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February 08, 1980 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-02-08

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, February 8, 1980-Page 3

STUDENT GOVERNMENTS SUPPORT PUBLICATION

Coalition to push for evaluations

By MITCH STUART
The Intercollege Student Gover-
ment Coalition (ICSGC), in its first
:meeting this term, informally resolved
3ast night to go ahead with plans to im-
plement a University-wide course and
faculty evaluation program. Chairman
-Marc Breakstone said the key to IC-
SGC's plans is making the evaluations
"by and for students."
The proposed evaluation program
would be sponsored by the Michigan
tudent Assembly (MSA). The infor-
ation gathered through the program
would be published by MSA also.
BREAKSTONE, Academic Affairs
Coordinator for MSA, said the
Coalition's main concern last term was
a "lack of student participation in
decision-making at the University."
Sarah Jones, representative on the
Student Policy Advisory Committee of
the School of Natural Resources, said
her school is already looking into im-
rovin existing evaluation procedures.
4he added, however,,hat she could see
the benefits of a centralized evaluation
program.
Breakstone said, "Almost every
major university has it (an evalutaion
program) except us. It's really a sin
that this University has nothing like
that."
HE SAID filling out evaluations is
considered futile by many students,
since many times they never see the
esults. "There would be much more
responsible evaluation if students knew
the information would be coming back
to them," he said.
Dan Soloman, president of the LSA-
Student Government, said that
requesting all colleges release current

.+

evaluation information (when
available) would be a big first step for
the group. "We should take what we
have and start an organization with
that," he said. Soloman added that
publishing such information would
spark student concern and par-
ticipation.
Breakstone admitted that such
distribution would be valuable, but said
the group's ultimate goal is to "even-
tually develop a program for Univer-
sity-wide course evaluation."
HE SAID the major advantages to
such a program would be that all the in-
formation would be centralized for
student use, and some of tthe published
information would be subjective, rather
than simply percentages or ratings.
Breakstone said he hopes to keep the
evaluation on a voluntary basis for
faculty - he said nothing would be
published about individual courses or
faculty members without their per-
mission.
Sahba laal, president of the Architec-
ture Student Caucus, said he agreed
that an evaluation program would be
useful to students in all colleges. He ad-
ded, however, there is another concern
of Architecture students.
"WHAT IS really concerning Ar-
chitecture students right now is the
programming," Sahba said. He said the
major reason he would support an
evaluation program would be as a
logical step toward a change to a more
design-oriented program for the school.
Caroll McGill, president of the
Engineering Council, said she also sup-
ports a University-wide evaluation
program.
Breakstone said that establishing

such a program would be difficult. "In
order to ensure continuity you need
student support and knowledge. To get
student support, you need an effective
survey. It's a vicious circle," he said.
He baid he sees three purposes to
course evaluations:
" Providing feedback to instructors;

" Helping administrators with
promotion and tenure decisions, and
* Helping students choose courses
and instructors.
"The third is my basic goal,"
Breakstone said. He added, though that
ICSGC would have to be careful: "At
this stage of the game we can't be real
buccaneer about this."

SUNDA YAFTERNON ATTHELOFT
Flute and Classical Guitar
with
NANCY WARING and MICHAEL CASHER
February 10th at 4 p.m.
CANTERBURY LOFT
332 S. STATE ST.

A

1i

A

RD4

L

I

FILMS

School of Public Health-Noontime Film Fest, Are You Ready for Sex?,
Old Enough to Know, 12:10 p.m., School of Public Health Aud. II.
Ann Arbor Film Co-op-The Bride Wore Black, 7 p.m., Farenheit 451, 9
p.m., Modern Languages Building Aud. 3.
Alternative Action Film Series-Silent Running, 7,9 p.m., MLB Aud. 4.
Cinema Guild-El Super, 7, 9:05 p.m., Old Architecture Aud (Lorch
Hall).
Cinema Two-Each Dawn I Die, 7, 9:45 p.m., I Am A Fugitive from a
Chain Gang, 8:30 p.m., Angell Hall Aud. A.
Mediatrics-The Producers, 7, 10:30 p.m., The Twelve Chairs, 8:45 p.m.,
Natural Science Aud.
Gargoyle Films-Fists of Fury, 7:07, 9:09 p.m., 100 Hutchins Hall.
Oxford Co-op-Bilddokumente, 8 p.m., Max Kade House, Oxford Coop.
SPEAKERS
Undergraduate Political Science Association -brown bag lunch, Thomas
Mann, director of Congressional internships, "Careers in Washington,"
noon, Rackham Building West Conference Room.
Guild House-luncheon, Dr. Judith Kerman, U-M administrator,
"Dreams, Art,.and Dream-Art," noon, 802 Monroe.
Department of Medical Care Organization-Eser Uzun, "A Systems Ap-
proach to Interorganizational Relationships: The Concept of Affiliation,"
noon, 3001 Vaughan Building.
Resource Policy and Management-Constance Boris, "Symbolic
Budgeting and Executive Discretion in Environmental Policy Implemen-
tation," noon, 1028 Dana Building.
Center for South and Southeast Asian Studies-Madhav Despande, 'Peter
Hook and Ridney Moag, "Observations of the January Indian Elections,"
noon, Lane Hall Commons Room.
School of Metaphysics-"Metaphysics: New Thought for Skeptics," 7:30
p.m., 2191/2 N. Main St.
U.S.-China People's Friendship Association-Marie Leaner, "China from
a Worker's Perspective: The Experiences of an American Woman," 8 p.m.,
Michigan Union Kuenzel Room.
Intervarsity Christian Fellowship-Dr. James Packer (Regent's College,
British Columbia), "The Solution is Not Us," 8 p.m., Michigan League
Ballroom.
Pendleton Arts Information Center-James Cindin, "Dickens: Our Mutual
Friend,"8 p.m., Pendleton Arts Center, second floor, Michigan Union.
MEETINGS
Department of Political Science-meeting on non-traditional career
possibilities fir Ph.D.'s in Political Science, 3-5 p.m., Rackham Building
West Conference Room.
PERFORMANCES
Minority Arts and Cultural Festival-Gospel Choirs, 7 p.m., East Quad.
Aud.
PTP Best of Broadway Series-"Eubie! ", 8 p.m., Power Center.
Canterbury Loft-"Fantastic Space Voyage," multi-media, 8 p.m., 332 S.
State.
Department of Theater and Drama-"End of Summer," 8 p.m., Trueblood
Theatre, Frieze Building.
School of Music-University Symphony Band, 8 p.m., Hill Aud.
Department of Dance-Le Groupe Nouvelle Aire, 8 p.m., Dance Depar-
tment Studio Theater.
School of Music-Voice recital, Uzee Brown, Jr., 8 p.m., Recital Hall.
Dance Theatre II-program of dances, 8 p.., 711 N. University.
Eclipse Jazz-Weather Report, 8, 11 p.m., Michigan Theater, 603 E. Liber-
ty.
University Musical Society-Orpheus Ensemble, 8:30 p.m., Rackham
Aud.
Ark-Jean Redpath, Scottish ballads, 9 p.m., 1421 Hill St.
MISCELLANEOUS
International Center-Community Agency Tour: Focus on Youth, 2:30-5
p.m. Transportation available from the International Center.

SAVE! HUNDREDS OF AUDIO COMPONENTS ARE
SPECIALLY LOW PRICED 10 AM TO 9 PM

THESE ARE JUST A FEW OF THE MANY "SATURDAY ONLY" BARGAINS:

PIONEER SX-680 AM/FM
30 WATT STEREO RECEIVER
30 W/channel min. RMS 8 ohms,
20-20,000 Hz with no more than
0.17% THD. LED function indica-
tors. Walnut grain. Regular $229.
149
300 units chainwide

BLACK FACE
SANSUI INTEGRATED
STEREO AMPLIFIER
25 w/chan., min. RMS 8 ohms, 20-
20,000 Hz with no more than 0.17%
THD. Black face. Rack mountable.
Handles. AU11711. Reg. $149.88.

W_..T H DO Y
THREE-HEAD CASSETTE
TAPE DECK WITH DOLBY
Front load cassette deck with
microprocessor control, 3-head
design. 4 position tape select.
Removable door. Reg. $439.88.
$45

UNDER-
DASH

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is ::;5:: :: ....
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a '

PIONEER CAR STEREO DELUXE THREE-WAY
8-TRACK FM STEREO CAR SPEAKER SYSTEM
Supertuner FM stereo muting. Designed for use with biamplifi-
Automatic or manual program cation systems. Adaptable for con-
select. Fast forward. Program ventional use. Woofer, mid-range
repeat. TP-900. Regular $159. & tweeter. 6x9 grille. REg. $59.88
$99sPR.
limit 1 to customer

WItQDLBY

PIONEER SEMI-AUTO.
BELT-DRIVE TURNTABLE.
Automatic return. Strobe control.
Pitch control. Servo control DC
motor. Quick-start convenience.
Base & cover. PL516. Reg. $12148
.$8

TECHNICS DIRECT DRIVE
MANUAL TURNTABLE
B-FG servo control motor. Variable
pitch control. Built-in strobescope.
2-way cueing. 150 chainwide.
Base & cover. SL-D1. Reg. $118.88.
*69

JBL L-19 TWO-WAY
SPEAKER SYSTEM
High performance 2-way speaker
system. 8" woofer, 1/2" tweeter.
Hand-rubbed black walnut enclo-
sure. Model L19. Regular $148.

SANKYO FRONT-LOADING
CASSETTE WITH DOLBY
Total automatic shut-off. Record
level control. Twin VU meters.
Pause. 3 digit tape counter. Tape
select Model STD1700. Reg. $129
250 units chainwide

ADC SOUND SHAPER I
FREQUENCY EQUALIZER
Five'-band per channel equalizer
with sliding controls. Shapes
your music to suit your tastes.
100 chainwide. SS1. Reg. $99.88
$71

$112

EA.

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