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January 15, 1980 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-01-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

al

LOOKING FOR
MEDIA EXPERIENCE?
The Public Interest and Research Group in
Michigan (PIRGIM) is looking for persons '7
interested in radio, TV, Video Production,z
, Journalism, or Public Relations to serve as
media task force coordinator. Earn credit
. ' while gaining practical experience!
For more information call:
PIR GIM: 662-6597,

Page 2-Tuesday, January 15, 1980-The Michigan Daily
MORE WOMEN SMOKERS IS REASON:
Lung cancer on the rise

From UPI and AP
WASHINGTON-Lung cancer among
women is growing so fast it could sur-
pass the death rate for breast cancer by
1983, Surgeon General Julius Richmond
said yesterday.
"An epidemic of lung cancer among
women has now begun, the result of
smoking initiated during World War II
and in the years immediately
following," Richmond told a news con-
ference.
HE SAID WHILE men began
smoking intensively during the first
world war, "women began in
significant numbers during World War
II and the years immediately after-
ward.
"Because of the long latency period
of lung cancer, other cancers and.

P~
J. A

chronic obstructive lung disease, the
full consequences of cigarette smoking
by men began appearing 30 years ago.
They are just now beginning to appear
among women."
Richmond said the lung cancer death
rate among women has tripled from
fewer than five deaths per 100,000 in the
early 1960s to 15 deaths per 100,000 in
1978. "This translates into ap-
proximately 25,000 deaths per year," he
said.
RICHMOND ALSO said there was
''new evidence of the harm which
cigarette smoking during pregnancy
exerts on the fetus and the newborn
baby." Women who smoke while they
are pregnant have lighter weight
babies and are more likely to suffer
from pregnancy complications. He also
said they have a higher percentage of
premature babies and risk the deaths of
newborn infants.
Concerning pregnant smokers,
Richmond said changing the warning
label on cigarette packs and adver-
tisements to specifically warn pregnant
women of the dangers of smoking
"might be a good idea."
Connie Drath, director of com-

munications for the Tobacco Institute,
the industry's lobbying group,
questioned whether a change in the
warning labels was necessary.
"You would have had to have been a
cave-dweller to have missed the anti-
smoking warnings and messages
during the last 15 years," she said.
THE TOBACCO Institute issued its
own report on female smoking and
health this month, challenging any con-
crete link between smoking and lung
cancer or birth defects.
"An initial question is whether the
reported increases in lung cancer is
real, or is due to factors such an enhan-
ced detection capability," the institute
said.
"Almost certainly, improved
diagnostic techniques and heightened
concern about lung cancer have con-
tributed to the increase. Thus, it may be
too facile to blame the 'increase' on a
greater popularity of smoking among
women..
"Clearly, suspects other than
smoking must be considered in lung
cancer development. Among these are
air pollution, occupational exposure
and family history of lung cancer."

'80-'81
dorm rates
may see
13.2%jump,
(Continued from Page 1)
UPON APPROVAL by the Regents,
residents living in converted rooms
would take over the lease of a resident
in another room should the resident
decide to move out of the residence hallO
Because this could cause a greater
vacancy rate, an increase of dorm rates
of $14 per student, .07 per cent rate in-
crease, would be necessary.
Among the proposals which were
considered but rejected by the commit-
tee were the addition of breakfast and
Sunday evening meals, paper towels
and electric blow dryers in the
bathrooms, and increases in the wages
of student employees.
Snustad, a non-voting committee
member, said he favors continuing
weekend food service consolidation.
"I think the cost of housing here is
high," he said. "We tend to offer ser-
vices that are very expensive. I support
weekend consolidation as one step in
cutting the cost of housing rates."

-yr

IF

HOUSING DIVISION
RESIDENT STAFF JOB OPENINGS FOR 1980-81
INFORMATIONAL MEETINGS
Monday, Jan. 21-Thursdayi Jan. 24, 1980
COUZENS-January 21, Monday, 7:00-8:00 P.M.-Main Lobby
OXFORD-January 21, Monday, 7:00-8:00 P.M.-Seeley Lounge
SOUTH QUAD-January 21, Monday, 8:30-9:30 P.M.-West Lounge
ALICE LLOYD-January 22, Tuesday, 8:00-9:00 P.M.-Blue Carpet Lounge
BURSLEY-January 22, Tuesday, 9:00-10:00 P.M.-West Dining Room
WEST QUAD
BARBOUR & NEWBERRY-January 22, Tuesday, 7:00-8:00 P.M.-Dining Room No.1
EAST QUAD-January 24, Thursday, 7:30-8:30 P.M-Room 126
MARKLEY-January 24, Thursday, 6:30-7:30 P.M.-North Pit
STOCKWELL-January 24, Thursday, 7:30-8:30 P.M.-Main Lounge
MINORITY PEER ADVISORS
BURSLEY-January 23, Wednesday, 9:00-10:00 P.M.-Minority Lounge
SOUTH QUAD-January 23, Wednesday, 7:00-8:00 P.M.-Afro Lounge
COUZENS-January 23, Wednesday, 7:00-8:00 P.M.-Minority Lounge
The above informational sessions for prospective staff applicants have been scheduled to discuss the dimensions
and expectations of the various staff positions, how to apply in the buildings and/or houses, who to contact,
criteria to be used in the selection procedure and the number of positions that are likely to be vacant.

1
F

Pot use declining among high

school students, ISR s

JANUARY 17, 1980: STAFF APPLICATIONS AVAILABLE IN HOUSING OFFICE, 1500 S.A.B.
JANUARY 24, 1980: DEADLINE FOR APPLICATION FORMS FOR REAPPLYING STAFF DUE
In housing office, 1500 S.A.B.
JANUARY 30, 1980: DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONFORMS FOR NEW APPLICANTS DUE IN
HOUSING OFFICE, 1500 S.A.B.

(Continued from Page 1)
Patrick O'Malley.
"A large proportion of seniors have
tried marijuana and a saturation level
has been reached," Johnston said.
"Most of those who want to try it have
already done so."
Results indicated that sixty per cent
of high school seniors have used pot at
least once, while half had used it in the
previous 12 months and 37 per cent had
used it in the month prior to the survey.
THE SECOND explanation for the
leveling is increased media attentioin to
health risks from regular pot smoking.
Significantly more seniors in 1979 than
in 1978 believe that regular pot users
run a "great risk" of harming them-
selves, the researchers said. Ad-
ditionally, the proportion of seniors
saying they personally disapprove of
regular use of the drug hasx been in-
creasing gradually over the past two
years.
Marijuana usage by students plan-
ning on four years of college is lower
than those who do not plan on con-
tinuing their education, the study said.
Females indulge less often than males.
The notion that marijuana leads to
harder drugs was not upheld. The

proportion of young people in the study
who turned to other illegal drugs has
not changed appreciably during the
studied interval.
BUT ONE specific drug - cocaine -
has seen a dramatic increase in
popularity, the researchers found. The
annual rate of use doubled from six per
cent in 1975 to 12 per cent in 1979.
"(Cocaine) usage is following a
traditional pattern. We largely see the
spread of drug behavior from older
persons to younger," Johnston said.
The number of seniors disapproving
of cocaine diminished since 1975,
although the research shows that 75 per
cent of all seniors still disapprove of
experimenting with it. Only one in six
or seven has ever tried sniffing coke.
COCAINE - priced at approximately
$100 per gram locally - often is con-
sidered a rich person's drug, but
nonetheless; high school seniors are
managing to purchase the white
powder.
"(Many) underestimate the amount
of the students' discretionary income,"
Johnston said. Money not earmarked
for a specific purpose often is spent on

tudy says
drugs, he said, and the perceived
availability of the substance has in-
creased.
Other drugs showing increased
popularity over the last few years ar
inhalants and amphetamines. Nearl
one-fifth of the seniors have used an
inhalant at some time, and one in every
nine surveyed have tried amyl and
butyl nitrites - "snappers" and "pop-
pers."
Drugs showing a decline were
sedatives, tranquilizers, and heroin.
Opiates, other than heroin, have had a
steady usage since 1975, and the use of
hallucinogens has stabilized after 4
decline. One out of eight seniors repor-
ted using PCP, or "angel dust."
Since beginning the survey, Johnston
said those favoring decriminalization of
marijuana has increased. He said- 12
per cent said pt should be completely
legal, 30 per cent favor
decriminalization, 25 per cent though it
should remain a crime, and 14 per cent
said they had no opinion.
Survey results are published i
"Drugs and the Class of '78" and "197
Highlights: Drugs and the Nation's
High School Students."

4L "

11

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Nader calls admission
tests fraudulent. biased

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In a front page photo in Sunday's
Daily, Michigan basketball player John
Garris was incorrectly identified as
Thad Garner. The Purdue player was
Arnette Hallman. In the same issue, it
was reported that Dr. Gerald O'Connor
was injured while carrying tackle Dale
Keitz off the field. The physician was
actually Dr. Robert Anderson. The
Daily regrets the errors.
Daily Official Bulletin
Tuesday, January 15, 1980
Daily Calendar
WUOM: King Commemoration, 'Missplaced
values," Reverend Martin Luther King, Sen., spoke
at the University of North Carolina last year, 10:05
a .m.
Physics/Astronomy: J. R. Chelikowsky, U-
Oregon, "PSeudopotential Methods of Bulk and Sur-
face Structure of Semiconductors," 2038 Randall, 4
p.m.
Museum of zoology: Philip S. Ward, "Systematic
& Genetic Relationships in a Species Complex of
Pnerine Ants," 1033 Kellogg, 4 p.m.
Bioengineering: Elden Frisch, "Consideration for
BiomedicalMaterials for Implants of Silicone," 1042
E. Eng., 4 p.m.
Great Lakes & Marine Environmental: Clifford P.
Rice, "PCBs in the Great Lakes," 165 Chrysler Ctr.,
4 p.m.
Geology & Minerology: Arvid M. Johnson, "Forms
of Folds," 4001 CC Little, 4 p.m.
Aerospace Eng./Computer/Info & Control Eng.:
Bernard L. Walsh, "Hughes Communications
Satellites: RF Electronics, Present and Future,"
1504 E.,Eng., 4p.m.
Computing Center: Brice Carnahan, "An In-
troduction to Digital Computers and Computing
Languages," Nat. Sci. Aud., 7:30 p.m.
C5&SEAS: Tobarak Hossain, Bangladesh Am-
bassador, "Bangladesh and the Burmese Refugee
Problem," Rackham Aud., 8 p.m.

(Continued from Page 1)
He claimed the ETS tests "exclude a
disproportionate number of minority
applicants who are capable of suc-
ceeding," and perpetuate class distin-
ctions "in the guise of merit."
Nairn said ETS should abandon its
claims of measuring aptitude or "its
future should be called into question."
THE COLLEGE Board recently
reported that in 1977, whites averaged
449 on the SAT verbal exam and 490 in
math, while blacks average 329 in ver-
bal and 355 in math. The exam is scored
on a 200-to-800 scale.
Turnbull said grades rise even more
sharply than SAT scores as family in-
come goes up.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
(USPS 344-900)
Volume XC, No.85
Tuesday, January 15, 1980
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday morn-
ings during the University year at 420
Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan
48109. Subscription rates: $12 Septem-
'ber through April (2 semesters) ;$13 by
mail outside Ann Arbor. Summer
session published Tuesday through
Saturday mornings. Subscription rates:
$6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7.00 by mail out-
side Ann Arbor. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POST-
IASTER: Send address changes to
THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard
Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.

He claimed some minority and rural
students from obscure schools would be
hurt if the tests were eliminated
because colleges would no longer have
a common yardstick to measure them
against.
Turnbull said parents want standar-
dized tests to measure their children's
performance. "If testing is weakend,
education and society will be losers,'@
he said.
Nader said colleges and professional
schools should place more weight on
students' grades, extracurriculars, in-
terviews and actual achievements out-
side school. More students would
engage in community organizing if they
knew it would affect their admission to
law school, he said.
Another test critic, Dr. Warner Slac*
of the Harvard Medical School faculty,
said at the Nader news conference,
"Why should the test-writers' ex-
perience with little-used words and
tricky math be used as the basis for
judging other people's aptitudes?"
New York State recently adopted a
law mandating disclosure of college
admission test questions and answers
after the exams are scored. A similar
bill is pending in the House and in at le asj
seven states, according to Bob Ohlopa
of the Public Interest Research Group.

1. ni/ v s 7/ ' a /s vm.s ./ s .r --,- sC)+i -! -/

1980 HOPWOOD Underclassman Awards

Academy of American Poets,
PoAtrv Awards.

Bain-Swiggett,

& Gutterman

;.. U

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