100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 29, 1980 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-01-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

2~'~P~

Page 10-Tuesday, January 29, 1980-The Michigan Daily
SOPHOMORE LEADS WOMEN CAGERS
Dietz an all-around roundballer

BY MARK FISCHER
and DOUG NEARY
Opposing teams have been able to
stop the Michigan women's basketball
team this season, but they have had
trouble stopping Diane Dietz.
Dietz, only a sophomore, is currently
leading the 4-13 women cagers in
scoring for the second year in a row,
with an average of 18 points per game.
In a tough 78-71 loss to Indiana just two
weeks ago, she poured in a career high
31 points.
Despite her scoring prowess, Dietz is
by no means merely a shooter. For one
thing, she has proved to be a tiger on
defense.
"Diane plays both ends of the court
well," said head coach Gloria Soluk.
Dietz herself admits that after a game
she checks her steals, not her point
total.
"POINTS WILL come," said the 5'8"
southpaw. "The way we run our offen-
se, Abby (Currier) and I are going to
score. But I've been working mainly on
my defense since the summer, with a
lot of help from Coach Soluk."
Aside from her sharp offensive and
defensive skills, Dietz is blessed with
SKIERS
* Group Accommodations
(20 or more) at Camp
Sea-Gull in the heart of
Boyne Country
+ $28 per person/per
weekend includes:
-2 NIGHTS LODGING
--2 BREAKFASTS, DINNER
2 NIGHTLY SNACKS
-LARGE SKIERS LODGE WITH T.V.
LOUNGE
-MINUTES TO BOYNE HIGHLANDS,
BOYNE MT., NUBS NOB
-MILES OF CROSS-COUNTRY SKI
TRAILS
CALL 313-661-0060

two less tangible talents - intblligent:-
and leadership. In just her second year
on the team, Dietz was elected co-
captain and is the floor leader of the
squad.
"Diane is a very heady player,"
Soluk said. "She knows what to do and
when to do it."

THE COMBINATION of all these
skills gives Dietz a good shot at
becoming an All-American before she
graduates. But, in her coach's Words,
"she's got to dedicate both off-seasons
to ballhandling" if she is to.achieve this
goal.
Despite her potential, Dietz has no
aspirations to play pro ball. "I'd ratler
find another career," she said. "The
WBL (Women's Basketball League) is
a minor league - I don't think it would
be glamorous or fun."
Believe it or not, when Dietz was in
high school, she didn't even want to
play at the college level. However, con-
sidering the benefits she's received,
she's glad she did.
From a financial standpoint, the full .
scholarship Dietz was awarded by
Michigan doesn't hurt. The Orchard
Lake native received five or six similar
'full ride' offers, but narrowed her
choices down to Michigan State and the
U of M, as she wanted to stay in state.
DIETZ CHOSE Michigan for its
academic superiority, and, doesn't
regret it. "I love this school," she said.

"I've gotten to know lots of new
people." Those new people include
members of the men's basketball
team. In fact, both Steve Grote and
Mark Lozier directed her to her present
field of study, communications.
Her current 3.5 g.p.a. in this field at-
tests to her statement that "It's school
I'm mainly interested in." The time she
spends on basketball forces her to
discipline her daily life, yet to her,
"basketball is not work, but lots of
fun."
One thing Dietz hasn't found so fun
this year is her team's losses.
"IT'S FRUSTRATING, because we
have enough talent to win," she said.
"But we always seem to play down to
poor opponents and end up losing by
only a couple points.
"I'm really optimistic, though. I still
think we have a good chance to do bet-
ter than last year," Dietz added.
Perhaps it is this ever present op-
timism that prompts Coach Soluk to
call Dietz "the kind of player that
makes every coach glad they're
coaching."

Dietz
... highest scorer

SEASON HIGH SCORE M4RKS MEET:

1
1

7U

Blue
BY DAN E
The element of su
and the men's gymn
successfully Sunday
Minnesota off guard
first Big Ten loss. Th
up with their seaso
Gophers, 266.0-262.25
In their last mee
City Invitational in
nesota placed fourth
of Michigan, which
most observers,

gymna/sts ambui
W lverines underdogs going into Sun-
CONLIN dy's Crisler Arena appearance.
rprise rarely fails After the defeat, Minnesota coach
astics team used it Fred Roethlisberger summed up his
,catching powerful surprise with: "Well, they were much
to hand them their better than we thought."
ie Wolverines came Michigan coach Newt Loken was
n high to stun the boisterous about his team's performan-
-" ce. "Boy, our all-arounders sure broke
ting - the Windy the sound barrier," said Loken. "All
November - Min- four scores over 50; that's fantastic.
i, four points ahead Chris Van Mierlo had a super day with
finished ninth. To all-time high all-around score of 52.00."
this made the Michigan got off to an early lead by
/ taking the first two spots in the floor
- -- -- exercise. Kevin McKee and captain
Jim Varilek put the initial scare into the
Gophers with identical scores of 9.55.
John Rieckhoff and Dorian Deaver
held off the Minnesota attack by cap-
turing first and second in pommel hor-
se, scoring 9.25 and 9.15 respectively.

h GophersP
The Michigan lead increased to two
full points as Van Mierlo and Darrell
Yee swept the top spots in the rings with
a pair of 9.25's. McKee's 9.6 in vaulting
and Marshall Garfield's 9.3 on the
parallel bars furthered the Michigan
cause, but Doug Zahour clinched the
upset with a 9.35, for another Wolverine
first place.
Even in victory, though, Loken hasn't
lost any respect for the Gophers. "Min-
nesota is much better than they showed
today," said Loken. "We'll have to
compete with them all over again in the
Big Ten Championship. The (past)
scores the Gophers have turned in
should make the Big Ten title a match
between Ohio State and Minnesota."
The Wolverines will have a chance to
test Loken's words next weekend when
they travel to Columbus to face the
Buckeyes.

H NEFF
p ENOUG"
°By Billy Neff
All that glitters.0 *
not always gold
A BOUT THIS TIME of year, names like Derek Harper, Steve Smith
and Tim McCormick inevitably pop up. Coaches cannot be reached
in their offices because they're off in Escanaba or Eloy, Arizona doing what
must be done.
What they're all doing, need you wonder, is recruiting-that age-old rite
that destroys even the calmest of coaches.
I have always wondered what sales pitch coaches give to these prospec-
ts, what attractions they are offered from each school. And finally, why do
players choose the colleges they do?
Is it the tradition of a school, the coach, the academic qualities, or sim-
ply the chance to be the star at a school?
Why would Mike Cade choose Michigan over Arizona? Cade ws one of
the two most highly sought after prep running backs in the nation last year.
Somehow, he landed in Ann Arbor from Eloy, Arizona.*
His statistics were incredible.,He rushed for 4,500 career yards in highs
chool, 2,235 his senior year. In the state championship game, he gained 299
yards and scored six touchdowns.
But why would he matriculate here, where he would have to compete
with Butch Woolfolk and Stanley Edwards? Why not go to Arizona and be the
star on a team that eventually went to the Fiesta Bowl?
"It's a good academic school. I thought I had a good chance to start or at
least play a lot," commented Cade on his decision to enroll here.
"It (Michigan) was more highly rated than Arizona (in football); that's
why I chose Michigan," concluded Cade.
So Cade is here and chances are that, at most, he will see limited playing
time the next couple of years since both Woolfolk and Edwards are just
sophomores in eligibility. Thus, he'll get a year or two of regular play,
probably much less than he would have received as an Arizona Wildcat.
Cade is but one example of someone who, in my estimation, chose the
wrong college. Take Clarence Tillman, for example.
Tillman was a first team high school All American basketball player out
of the perennial basketball factory at West Philadelphia High School. He
drew national attention with teammate Eugene Banks, eventually a star at
Duke, as their team was rated number one high school team in the nation,
three years running.
When it came to choosing a college, Tillman went for all the marbles.
Kentucky had been national champion and his playing style was comparable
to Kentucky's leading scorer, Jack "Goose" Givens. Tillman's thinking was,
'why not go there and fill this graduated star's shoes?'
Shoes already filled
The only problem was that Kentucky coach Joe B. Hall found four
players to fill Givens' shoes. His freshman year, Tillman was relegated to
third or fourth forward status and averaged a mere 3.3 points a game.
As things looked even bleaker this season, Tillman decided to transfer
to Rutgers, wheie he will be able to play. Who is going to make up for the two
years he has already missed-the one he spent mostly on the bench and the
one he has to sit out as a transfer?
His high school teammate, Banks, made a much wiser decision. He
chose a school, Duke, with a great academic tradition which was on its way
up in basketball. At the time, Duke was a virtual nobody but, with Banks'
acquisition, it made the national finals. In additin, he received ideal com-
petition in the Atlantica Coast Conference, where basketball is renowned.
In high school, Banks' and Tillman's toughest opponent was someone by
the name of Michael Brooks. He is another example of how important your
college choice is.
No one had heard of Brooks. Not many people recruited him. He chose
La Salle, a school rich in basketball tradition that was suffering thrpugh
hard times. It played a high quality schedule including Notre Dame, South
Carolina and DePaul.
Brooks labored in relative obscurity until last summer. He was chosen
for the Pan American team and led it to the gold medal. Everywhere he hasa
gone, he has drawn rave reviews. In a tournament at Brigham Young, he
tallied 51 points on 24-36 shooting, hitting 12 field goals consecutively. Now
every national magazine is doing stories on him and many scouts think he
will be one of the top five players selected in the NBA draft.
The point is that he picked a school both where he knew he'd be the star
and where it had a 'top-notch schedule. Thus, he will fulfill his lifelong
dream-playing in the NBA, big dollars.
Of course, it is ideal if a high school standout will choose a school where
he can get the best education. But that's about as realistic as hoping for the
Russians to cut down on nuclear armaments. Prospects yearn for the glitter
of national recognition.
Are you listening Tim McCormick? McCormick is the basketball star
who Michigan basketball coach Johnny Orr is pursuing hotly. Follow the
route of Banks and Brooks and choose a school where you can be the star and
also make sure this college plays in a strong conference.
You see, I don't want to read about another case like Tilman or Cade.

GET HAPPY
SAVE $$$

r

at
' '
-', :;/
" >
,
B cle
y ,
111

SPORETS []No TIIP

OPEN 7 DAYS
for Lunch & Dinner
Sun & Mon 'til 9 PM
Tues-Thurs 'til 11 PM
Fri & Sat 'til 1 AM
1301 S. University
665-2650

Men's Basketball
Jan. 31-at Wisconsin
Feb. 2-NORTHWESTERN
Women'sBasketball
Jan. 29-LOUISVILLE
Jan. 31-GRAND VALLEY
Feb. 2-NORTHWESTERN
Hockey
Feb. 1-2-at Denver

Men's Gymnastics
Feb. 2-at Ohio State
Women's Gymnastics
Feb. 2-at Ohio State
Men's Track
Feb. 2-at Western Michigan
Women's Track
Feb. 2-at Western Michigan
Men's Swimming
Feb. 1-NORTH CAROLINA STATE
Women's Swimming
Feb. 1-NORTH CAROLINA STATE
Wrestling
Jan. 31--at Iowa St.
Feb. 1-at Iowa
Feb. 2-at Minnesota

p

HAPPY HOUR
MON.-THURS. 8 PM 'til Close
Hamburgers $1.69 . .................SAVE 51C
French Fries 254 .......... .... .......SAVE 55C
Local Draft Beer Mug 504 ............... SAVE 20C
Pitcher $2.25... . ....SAVE 75C

Billiards
A Special!
rates reduqed
10 am to 6pni
every day
at the Union

Join The Daily
Sports Staff!

House Cocktails 99¢

....................SAVE 26C

___
__

{ , - - -

A
I-A

-_

i

I

U . r

i'

Engineering Graduates/Undergraduates
Apply Now
For Your Future!
GROW ALONG WITH
SUN PETROLEUM PRODUCTS
COMPANY
You've worked hard and mastered a technically com-
plex and mentally demanding science. Now you would
like to let all of that effort begin to pay off. Ideally, you,
seek a major corporation in the forefront of this
nation's economy. A company with a long tradition of
technical innovation and successful expansion. A con,
pany where YOUR creativity and achievements will be
recognized and rewarded.
LOOK NO FURTHER!
SUN PETROLEUM PRODUCTS COMPANY is a wholly
owned, independent subsidiary of SUN COMPANY,
INC. We are responsible for the efficient operation of
six petroleum refineries and the marketing of many.
petroleum-related products and technological services
to customers throughout the.world.
Engineers from our Professional staff will be on
your campus
Friday, February 8th
to discuss our company's tlans for your career in

ENGI

EERI

GRADUATES
For employment in Southern California
THE LONG BEACH NAVAL SHIPYARD
will be recruiting on your campus for civilian employment in:
Mechanical Engineers * Naval Architects
Civil Engineers & Architects Electrical/Electronic Engineers

I

Industrial Engineers
THE LONG BEACH NAVAL SHIPYARD
is looking for graduating engineers who:
Carl accept responsibility for multi-million
dollar projects.
Are creative in engineering analysis to
improve cost efficiency.
Can adapt to multi-engineering problems
with state of the art requirements.
Are self-motivating.

THE LONG BEACH NAVAL SHIPYARD
civilian employment offers:
Challenging career opportunities.
Constantly changing job assignments.
World travel.
Liberal vacation time.
High-paying retirement.
Merit promotion opportunities.

Sign up now at your placement office. We will be interviewing:
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 1980
if you cannot fit this into your busy schedule

W

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan