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February 08, 1980 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-02-08

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, February 8, 1980-Page 5

Students will count in census

GET HAPPY

SAVE $$$

By LEE KATTERMAN
As Census Day-April 1, 1980-
proaches, a small army of people will
recruited to attack the problems of
getting an accurate head count of the
area's residents""
The army headhunters, according to
Mikke Berla, census manager for the
Ann Arbor district, will be payng a
great deal more attention to students
residing in the area.
THE 1970 CENSUS marked the first
time college students were counted as
sidents of the locality where they
tended school Berla said some.
students were probably not counted
then because the school year ended
before census workers, called
"enumerators," could contact those
who had not yet returned their census
questionnaire.
This time around, Berla said the
census takers will go into areas where
students generally reside first, in the
hopes of catching the students before
they leave town for the summer. He
so said a publicity campaign is
planned to let people know about the
census and the need for returning
completed forms on time.
If you're wondering why this
traditional effort is being put into
counting students, consider the impact
of census data.
WHILE THE Constitution cites
legislative apportionment to justify the

1980 Census determines
federal funds for city

country's decennial census, federal
programs instituted since 1970 have
added new significance to this year's
national head count.
Simply put, it means money. General
Revenue Sharing, Community
Development Block Grants, and the
Comprehensive Employment Training
Act have all started since the 1970
census, and all rely on census data to
provide a basis for distributing funds to
state and local governments. ,
The City of Ann Arbor will receive
over $5 million during the current fiscal
year from the above mentioned federal
sources. In addition, the state
government returns close to $4 million
annually to the city as its population-
based share of state sales, income and
small business taxes.
ANOTHER CHANGE that may help
to get more students counted is new
wording the Census Bureau is using
to make questions apply to a wider
variety of living situations.
In the past, each person living at one
address was asked to give their
relationship to the household "head."
Fred Bohl, information system
manager for the Ann Arbor Planning

Dept., noted that for the usual family,
this designation would probably be
clear. But for a group of unrelated
students living under one roof, the
questions would be ambiguous, he said.
The 1980 Census form asks all those
residing at the same address to choose
a "reference person." The remaining
residents then check off- a box on the
form to describe their relationship to
this reference, with roommate being
offered as a choice for the first time.
WHILE THE entire U.S. population
will certainly have grown since 1970,
Steve Hendel, Ann Arbor's deputy
controller, said that relative growth is
the key to keeping funds coming to Ann
Arbor. As long as the city's population
grows as much or more as the entire
state, and barring any changes in the
legislation authorizing these programs,
Hendel said the current funding levels
will be maintained.
Beside determining how much
federal and state money will go to
various governments, census data will
be used to reassign Congressional
representation and re-draw district

boundaries. However, it won't be until a
year after Census Day, April 1, 1981,
that population totals will be complete
and the job of redrawing boundaries
can begin.
Estimates by the Census Bureau
indicate Michigan will lose one, and
possibly, two Congressional
representatives after the 1980 data is
compiled. It currently has 19 members
in the House of Representatives.
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Ureek-Americans, Dems
fund 2nd Ward primary

AN EENING With PETE SEEGER

(Continued from Page 1)
seek a second council term.
Of the four primary candidates in the
Fifth Ward, only two, Joyce
Chesbrough and William Gudenau,
APorted contributions exceeding $500.
andidates A. J. LaLonde and Lou
Velker have apparently decided not to
spend more than $500 before the
primary and, according to state law,
are not required to file a breakdown of
campaign contributions.
STEPHANOPOULOS acknowledged
yesterday that she had targeted the
Greek-American community in Ann
Arbor for campaign contributions. Of
e $1,100 her campaign has received in
ntributions so far, at least $300 came
from Greek-Americans.
Many of the donors come from
Stephanopoulos' home town of
Cleveland. But several local Greek-
Americans donated $25 to $50 to the
campaign.
Aside from a small group of law
students who are active Democrats,
students have not contributed to
Stephanopoulos' campaign. "They give
'ork, I'm not asking them for money,"
e said yesterday.
STEPHANOPOULOS has proposed a
rent control ordinance that would tie
rent increases to increases in the cost of
living. She has also favored removing
some of the mayor's power to nominate
members of city boards and com-
missions, and longer hours for city
buses.
Her opponent Greene has received
some $805, mostly from "long-time
mocrats and supporters," he said
esterday. Greene also has loaned his
campaign $300 from his own pocket.
Greene has advocated the establish-
ment of a Downtown Development
Authority to encourage construction of
housing in the city's downtown, tenant
safety ordinances, one of which he in-
troduced and pushed through council
recently, and increased police protec-
tion.
AMONG GREENE'S supporters;
nating from $10 to $50 were former,
niversity Dean of Education Wilbur.
Cohen, former Ann Abor City Council.
" pmember Eunice Burns, and Robert An-
derson, president of the Travers Lakes
Homeowner's Association,- a city
neighborhood organization.
In addition, the list of contributors to
Greene's campaign includes active
Democrats in the Second Ward.
Greene has spent nearly all the
q oney in his campaign fund, while
tephanopoulos has saved nearly half
her war chest.
IN THE Fifth Ward, Gudenau clearly
outpaced his major opponent,
Chesbrough, in terms of fundraising.
He reported contributions totaling
$4,390, while Chesbrough raised $1,280.
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE
PROGR AM presents
FACETSPERFORMANCE
ENSEMBLE'S
DARK
E

Gudenau has spent twice as muth.as
Chesbrough so far about $1,800 com-
pared to about $700 spent by
Chesbrough.
General Manager of both Holiday In-
ns in Ann Arbor, Gudenau's donors in-
clude several realtors, contractors,
developers, attorneys and bankers,
most of whom are personal friends, he
said yesterday.
Chesbrough could not be reached for
comment on her contributions to her
campaign last night.

Friday
Feb. 8
8M00p.m.
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Auditorium
Jefferson
at
Woodward,
Detroit

Ackets
18.00 S '5.00
Available at:
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Records
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