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January 22, 1980 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-01-22

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The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, January 22, 1980-Page 3
REINFORCEMENTS REPLACE DISAPPEARING TROOPS

The Sovi
scontinent
combat9
replacing
ting "like

Soviets send new forces to Afghanistan
By The Associated press airlifted in recent weeks into South ter, meanwhile, said former President was regarded as friendlier to Moscow. tified by name or nationalit
et Union has mounted a tran- Yemen, the only Marxist-governed Hafizullah Amin was overthrown in a Since then the Soviets have joined in the yesterday that the airlift hy
al airlift to pour fresh Soviet republic in the Arabian peninsula, Arab coup on Dec. 27 because he had been war against anti-communist Moslem going on for several days.
forces into Afghanistan, diplomatic sources here said yester- plotting with Moslem fanatics and the rebels. They said the new troops wer
local troops who are deser- day. CIA to end Marxist rule in Afghanistan. AMERICAN journalists expelled en flown in from bases in Eastern
so many disappearing soda In Washington, intelligence sources The minister, Sayed Golabzoi, masse from Afghanistan on Saturday and that they apparently wereI

y, said
d been
re being
Europe
to rein-

Shapiro
..questions undergrad. education
Sh a

bubbles," diplomatic sources in
Pakistan said yesterday.
U.S. Intelligence sources in
Washington estimated that Soviet dead,
wounded, captured and missing in the
war against anti-communist rebels
might now total 2,000.
MEANWHILE, SAUDI Arabia has
told the United States and Britain that
hundreds of Cuban soldiers and dozens
of Soviet generals and experts were

said they had no reports of any unusual
buildup of either Soviet or Cuban forces
in South Yemen.
Foreign journalists reported from the
Afghan capital of Kabul that Moscow.
has also sent in thousands of Soviet ad-
ministrators to take firm control of the
government, . whose communist
bureaucracy was hit hard by two years
of bloody in-fighting.
THE NEW AFGHAN interior minis-

speaking at a news conference, claimed
Amin had planned his power play for
Dec. 29, Associated Press Correspon-
dent Marcus Eliason reported from
Kabul. The new regime has claimed
repeatedly that Amin was a CIA agent.
The Soviet troops who began arriving
in Kabul in big numbers Dec. 25 helped
topple Amin two days later and
replaced him with Babrak Karmal.
Both men were Marxists, but Karmal

'What's happening is that, the Afghan army is
suffering such rapid desertions that the Soviets are
reaching the point where there will be no indigenous
forces to rely on.'
--a Western diplomat

v - a r r

unde rgrad Treadway

education
*in need
(Continued from Pagel1)
ferent University schools and colleges
'to make this issue one of their foremost
interests.
Although Shapiro contends he is
completely satisfied with the education
received by students graduating in- the
upper portion of their class, but said he
thinks those not enrolled in
"professional or quasi-professional
programs" may find it easier to do a
minimum of work.
"IF A PERSON is determined to pur-
sue the path of least resistance, he can
move around the University in paths
never thought of when the programs
were put together," he said.
0 "I want to be, and I want the Univer-
sity to. be proud of everyone we
graduate," Shapiro concluded.
"Perhaps we could do a little better in
the future."
Shapiro also addressed the research
environment at the University, an issue
which he said already has received
considerable faculty attention. The new
University president said he thinks it
will be "a very critical problem over
*the next ten years."
"It's become apparent to me ever
since I, became' Vice President for
Academic Affairs that there have to be
some changes. . . . Whatever sorts of
environments. suited us well in the past
are not likely to suit us well now," he,
said.
ACCORDING TO Shapiro, the ad-
ministration and faculty will have to
decide whether they want to put a large
part of their limited resources into
research, or whether it would be more
appropriate to build up other areas.
Recently, the University allocated ad-
ditional funds for research work in
schools and colleges, and increased
support of research assistants.

By JOHN GOYER,
A member of the city's human rights
advisory panel last night told City
Council that the panel questions the
process under which Personnel/Human
Rights Director Robert Treadway was
suspended from his job last week.
"Considering the brevity of his em-
ployment here," said Human Rights
Commission member Janice Caldwell,
"we question the internal process of
Treadway's suspension."
TREADWAY, WHO began as Per-
sonnel/Human Rights director in June
was suspended Jan. 14. Since then, he
has accepted a senior technician's job
in the personnel department at the
same $26,000 salary, after he hired an
attorney and threatened to fight the
suspension.
Earlier yesterday, Treadway told a
special meeting of the Human Rights
Commission that he was suspended
Jan. 14 only after he refused to resign.
He said he was asked to do "an
impossible job" due to insufficient
staff. Figures supplied by the Inter-
national City Managers Association
show that Ann Arbor, with 1,150 em-
ployees should have five staff members
in its personnel office, according to
City rejects
interchange
(continued from Page 1)
over "derelicts" loitering in public
places. State legislation in 1978
decriminalized public drunkenness and
police were authorized to take the
inebriated to a hospital rather than to
jail.
Mayor Louis Belcher said the or-
dinance will "give us the ability to
escort drunks back to their place of
abode (rather than to the hospital."
By making loitering a misdemeanor,
loitering and drunkenness problems on
State Street and during the Hash Bash
will be reduced, Belcher added.
"THIS ORDINANCE will not add
anything of value to the laws we
already have on the books," said Leslie
Morris (D-Second Ward).

suspension
Treadway. He had one and a half
working for him.
CALDWELL LAST night told, City
Council panel members are worried
that hiring and firing guidelines for City
Hall executives such as Treadway are
not clearly spelled out.
Council had not voted on accepting
Treadyvay's resignation at press time.
In Treadway's case, Caldwell said

questioned
the Human Rights Commission
questioned whether Treadway had suf-
ficient notice of his faults as Person-
nel/HumanRights director, and
adequate time to improve.
Yesterday, Treadway said he learned
Nov. 27 the city administration was un-
satisfied with his performance, when it
formally assessed his effectiveness.

reported seeing Soviet Antonov tran-
sport planes unloading fresh troops at
Kabul airport.
The sources in the Pakistani capital
of;Itfamabad, who asked not to be iden-

force - not replace - the Russian for+
ces already there. An estimated 76,000
to 80,000 tSoviet soldiers are id
Afghanistan.
SgeDESERTING, Page 6

igh Court rules poor
conditions don 't excuse
escaped prisoners
WASHINGTON (AP) - Escaped said such unrestricted activity "could
prisoners who do not quickly try to imperil discipline" but the dissenters
surrender cannot avoid punishment af- said the restriction violates the First
ter recapture by claiming they fled Amendment right to petition the gover-
from intolerable Jail conditions, the nment.
Supreme Court ruled yesterday. -REFUSED To approve the firing of
By a 6-2 vote,-the justices ruled that, an Alaska man whose religious beliefs
in the absence of surrender attempts, forbid him, to pay union dues. The
judges can block testimony about jail refusal marked the third time in a year
conditions in trials on escape charges. the court has refused to uphold a so-
IN A BUSY day on the bench before called "union shop" agreement over a
starting a four-week recess, the justices worker's claim of religious freedom.
also took these actions: -Cleared the way for court-ordered
-Ruled, in a pair of 5-3 votes, that racial balancing in Dallas public
members of the armed services cannot schools, a move that could mean the
circulate petitions" intended for busing of an additional 20,000 students
Congress without first getting approval in the nation's eighth-largest school
from their military superiors, district.
Justice Lewis Powell Jr.'s opinion

T B Ann Abor Film Coopsive Presents at Aud. A: $1.SO
Tuesday, January 22
(Akira Kurosawa) / RASHOM ON 7&10:20-AUD. A
A bandit (TOSHIRO MIFUNE), a samurai, and his wife each tell of a rape and
killing in which they were involved. The discrepancies in the four stories
indicate the mysterious quality of truth. The film puzzles the mind and disturbs
the psyche. "Rashomon is one of the greatest film experiences-a film one
will see again because theme are pleasures-as well as pain-in looking into
an abyss."-Pauline Kael. Academy Award for best foreign film. Grand Prize
in Venice. Japanese with English subtitles.
LAST YEAR AT MARIENBAD
(Alain Robbs-Grillet and Alain Resnais, 1961) 8:40-AUD. A
Three nameles characters meet in an enormous baroque hotel-obeautiful
woman, her male companion (possible her husband), and a stranger who
claims to be her lover. Did thewoman and the stranger make a pact of love
"last year at Marienbad" and plan to run away together? In this film, traditional
notions of plot and narration are thrown out the window: explanations are
replaced by juxtaposition of the past and present, memory and reality. The
result is a complex and fascinating film in which everything is possible, but
nothing is certain. Selected as best film at the 1961 Venice Film'Festival. French,
with English subtitles.sE
Tomorrow: Robert Bresson's DIARY OF A COUNTRY PRIEST at Aud. A. FREE

i

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For PIZZAs Sake.
SUBMARINES, & PIZZA
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663-0511

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To show you how,
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NOTICE TO
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am Bar
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0AW 0AA NA SPLI *
EGULAR PRICE $1.30)65
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d Tuesday, Jan. 22 through Friday, Jan. 25
Between 2 and 4 p.m
r all Students, Faculty, Staff-
CAFETERIA Open
.E LEAGUE 1:30 to
HE MICHIGAN LEAGUE 5:00 to 7:15
INGALLS LITTLE LEAGUE
BANANA SPLIT Open 7:15 to 4:00p.m.
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FILMS

Ip't 'ii

D

nn

Cinema Two-Alphaville, 3, 7, 9 p.m., MLB 3.
Ann Arbor Film Co-op Rashomon, 7, 10:20 pm., Last Year at Marienbad,
8:40 p.m., Aud. A, Angell.
PERFORMANCES
University Musical Society-Alfred Brendel, 8:30 p.m., Hill.
Union of Students for Israel-Ruthi Navon, 8:30 p.m., Pendleton Room,
Union.
SPEAKERS
Resources Policy and Management Program-Guntar Schramm, "Macro
and Micro Considerations in Irrigation Planning: Mexico," noon, 1028 Dana.
International Center Kwasi Oduonum, "African Musical Lecture/Demon-
stration," noon, International Center.
Center for Chinese Studies-Ruth Ecstein, "China Revisited-Without a
Red Carpet," noon, Lane Hall Commons.
Law School-Daniel Bell, The "Third" Revolution-and Its Consequences,
4 p.m., Rackham Amphitheatre.
Computing Center-Forrest Hartman, "The MYS File Editor-I" 7:30 p.m.,
Lecture Room 1, MLB.
Museum of Zoology-Barry O'Connor, "Evolutionary Aspects of the
Associations Between Astigmatid Mites and their Arthropod and Vertebrate
Hosts," 4 p.m., 1033 Kellogg Dentistry Institute.
Bioengineering-Denis Lee, "Recent Advances in Medical Sculpture," 4
p.m., 1042 E. Engineering.
Geology and Minerology-John W. Valley, "Fluid Flow in High Giade
Metamorphic Rocks," 4 p.m., 4001 C.C. Little.
Chemical Engineering-Brice Carnahan, "The Fortran IV Programming
Language-I," 7:30 p.m., Nat. Sci. Aud.
Michigan May Society-W. Graham Randles, "Explorers Maps of
Africa," 8 p.m., Clements Library.
Center for Afro-American Studies-Ronald Walters, "Black Americans
and the Domestic Political Agenda in the 1980s," noon, 115 Lorch Hall.
MEETINGS
Students for ERA-5 p.m., 4108 Union.
Michigan LS Society-7:30 p.m., Conference Rooms 4 and 5.
T Tnvprrcitv.T nnrhrnw .Acrnnnpr-_7'Ohn nm Qfl7T)Pnncan

0
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ONE WEEK ONLY !!! JANUARY 21- JANUARY 26
ONLY AT OUR NORTH CAMPUS BRANCH ......
ALL REFERENCE & TRADE BOOKS WILL BE

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