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February 08, 1980 - Image 2

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-02-08

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01

U@Eopen
"9' House.
U -0
e Make an investment in your future. Look into the
Moster of Business Administration program of Ooklond a
University designed specifically for the nonmonoge-"
" ~ment, nonbusiness administration mt or- "
Friday, February 15, 1980
1:00 p.ma. to 5:00 p.m. '
272 West Vandenberg Hall
n School of Economics and Management
rOakland UniversityU
Rochester, Michigan 48063
j For further information, call (313) 377-3287.
....... .... ..............." """ e!!"!".. '.j
-PR ESEN TS t
Ope
Hard to believe that two tough guys like JAMES CAGNEY
and PAUL MUNI would end up taking the rap. Well, seizing
is believing. "it took these films to prove to me that Cops
*. 0
aren't always rght. i-Frank Rizzo
E ACH DAWN I DIE
William Keighly, 1939
CAGNEY as an enterprising cub reporter on the verge of exposing wide-
spread political corruption. The Politicos see what's in the offing and set
a bear trap for the young cub. Cagney is,convicted and sent to prison to
stew with hard core creepys like (GEORGE) RAFT and (MAXIE) ROSEN-
BLOOM. There he sees his ideals of justice disintegrate at the hands of a
patently corrupt system. At that point, there's only one destination for a
tough guy like Jimmy . .. The Hole. Cagney gives one of his best per-
formances in this film wrought with pathos, anxiety, and good camp-fun.
7:00 & 9:45
SAM A FUGITIVE
FROM A CH AIN ,GANG
Mervyn LeRoy, 1932
Based on the true story of Jimn Allen, a World WarA hero who returns to
the U.S. to find nothing but unemployment. Unable to find work, he takes
to the street as an indigent, but honest drifter. To add insult to injury he
gets implicated in a hot dog stand hold-up and is sentenced to the in-
famous Georgia Chain gang. Being a character of high intellectual
ability, he sogn tires of this life and decides to escape to the North. There,
under on alias, he becomes a world famous engineer and the toast of
Chicago society.W h e decides to dump his girl for a classier dme
she turns him in and Paul Muni ends up much like his buddy Cagney.
IS THERE NO JUSTICE!? 8:30 onD

Page 2-Friday, February 8, 1980-The Michigan Daily
Carter will call for
registration of women
(Continued from Page 1)

dications that a proposal to register
women would be controversial on
Capitol Hill. Most members of the
House and Senate Armed Services
Committees, which would consider the
proposal initially, have said they favor
registration of men only.:They contend
that since the military needs persons to
fill combat positions, registration of
women is unnecessary.
Women's groups have split on the

issue. Many oppose registration of
either sex, but say women must be in-
cluded if such a program is begun.
Other women's leaders have flatly op-
posed registration in any form.
O'Neill said yesterday that he toldi the
president earlier this week at a leader-
ship meeting that "he will have a rocky
road ahead if he recommends
registering women."

Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press international reports

Daily Official Bulletin

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 8,1980
Daily Calendar:
Guild House: Soup and sandwich.75tluncheon, Dr.
Judith Kerman, "Dreams, Art and Dream-Art," 802
Monroe, noon.
CSSEAS: Madhav M. Deshpande, Peter E. Hook
and Rodney F. Moag, "Observations of the January
Indian Elections," Lane Commons, noog.'
Medical Care Organization: Eser Uzun, "A
Systems Approach to Interorganizational Relation-
ships: The Concept of Affiliation," 3001 VV, noon.
Resource Policy and Management: Constance
Boris, "Symbolic Budgeting and Executive
Discretion in Environmental Policy Implemen-
tation," 102 Dana, noon.
Physics/Astronomy: G. Coleman, "Identification
of Absorption Lines in High Redshift Quasars," 807
Dennison, 4 p.m.
CAREER PLANNING & PLACEMENT
3200 SAB
INTERNSHIPS
The Oakland Press, Pontiac, MI, Advertising and
marketing internships with local newspaper. Must
have completed junior year with curseowrk or ex-
perience in advertising or marketing. Sign up now
for on-campus interviews on Monday, Feb. 11.

Federal Summer Internship Program. Highly
competitive internships for graduate students and
very highly qualified upperclassmen. Includes
positions in life sciences, physical sciences, social
sciences, business administration, computer scien-
ce, statistics, mathematics, engineering, urban
planning, etc. Come to 3200 SAB for details and ap-
plication forms.
FEDERAL SUMMER JOBS
Announcement No. 414. Summer jobs with the
federal government in a variety of fields. Highly
competitive. Apply early. Come to 3200 SAB for
details and application materials.
CAMP JOBS
Camp Tanuga, Kalkaska, MI. All types of camp
positions. On-campus interviews on Monday, Feb. 11.
Sign up now.
Camp Tamarack, Ortonville and Brighton, MI. All
types of camp positions. On-campus interviews on
Thursday, Feb. 21. Sign up beginning Tuesday, Feb.
12.
Camp Sequoia, Adrian, MI. Needs counselors with
one of the following skills: arts & crafts, WSI,
western riding, archery & riflery, nature lore,
cooking. On-campus interviews on Thursday, Feb.
21. Sign up beginning Tuesday, Feb. 12.
Sign up at 3529 SAB or call 764-7456 any day except
Tuesday.

Bruce tee

Chrysler loss largest ever
DETROIT-Chrysler Corp. yesterday reported the largest annual loss
in U.S. corporate history-$1.09 billion-as it annoucned a quarterly loss of
$375.8 million.
Chrysler officials said they see no immediate improvements in their
bleak economic picture, although they hope sales of 1981 models will bring a
return to profitability.
Case against Harrison
among FBI's strongest
WASHINGTON-The federal case agaisnt Sen. Harrison Williams Jr.
(D-N.J.) was said yesterday to be among the strongest in the FBI's political
bribery investigation which has implicated eight members of Congress,
according to Washington Star and New York.Daily News reports.
Williams is reported to have told FBI agents on videotape that Joseph
Lordi, chairman of the casino commission, helped him save $3 million for
developers of the Ritz hotel casino project in Atlantic City.
Bundy found guilty again
ORLAND, Fla.-Theodore Bundy, already facing the electric chair
for killing two Florida State University coeds, was found guilty yesterday of
a third slaying in the abduction and murder of 12-year-old school girl
Kimberly Diane Leach.
A five-man, seven-woman circuit court jury deliberated seven-and-a-
half hours before returning the guilty verdicts against Bundy, 33. Both carry
a maximum sentence of death in the electric chair. Sentencing will be set
tomorrow.
More allegations
against Miller
WASHINGTON-While Treasury Secretary G. William Miller was
board chairman of Textron Inc.,- company officials destroyed records
describing how $490,000 was spent to entertain Defense' Department
officials, according to a Securities and Exchange Commission staff report.
In other developments, a bill was introduced into the Senate to allow
Congress to decide whether allegations of official corruption warrant
independent investigation.
Ford rejected
Pinto modifications
WINAMAC, Ind.-Ford Motor Co. refused to spend $6.65 per car to
improve its 1973 Pintos' ability to withstand rear end collisions, a former
Ford official testified yesterday at the auto firm's reckless homocide trial.
He said Ford executives rejected a plan to modify the Pintos in an April
22, 1971 meeting because of the cost and the effect it would have on
profitability.
Carter fights FTC, water bills
WASHINGTON-President Carter said yesterday that he will veto any
legislation aimed at crippling the ability of the Federal Trade Commission
(FTC) to protect consumers and vowed to fight a bill passed by the House on
Tuesday to authorize $4.2 billion in dams and other water projects around
the nation.
Carter said the FTC is essential in guaranteeing truth, integrity, and
competition in the marketplace and that the water resources bill is
inflationary legislation,

4

0

11

..1

0

01

Friday, Feb. 8
7:07, 9:09
LAW SCHOOL
(Corner of Monroe & State)
A Gargoyle Film Presentation

..

Angell Hall

$1.50 one show, $2.50 both shows

-at

Tomorrow; THE MAN WHO FELL TO EARTH

1<

I e T

0

Nate Lang, Senior Manufacturing Development Engineer
"We are one ofthe most automated,computer
controlled,silicon growers inthe world.

"One operation is capable of monitoring 25
crystal growers. By 1982 we will be develop-
ing crystals with melt sizes up to 38,000
grams... . That's what I like about Delco
Electronics. We are doing things in a very
big way, but it's still a very relaxed atmo-
sphere that encourages creative thinking.
You have an opportunity to learn and under-
stand different technologies and to work
in a lot of different areas. I have been
here seven years and I've worked in the
metallurgy laboratory, the SEM laboratory
process area, the metallization area, wet
chemical process and the crystal growing
area. It's nice to know that you're working
for a company that offers so many different

opportunities and a competitive spirit that
breeds success. We work on tomorrow's
world every day at Delco Electronics. It's
exciting. Come to Kokomo and see why ...
the future is ... Delco Electronics."
we will be on campus
to meet
Electrical Engineers, Chemical
Engineers, Mechanical Engineers
and Industrial Engineers.

elle 3ichi1an' Jail
(USPS 344-900)
Volume XC, No. 106
Friday, February 8, 1980
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109.
Subscription rates: $12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail
outside Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday
mornings. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7 by mail outside Ann
Arbor. Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109.
The Michigan Doily Is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to United Press International,
Pacific News Service, Los Angeles Times Syndicate, and Field Newspaper Syndicate.
News room: (313) 764-0552, 76-DAILY: Sports desk: 764-0562; Circulation: 764-0558; Classified advertising:
764-0557; Displdy advertising: 764-0554: Billing: 764-0550: Composing Room: 764-0556.

I

Editor-in-Chief,...................MARK PARRENT
Mannging Editor...................MITCH CANTOR
City Editor....................PATRICIA HAGEN
University Editor..................(TOMAS MIRGA
Editorial Directors................. JOSHUA PECK
HOWARD WITT
Magazine Editors................ELISA ISAACSON
R.J. SMITH
Arts Editors......................MARK COLEMAN
DENNIS HARVEY
Sports Editor...................... GEOFF LARCOM
Executive Sports Editor........... : ..... BILLY SAHN
Managing Sports Editors................. BILLY NEFF

Business Manager.........ROSEMARY WICKOWSKI
Soles Manager....................DANIEL WOODS
Operations Manager.. ,..... ;... KATHLEEN CULVER,
Display ManagerN.............KRISTINAPETERSON
Classified Manager................SUSAN KLING
Nationals Manager........... ROBERT THOMPSON
Finance Manager.............. . .GREGG HADDAD
Circulation Manager ................ JAMES PICKETT
Ad Coordinator..................PETE PETERSEN
BUSINESS STAFF: Patrica Barron, Joseph Broda,
Courtney Casteel, Randi Cigelink, Donna Drebin,
Maxwell Ellis, Aida Eisenstot, Martin Feldman, Bar-

Delco
Electronics

I

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