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February 22, 1980 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-02-22

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, February 22, 1980-Page 3

Students learn of draft

By JOYCE FRIEDEN
University engineering students
found out how they can stay out of the
armed forces - and what kinds of work
they can do if they should be drafted -
at a talk by two commnunity leaders last
night at the West Engineering Building.
The speakers, Rev. Tom Shoemaker
of the Ann Arbor Wesley Foundation
and Reserve Officers Training Corps
(ROTC) Captain Ken Close, addressed
15 engineering students on the topic of
"Engineers and the Draft."
Shoemaker explained the options
available to engineers who do not wish
to be drafted. He cited draft resistance
- publicizing one's opposition to con-
scription - and simply not registering
for the draft as two alternatives that
are "outside the law."
ONE OPTION "within the law," ac-
cording to Shoemaker, is to- file as a
conscientious objector (someone op-
posed to participation in any war for
ideological reasons).
After explaining the process of
becoming a conscientious objector
(CO), Shoemaker cautioned, "The
largest group of people who desire to
become conscientious objectors wind
up in the military. This is because they
didn't know their rights or how to
defend their claims." He emphasized
the importance of applying for con-
scientious objector status as early as
possible. "Draft boards look askance at
people who file for conscientious objec-
tor status after they receive their draft
notices," he said.
Close focused on the opportunities

available to the engineer upon being
drafted. He explained that draftees who
score high on the induction tests
generally are inducted into some sort of
corps (such as the engineering corps)
while those who get lower scores are
assigned to specific jobs, such as cook
or clerk.
WITHIN THE engineering corps,
there are several divisions, including
civil engineering (designing bridges),
combat engineering (clearing mine
fields), and cartography (drawing
combat maps).
"What you do as an engineer in the
Army is nothing like the work you do
here (as a civilian)," Close said. "In
the army, your jobs are very much
related to combat."
Both Close and Shoemaker seemed to
feel that Carter's registration proposal
does not mean the draft is imminent.
"Any talk now beyond and up to
registration is pure conjecture,"
Shoemaker said. He urged those again-
st registration to write their
Congresspersons in protest.
"Let no one assume that we are going
to have the draft, because (to do so
would disregard) the governmental
process of feedback. You can.still have
some say in the registration issue," he
added.
Close emphasized that if registration
were put into effect, it might actually
prevent a war. "Registration would
serve as a deterrent to world
aggression. It would show aggressors
that we would have the willpower of the
American public behind us if it became
necessary to fight," he said.

Paul Mazursky's 1976 '
NEXT STOP, GREENWICH VILLAGE
LENNY BAKER, CHRISTOPHER WALKEN, SHELLY WINTERS, ANTONIO FARGAS
and ELLEN GREEN in Mazursky's "AMARCORD"-A romantic comedy based
on his own experiences as a struggling young actor in New York City. The
young Masursky leaves his Jewish mama (Winters) for a Greenwich Village
apartment, a love affair, and a wild assortment of fun-loving friends. By the
director of AN UNMARRIED WOMAN among many other films.
Short: CLOSED MONDAYS-museum art objects come to life on their day
off.
Sat.: MADAME ROSA
Sun.: Raoul Walsh's MANPOWER

CINEMA GUILD

TONIGHT AT
7 &9:1 S

OLD ARCH.

AUD.
$1 .50

-I

Introduced by
The English Department
in conjunction with
The Symposium in Critical Theory
presents a public lecture
by
FREDRIC JAMESON
Professor of French at Yale University
"MARX ISM & STRUCTURALISM"

MONDAY, FEB. 25-4 pm

RACKHAM AMPHITHEATER

1..

STAR

BAR

109 N. Main St.-69-0109
APPEARING TONIGHT:

OalYV rnoto by LIbA RLAUSNER
REV. TOM SHOEMAKER of the Ann Arbor Wesley Foundation and ROTC
Captain Ken Close address approximately 15 students last night on options
open to engineers who do not wish to be drafted.

DICK SIEGEL and His Ministers of Melody
2 drinks for the price of 1 between 9 and 11
"Ann Arbor's Original Honky Tonk Dance Bar"

r

Residence Hall Council to initiate paper
recycling program among Hill dorms

By MAURA CARRY
Whey Markley, Mosher-Jordan, and
Stockwell residents return from their
spring break, they'll be tying up their
old newspapers in bundles and turning
them in to be recycled, as part of a trial
or pilot recycling program that may ex-
tend to all residence halls in the fall.
The recycling program is being
organized by the University's Residen-
ce Hall Council. "Recycle Ann Arbor"
wili be picking up papers from the three
dorms every two weeks, once the
program has been announced and

publicized in the halls. If the pilot
program is a success, all the dorms will
be participating next year in a campus-
wide recycling project. t
COUNCIL chairperson Carol Cachy
explained that the recycling project is
only one of the ideas that the Residence
Hall Council has for next year. The
Council, she said, was re-instituted this
year by the Housing Office after a
three-year absence, in order to get
more student input into housing
decisions and policies. The council's
purpose is two-fold - first, to work with

Housing and make the students'
opinions heard, and second, to work out
problems within the residence halls by
bringing students from the different
halls together. "We're kind of a com-
munication link," Cachy said.
Cachy explained that the council,
which has one representative for every
360 students in each hall, meets with the
housing directors every week to go over
policies and make suggestions. Studen-
ts need to know that they can go to their
hall representatives with complaints or
ideas, and know that the reps will take
the comments directly to the top of

Housing that week, Cachy said,
The representatives on this year's
council were elected in their individual
halls last fall. Cachy explained that fall
elections are necessary if freshpersons
are to be able to run.
"RESIDENCE,. HALLS are
predominantly freshmen, and we need
this input," she said. To be elected as a
representative, a student needs to live
in a residence hall, but may not be a
staff member. Presently there are 26
positions on the council, about 20 o f
which are filled. The other positions
will be filled when more elections take
place after spring break.

STARTING TONIGHT!
Showing Tonight at 7:05 ONLY
Sat. Sun. 1:05-3:05-5:05-7:05-9:30
TheUlimate Csmic Coredy!

4c
T'

iir

GET HAPPY

SAVE $$$

FILMS

Gargoyle Films-The 39 Steps, 7, 10 p.m., The Lady Vanishes, 8:30 p.m.,
100 Hutchins Hall.
Cinema Guild-Next Stop, Greenwich Village, 7, 9:15 p.m., Old Arch. Aud.
Alternative Action-Love and Death, 7, 9 p.m., Nat. Sci. Aud.
AAFC-An Unmarried Woman,.3, 7, 9:19 p.m., Assault On Precinct 13, 7
p.m. ; Drive He Said, 8:45 p.m., MLB 4.
Cinema Two-Sullivan's Travels, 7, 10 p.m.; The Great McGinty, 8:30
p.m., Aud. A, Angell.
Germ.Lang. & Lit.-Metropolis, 7 p.m., Lec. Rm. 105, MLB.
MEETINGS
U-M Folklore Society-Friends of Traditional Music-Social, 8:30 p.m., 802
W. Washington.-_
Hillel-Meekreh Shabbat dinner, 6 p.m., Markley Concourse Lounge.
Reform minyan, 8 p.m.; Oneg Shabbat, 8:30 p.m., 100 Hutchins Hall.
SPEAKERS
English Department-John Douglass, "Creative Anarchy and Invention,"
noon, 7th floor Haven Hall, Seminar Room.
PIRGIM-Zolton Ferency, "Criminal Code Revision,"= 7 p.m., Kuenzel
room, Union.
WUOM-Prof. Ann Siedman," South Africa: A Golden Parish for the
West," 10 a.m., WUOM, 57.14.
La Raza Law Students Association-Jose Angel Gutierrez, "Racism and
the Legal System,"8 p.m., Lawyer's Club Lounge.
UAC Viewpoint Lectures Alpha Phi Alpha-Dick Gregory, "Civil Rights in
America Today." 8 p.m., Union Ballroom.
CEW-Virginia Nordby, "Issues in Achieving Equality for Women," noon,
Michigan League Conference rooms 4-5.
Dept. of Medical Care-Jo Surpin, "An Experiment in Prospective
Reimbursement," 11 a.m., 3000 Vaughn , SPH.
Ctr. for S. & S.E. Asian Studies-Thomas McCormick, "Rainy Seasons
with the Jains of Gurarat, 1979," noon, Lane Hall Commons Rm.
Museum of Zoology-Steven Arnold, "Recent Developments Sexual Sele&-
tion Theory," 4 p.m., Lec rm. 2, MLB.
Museum of Anthropology-Lawrence H. Keeley, "Micro-wear analysis of
Stone Tools and its results at Belgian Epi-Paleolithic Site," 8 p.m., Lee. rm.
.2.
Hillel-Yahuda Radday, "Despoiling the Egyptians: The Computer and
the Bible Text," 8:30 p.m., 1429 Hill St.
PERFORMANCES
PTB Guest Artist Series-"Eden", 8p.m., Power Center.
RC Players-"Exit the King", 8 p.m., E. Quad Aud.
School of Music-Faculty Harpsicord/Viola da Gambe Recital, 8 p.m.,
Recital Hall.
Ark-National Recovery Act, Fiddle and Banjo, 9p.m.,1421 Hill St.
Canterbury Loft-"Waiting For Godot," 8 p.m., 332 State St.
Pendleton Arts Ctr.-soprano Carolyn Tion, music of Copeland and Ber-
nstein, 8 p.m., Pendleton room, Union.
MISCELLANEOUS

at
+

OPEN 7 DAYS
for Lunch & Dinner
Sun & Mon 'til 9 PM
Tues-Thurs 'til 11 PM
Fri & Sat 'til 1 AM
1301 S. University
665-2650

HAPPY HOUR .
MON.-THURS. 8 PM 'til Close
Hamburgers $1.69.....................SAVE
French Fries 254........ .............SAVE
Local Draft Beer Mug 504 ..............SAVE'
Pitcher $2.25........... SAVE'
House Cocktails 994 .............. . ....SAVE

51C
55t;
204;
75C<
26C

iDAii 'BANNON-BRNNARELLE' JOH CARPEINTER& DAN O'BANNON
JOHCARkNTER -"JAC IIARRIS -"DAN YBANNON & RON COBB
Frmn A TAI IC RELEASINGCOR1P1ORKION PG PARENTAL GUIDANCE SUGGENSTED
!Iad m t L QAUJ I E k P dI CSOME MATERIAL MtAY NOT RE SUITABLE FOR CIELDEIN .

4 i 11

1

"IT'S A GRAND OPENING"
All U of M students, faculty and staff are welcome! !
Come Celebrate SUPER FRIDAYV

I

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WE WILL HAVE:

I

4-11 p.m. in the "New" University C/ub
" 5O Beverages
" Complimentary Appetizer Table
" Hot Hors D'oeuvres

I

* Wide Screen T.V. video tapes featuring
Mr. Bill, Richard Pryor Live in Concert,
and The National Lampoon Show

- - * U 0 - _ tt _ It ,/

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