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February 08, 1980 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-02-08

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01

Page 6-Friday, February 8, 1980-The Michigan Daily
The Department of
English Language & Literature
Critical Theory Symposium
presents
a lecture by
RENE'GIRERD
on
"Comedies of Errors":
Shakespeare, Platas, Moliere
Monday, Feb. 11 at 4:00pm
Rackham Amphitheatre
Do a Tree a Favor: Recycle Your Daily

I

Good Time Charleys
announces
The
First Annual
Space Invader: Championshi

New mag
focuses on
black issues
By. KEVIN TOTTIS
A new monthly publication "geared
to those with black interests" is slated
to appear around campus sometime
during the middle of this month.
"Black Perspective," according to
LSA junior and General Manager Tony
Williams, will contain "the type of
stories that will interest black
collegiates" and basically will "inform
the black student population of the dif-
ferent supportive services that pertain
to the black community."
APPROXIMATELY 25 students have
been working on producing this month's
issue, according to Editor-in-Chief and
LSA senior Vincent Dent. The first edi-
tion is expected to include articles on
black student attrition rates, divest-
ment, and Black History Month. Dent
added that the magazine will contain
entertainment articles as well as news.
"We hope that everyone in the Ann
Arbor community will pick up the
paper and learn some things about
black existence in Ann Arbor,"
Williams said.
All of the content in the magazine will
be the product of freelancers, Williams
said. He also emphasized that non-
blacks are encouraged to submit ar-
ticles. "Anyone who wants to write an
article can, regardless of their color."
ALTHOUGH ENTIRELY student
run, "Black Perspective" does have an
advisory board whose members include
Journalism faculty and professional
journalists.
Williams said the magazine will be
free and will be distributed in a manner
similar to the University Record.
Funding for the publication, accor-
ding to Dent, has come from a variety
of sources including advertising, the
Afro/American Center, private sour-
ces, the group's own fund raisers anti
President Harold Shapiro's
discretionary fund.
Dent said that overall, "Black Per-
spective's" major goal is continuity.
"We want to establish a paper that is
here long after we're gone."

I

I

AP Photo

Pin ball wizards

When: SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1980
Times: QUALIFYING ROUND- 1pm-5pm
FINALS -- 9pm-midnight

Soviet Olympic squad members arrived in Lake Placid yesterday and indulged in American pinball while relaxing
before the start of the winter games. Lord Killanin, President of the International Olympic Committee (IOC), who
arrived in New York Wednesday, said the upcoming IOC meeting will be one of the most critical due to the Moscow
Games boycott requests by many countries.
Syrian withdrawl announcement
heightens fighting in Lebanon

RULES:

1. Limited to first 100 applicants
2. Applicants must be 184toenter.
Proper identification required.-
3. Applicants will pay for their own games.

4. Qualifying round will consist of 3 games. Total
score of these games will be considered for the
finals. Sixteen contestants with the highest 3-a
game total will compete in the finals.
5. No entry fee. Entries can be submitted (to the
Good Time Charley's bar) no earlier than 2:00
p.m. Monday, February 11, 1980 and no later than
5:00 p.m. Saturday, February 16, 1980.
FIRST PRIZE $5~o m
NAME '
ADDRESS
PHONE
DATE/TIME

From AP and UPI
BEIRUT, Lebanon - Rival Christian
groups battled with mortars and ar-
tillery in northern Lebanon yesterday
and five combatants were reported,
killed. In Beirut, snipers killed a
civilian motorist and wounded two
pedestrians on the highway connecting
the Christian and Moslem sectors.
High-flying Israeli jets drew anti-air-
craft fire from Syrian and Palestinian
gunners and a clash between Israelis
and Palestinians was reported in the
south.

his troops out of Beirut, criticized
Lebanese leaders for not making peace
since the war ended. He agreed to delay
the withdrawal for a few days to allow
the government to plan ways to fill the
security void.
THE DECISION stunned all major
parties to the Lebanese problem, in-
cluding Yasser Arafat's Palestine
Liberation Organization (PLO) whose
guerrillas are based here.
Syrian President Hafez Assad has
delayed the pullout for a few days, and
the Lebanese government is scram-
bling for means to fill the security
vacuum.'
Assad offered the only firm hint of the
reasons for the withdrawal when he ex-
coriated Lebanese politicians for doing
nothing to heal the wounds of the 1975-76
civil war that pitted Christians against
an J alliance of Moslems and
Palestinians.
HE ALSO said he did not want his
Beirut-based soldiers, estimated at
5,000 of 22,000 Syrian troops in Lebanon,
performing functions of the Lebanese

police.
Well-informed sources say there is
much opposition in Syria to a prolonged
peacekeeping role because the troops
are being drawn into the corruption
fostered by Lebanon's post-civil war
chaos. "It's the worst kind of duty fo*
an army," said one military source.
Lebanon's embittered civil war com-
batants - the rightist Christians of east
Beirut and the leftist Moslems of west
Beirut - not only have failed to move
toward reconciliation, but have rear-
med their militias since the Syrians
arrived 3% years ago.
Diplomats, politicians and other well
informed observers, however, see mor
far-reaching motives and ramification
in Syria's planned withdrawal.
The immediate impact of Assad's
decision was to draw world attention to
Lebanon and Syria - which have been
upstaged by the Egyptian-Israeli peace
talks and the crises in Iran and
Afghanistan. Lebanese, PLO and Saudi
leaders rushed to Damascus after the
announcement.

U

INTO
THE

SECOND
CHANCE

MONDAY, FEB.11
DOOT BOY
SLIM,*
+ the SEX CHANGE BAND
w/ the ROOTETTES.
TICKETS $4.50 AVAILABLE AT
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WYPSILANTI
SECOND CHANCE
DOORS OPEN 9:00pm

TENSION WAS high three days after
Syria announced it would withdraw its
5,000 peacekeeping troops from Beirut.
Israeli Prime Minister Menachem
Begin warned that Israel would help
defend the Christians anywhere in
Lebanon if they were attacked.
Hours earlier, the military command
in Tel Aviv said Israeli soldiers repelled
four heavily armed Palestinian com-
mandos trying to infiltrate from
Lebanon Wednesday night.
A HAND grenade hurled by one of the
guerrillas slightly wounded one soldier
but the squad escaped into a U.N.-
controlled zone.
Jittery residents in Beirut again were
making runs on grocery stores, hoar-
ding canned goods, sugar, household
supplies and other staples against the
possibility the city might erupt again in
civil war as it did in 1975-76.
About 50 miles north of Beirut, gun-
men loyal to former President
Suleiman Franjieh fought with
militiamen of the rival Phalange party,
which fielded the largest Christian ar-
my during the 1975-76 civil war.
A PHALANGE spokesman said
Frankieh's men, backed by Syrian ar-
tillery, attacked two pro-Phalange
villages, Kanat and Deir Bill. Gover-
nment sources said five men were
killed and eight wounded.
Franjieh split with the Phalangists
over his support for Syria's November
1976 military intervention that ended
Lebanon's 19-month civil war.
Phalangists resented Syrian
peacekeeping curbs in Christian areas.
Syrian President Hafez Assad, in an-
nouncing Monday that he was pulling

Japan cuts $1.4 billion in
trade credits to USSR

TOKYO (UPI)-Japan decided
yesterday to stop giving new trade
credits to the Soviet Union in retaliation
for the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan,
government sources said.
Financial sources estimated that the
move means a freeze of about $1.4
billion in government credits originally
earmarked for two-way trade and
Soviet development projects.
THE DECISION came after a
meeting yesterday between Prime
Minister Masayoshi Ohira and senior
officials of the foreign, international
trade and industry and finance
ministries, government officials said.
Meanwhile, in Washington, President
Carter is sending Secretary of State
Cyrus Vance to West Germany for a

I

LAST
MARRIED ( )UPLE

discussion with allies on the Soviet
invasion of Afghanistan and Moscow's
divide and conquer diplomatic moves,
officials said yesterday.
The meeting will be held in Bon
around Feb. 20, the officials said; and
foreign ministers from West Germany,
France, Great Britain, and Canada are
expected to attend.
Officials said the agenda is likely to
include a discussion on the "several
billions of dollars" in economic and
military assistance Pakistan wants to
counter any Soviet incursions into its
territory.
SANTA SURVIVES
NEW YORK (AP)-Santa Claus is
still for real, at least for most children
up to 17 years old.
An informal poll here of youngsters
from 2 to 12 (some via their parents) by
a Christmas card manufacturer
showed that the cut-off age for belief in
St. Nick starts at about 7. Over 90 p
cent of the 6-and-under group clung t
their faith in the existence of Santa, but
the belief slipped to less than 50 per cent
among the 7 and 8s.
From 9 up, a Hallmark survey
showed, the doubts grew stronger, with
only about 10 per cent of the 10-to-
12-year-olds still getting a tingle out of
Kris Kringle.

Of

!:MORE NEW WAVE ROCK!!!
" JOHNNY THUNDERS " WAYNE KRAMER *
GANG WAR
9pm SATURDAY, FEB. 9 $5
VFW HALL-314 E. LIBERTY
ANN ARBOR'S REAL ROCK AND ROLL NIGHT CLUB

- ii.,.. . I . ' id29.... ., !.%// i: '"' -.,. ' m

ARMIN!%i

I

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