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February 22, 1980 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1980-02-22

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2-Friday,.February 22, 1980-The Michigan Daily

INTERESTED IN A CAREER IN A
PROFESSIONAL HEALTH FIELD?
Consider a career as a Doctor of Podiatric Medicine.
A recent government report to the President and Congress predicts a
serious shortage of podiatrists by 1980. You can ploy a vital port in filing
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The application deadline is April 1, 1980. For more inforination or an appli-
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Board to consider
a uniform curriculum

By MARY FARANSKI
The Ann Arbor Board of Education
will soon vote on a proposal to standar-
dize intermediate school curricula. The
plan, discussed at Wednesday's board
meeting, is a response to an academic
situation some call unfair.
Because each school in the city is
basically free to design and run its own
curriculum, counseling, and other af-
fairs, some schools send their students
to high school better prepared than
students from other areas, proponents
of the plan claim.
UNDER THE proposal conceived by
Dr. Richard Stock, Director of Secon-
dary Education, and by Dr. Lee Han-
sen, Associate Superintendent for
Curriculum and Instruction, course
requirements would be uniform
throughout the intermediate schools. A
similar range of elective courses for all
city students would also be required.
The plan has met with considerable
controversy because many of Ann Ar-
bor's intermediate school teachers,
who turned out in large numbers at the
board meeting, say they do not want to
be told how to run their courses. They
said they also wish to preserve the
educational programs that they
designed themselves, and that differ
from school to school.

Required daily courses in the
following are set forth by the proposal:
Language Arts, Mathematics, and
Social Studies, three years each; Scien-
ce, two years; Physical Education, one
and one-half years; Health, one-half
year; and Art, Home Economics, and
Industrial Arts,12 weeks each.
ELECTIVE COURSES will be
discussed by the board before next
week's vote on the whole proposal.
Five teachers from each of the five
intermediate schools had met with the
Ann Arbor Education Association
earlier to discuss their reactions to the
proposal, which included goals for their
students' intellectual, physical,
psychological, and social development.
They suggested some changes, but ap-
proved the plan unanimously. The final
vote, however, is up to the school board.
In explaining why the four groups of
goals, as well as a description of
emerging adolescents, were included in
the proposal, school board president
Kathy Dannemiller said, "We needed to
go back to the 'why' of the proposal."
This issue has been debated for
several years now, and Dannemiller
said that now it looks like the plan is
likely to pass and begin being im-
plemented in the schools in the coming
school year.

Compiied fron Associated Press and
United Press International reports

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IGH ACK

Agaimst on unfoir low thou makes. young Americans second
class citizens. JOIN THE MOVEMENT TO
LOWER THE DRINKING AGE
O.trganizati onal Meeting
Tuesday, February 26, 1980
Michigan Cnion nm. 4

nn Arbor Citizens for a Fair Drinking Age:

REP. PERRY BUtLARD-Chalrman
KIM WHEELER-Director 665-1284
J. P. AOAMS-MSA Coordinator 763-3241i

The word's rut on ca>mpus .
If you want to be in the know, you should
be re$ding The Daily
. .the latest in news, sports, les affaires
academiques, and entertainment...
CALL 764-0558 to order your subscription today

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Hunting for fund
Catch:
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On Monday
Look for THE LOOK

UAC VIEWPOINT/ALPHA PHI ALPHA
PRESENTATION
February 22:

. .
....:
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AFL-CIO to break sex
barrier in top posts
BAL HARBOUR, Fla. - The male-dominated AFL-CIO agreed yesterday
to set aside strongly held tradition and name at least one woman to a top
leadership position for the first time in the 99-year history of American trade
union federations.
AFL-CIO President Lane Kirkland announced the federation's all-male
executive council would set aside two of its 35 seats for a woman and a
minority representative as vacancies occur. Several union representatives
presidents on the council are expected to retire this year.
Joyce Miller, president of the Coalition of Labor Union Women, hailed
the action as "a tremendous move that is much stronger and more than I had
expected."
President Tito 's burial site
rumored to being prepared
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia - the rumor in this country is that construc-
tion workers have prepared a temporary burial site for President Josip Tito,
despite the fact that he hasn't died yet. >
After days of almost frantic round-the-clock work, construction crews
have stopped work on an area in front of a Belgrade museum, where uncon-
firmed reports say Tito's body will be held until a permanent site is found.
Doctors said yesterday Tito's condition was stable but serious.
Report claims Soviets took
part in U.S. official's death
WASHINGTON - A State Department report on the death last year of
U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan Adolph Dubs-says Soviet officials played a
key role in the events leading up to his killing.
Dubs was killed last February when Afghan poliee opened fire on a
second-floor room at the Kabul Hotel where he had been taken by uniden-
tified kidnappers.
The report said that Soviets were observed "taking an operational role
just prior to and during the assault." .
Connally running
out of money
WASHINGTON - John Connally, who once boasted a $10-million
presidential campaign, is running out of money at a critical stage in his
quest for the White House.
Connally, the biggest spender among those entered in the 1980 presiden-
tial race, finished about $45,000 in the red at the end of January, u~cording to
a report filed with the Federal Election Commission yesterday.
Kelly resigns
from conference
WASHINGTON - Rep. Richard Kelly of Florida, the only Republican to
be implicated in the FBI undercover operation known as ABSCAM, resigned
yesterday from the House Republican Conference rather than be expelled
for admitting he took a $25,000 bribe.
Kelly, who said he accepted the money as part of his own investigation,
told the closed caucus he wanted to "save the Republican Party from an ac-
tion that would not be appropriate," according to House Minority Leader
John.Rhodes (R-Ariz.).
Rhodes said there was a "strong sentiment" to oust Kelly from the con-
ference, which includes all House GOP members. But he said Republicans
were planning to postpone any decision on Kelly for a week when the
congressman resigned.
Reyes Syndrome detected
in 4 more children
State health offiicals reported yesterday four additional cases of Reyes
Snydrome, a rare and sometimes fatal side effect of viral illnesses such as
influenza and chicken pox.
A recent boost in the number of Reyes Syndrome cases reported around
Michigan has been linked to a flu outbreak sweeping the state's school-age
population.
The victims are four boys, ranging in ages from seven to 14 years, from
Tuscola, Genesee and Iron Counties.
(USPS 344-900)

Volume XC, No. 118
Friday, February 22; 1980
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109.
Subscription rates: $12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail
outside Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday
mornings. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7 by mail outside Ann
Arbor. Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard Street,
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The Michigan Doily is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to United Press International.
Pacific News Service, Los Angeles Times Syndicate, and Field Newspaper Syndicate.
News room: (313) 764-0552, 76-DAILY: Sports desk: 764-0562: Circulation: 764-0558; Classified advertising:
764-0557: Display advertising: 764-0554: Billing: 764-0550: Composing Room: 764-0556.

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Editor-in-Chief................... MARK PARRENT
Monaging Editor.................: MITCH CANTOR
City Editor......................PATRICIA HAGEN
University Editor...................TOMAS MIRGA
Editorial Page Editors.............. JOSHUA PECK
HOWARD WITT
Magazine Editors.. ... . ... . ...... E.LISA ISAACSON
R.J. SMITH
Arts Editors...................MARK COLEMAN
DENNIS HARVEY
Sports Editor....................ALAN FANGER
Executive Sports Editors............... ELISA FRYE
GARY LEVY
SCOTT tLEWIS
wce recwQ7cc c, . na L &.,r

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Leslie-Graham, Michael Greenlees, Laurel Groger,

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