commercial nuclear accident last March 28.
Moslem rebels retake town
ISLAMABAD-Moslem rebels have retaken a town in eastern Afghan-
istan, gunning down more than 100 Soviet paratroopers as they dropped into
the combat zone, a guerrilla spokesman said yesterday.
The Afghan guerrillas, fighting the estimated 80,000 Soviet forces
propping up' the regime of Marxist President Babrak Karmal, call
themselves Omujahideen, or freedom fighters.
"Soviet forces withdrew from Asmar-we prefer to use the term
retreated-after taking heavy losses when trying to land parachute troops
sent in as reinforcements," the Jamaiti spokesman said in Peshawar, a
village in northern Pakistan.
Colombia talks break off
BOGOTA-The fifth round of negotiations between the government
and the guerrillas who hold a group of high-level diplomats hostage here
ended in a flash of anger.A masked woman representing the terrorists
walked away from the talks visibly enraged and shouting, "We will win or
die.".
Informants have indicated the guerrillas and the government have
agreed on a ransom-below the $50 million demanded shortly after the
embassy seizure Feb. 27. The government has agreed to give the guerrillas
safe passage out of the country as long ay none of the hostages are harmed.
The main stumbling block reportedly remained the demand that the
government free some of the alductors' comrades, whom they claim are
political prisoners.

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Daily Official Bulletin
Friday, March 14. 1980
Daily Calendar
Industrial & Operation Engineering: Robert L.
Smith, "Turnpike Resultsfor Single Location
Capacity Expansion," 206 W. Eng .9a.m.
Center for S&SEAS: Nesha Haiff. "Stereo.types of
Muslin Women in India," Lane Commons, noon.
School of Music: Charles Atkinson, "Medieval
Music," Stearns, 4 p.m.
General Notice
Henry Russel Lecture: Professor Halvor N.
Christensen, Professor of Biological Chemistry,
"Membrane Domination of Biological Energy Ex-
changes,"; Award Recipients: Philip Ginerich,
Associate Professor of Geological Science and
Robert Kirshner, Assistant Professor of Astronomy,
Tuesday. Marci 18 at 4 p.m.
Noreste,
A AmlaaglA'hw

(UISPS 344-900)
Volume XC, No. 128
Friday, March 14, 1980

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and Laszlo Slomovits
in concert

Editor-in-Chief .................... MARK PARRENT
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HOWARD WITT
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RJ. SMITH
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DENNIS HARVEY
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