100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 10, 1976 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-08-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, August 10, 1976

Police ki two in 8, African clash

JUIIANNESHUiG;, South Af-
rica ' - Police shot and killed
two blacks yesterday in clashes
with hands of rampaging youths
in Alexandra and other black
townships around .ohannesburg.
The youths burned schools,
stoned vehicles and tried to stop
workers from getting to their
jobs.
The deaths were confirmed by
police.
ALL EXITS from Alexandra,
which borders white residential
areas in northern .Johannesburg,
were sealed by police road
blocks.
Violence also resumed after a
weekend lull in Soweto, the
largest segregated township of
more than one million blacks
located eight miles south of
Johannesburg.
Students have been demon-
strating and rioting in Soweto
since last Wednesday, when
they tried to march on down-
town Johannesburg to protest
the detention of student leaders

:ttr the widespread rioting in
black townships in June in which
I~S perrs ns were killed.
GENERAL dissatisfaction with
the government's apartheid pol-
icy and .specific grievances such
as lack of full black parliamen-
tary representation have been
cited as reasons for the vio-
lence.
Three persons were reported
killed by police gunfire last
week, and five others died in the
rioting, including a girl fatally
trampled by a stampeding mob.
All but one of those killed last
week were black.
Scores of police moved into
Alexandra on Monday to clear
away student barricades and dis-
perse crowds gathering in the
streets. In Soweto, students
burned several schools, threw
up roadblocks and stoned work-
ers commuting to Johannesburg.
Police firing tear gas fought
running battles with stone-throw-
ing youths in several scattered

districts.
"Blacks are taunting the
police and efforts are being
made to intimidate workers
wanting to leave the township,"
said Police Chief W.H. Motze.
Police said black workers at
a white-owned factory on the
border of Alexandra routed one
mob of youths who surrounded
the factory.
Brief rioting was also reported
at Mohlakeng township just east
of Johannesburg. A police
spokesman said some 600 stu-
dents began stoning a school to
keep other students from going
to classes and then the crowd
started smashing windows at
the local government office.
AN 1$-YEAR-OLD black boy
and a 15-year-old girl were
wounded by police who said
they were *forced to fire to
protect their lives. The girl's
condition was later described as
"fairly serious."
There have been signs in re-
cent days that South African
TIE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVI, No. 64-S
Tuesday, August 10, 1976,
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published d a il y Tuesday through
Sunday nisrning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48t09. Subscription
eaten: $i2 Sept. thruA prit2a""ses-
ters); $13 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann
Arbor; $7.50 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.

authorites are trying to dispel
any panic among the country's
white minority. Government of-
ficials, including Prime Minister
John Vorster promised to main-
tain law and order.
The U.S. consulate reported a
record number of queries in re-
cent months about emigration
to the United States.
"IF THERE are grievances,
the door is open to hear those
grievances, but the government
will certainly not be railroaded
into panic action," Vorster said

in a magazine being published
today.
Vorster's comments were his
first since he said June 18 that
police should use "all available
means" to restore order in So-
weto.
Other ministers have also in-
dicated the government will lis-
ten to black grievances behind
the riots. M.C. Botha, minister
of Bantu (African) administra-
tion, promised a "new deal" for
urban blacks but gave no de-
tails.

Television viewing tonight

THE SOUND

VAULTmxe.
For professional recordings
.. at home.

Every Maxell tape gives you the very
best sounds (both high and low) your
equipment can produce. For secure tape
recordings use Maxell tape.
lU-Ft BUYS
618 S. MAIN ST. free
769-4700 Parking
...

6:00 2 7 11 13 NEWS
9 I DREAM OF JEANNIE
20 CISCO KID
30 ZOOM
50 BRADY BUNCH
62 I SPY
6:301 4 13 NBC EWS
9 NEWSDAY
I1 CBS NEWS
20 DANIEL BOONE
30 HODGEPODGE LODGE
50 I LOVE LUCY
7:00 2 CBS NEWS
4 BOWLING FOR DOLLARS
7 ABC NEWS
9 ANDY GFIFFITII
11 FAMILY AFFAIR
13 HOGAN'S HEROES
30 ROBERT MacNEIL
REPORT
50 FAMILY AFFAIR
56 CONSUMER SURVIVAL
62 SPEAKING OF SPORTS
7:30 2 NAME THAT TUNE
4 GEORGE PIERROT
7 PRICE IS RIGHT
9 ROOM 222
11 DON ADAMS' SCREEN
TEST
13 ADAM-12
20 STUMP THESTARS
30 FIRING LINE
50 HOGAN'S HEROES
56 ROBERT MacNEIL
REPORT
62 NEWS
7:45 62 TEEN PROFILE
8:00 2 11 POPI
4 WORLD AT WAR
7 BAPPY DAYS
S ON THEDEVIDENCE-
Drama
13 MOVIN' ON
20 IT TAKES A THIEF
50 MERV GRIFFIN
56 AT THE TOP
62 MOVIE
"Casbah"
8:30 2 11 GOOD TIMES
7 LAVERNE & SHIRLEY

9:00 2 11 M*A*S*H
4 13 POLICE WOMAN
7 PILOT
9 CFL FOOTBALL
20 700 CLUB
30 MOVIE
50 MOVIE
"Prince Valiant"
56 RIVALS OF SHERLOCK
HOLMES
9:30 2 11 PPILOT
7 PILOT
10:00 2 11 SWITCH
4 13 CITY OF ANGELS
7 PILOT
56 MONTY PYTHON'S
FLYING CIRCUS
62 PTL CLUB
10:30 7 PILOT
20 PRACTICAL
CHIRISTIAN LIVING
56 MARK OF JAZZ
11:00 2 4 7 11 13 NEWS
20 ADVENTURES IN
PARADISE
50 BEST OF GROUCHO
56 IT'S YOUR TURN
11:30 MARY HARTMAN,
MARY HARTMAN
4 13 JOHNNY CARSON
7 MYSTERY OF THE WEEK
"The Spy Who Returned
ram the Dead"
9 CBC NEWS
11 MOVIE
"The Wings of Eagles."
50 MOVIE
'Pillow to Post."
56 ABC NEWS
11:50 NIGHTBEAT
12:00 2 MOVIE
62 NEWS
12:20 9 MOVIE
"Fluffy"
1:00 4 TOMORROW
7 13 NEWS
2:00 4 CLASSROOM
2:10 2 MOVIE
'Thunderbirds-"
2:30 4 NEWS
3:40 2 NEWS

UAW Local 2001-U of M CLERICALS

IT COULD I
Over 105 clericals huve filed grievances in the lIst 11 months, fighting back
against University abuses and violations of our contract. These continuous
violations confirm what we already know: in all important aspects of the
employment relationship, management's interests are fundamentally opposed
to our own. Without our Union, we would have no way to defend ourselves
against reckless management decisions to sacrifice clerical interests to their
own. We would be at the mercy of our supervisors. With our Union, we have
the collective strength and organization to stand up to management and
supervisors. We can defend ourselves effectively, since we take seriously the
position: an attack on one is an attack on all.
Without a Union and a contract, we give management the power to "settle"
disputes between their interests and ours. We know how they will "settle"
such disputes. Here is a partial list of management "settlements" of disputes
against which the Union is fighting. These and hundreds of other grievances,
now and in the future, would die without a Union.
RACISM All white supervisors in one department changed the duties of
a Block receptionist to those of a file clerk. They minutely scrutinized
her work in hopes that this harassment would cause her to leave the
office. Without a Union this clerical could not fight back.
31.1 % of disciplinary charges have been against minority clericals
while they comprise only 10.6% of the clerical workforce.
UNJUST DISCIPLINE AND HARASSMENT
A clerical in the hospital was threatened with disciplinary action,
including discharge, after becoming active in the Union. Following
a year of harassment, she was given a 2 day disciplinary layoff for
alleged "bad attitude" and a failure to perform her duties well.
A clerica with 6b1 years seniority was fired for alleged absenteeism.
Her resistance to viruses had been weakened by a chronic medical
condition, and she had too much public contact on her job. Instead
of aiding this worker in finding a job with less public contact, man-
agement denied her a transfer and set her up for the firing.
Another firing occurred when a Black clerical with ten years seniority
was accused of making long distance phone calls on the University
WATS Line. She had not made any long distance calls since six
months earlier, when she hod voluntarily paid for personal calls before

BE YOU!
she was told not to make them. She was targeted for this discharge
the day after she filed a grievance.
Without a Union, these clericals would have no defense.
REPLACING PERMANENT CLERICALS
Two permanent clerical jobs in an office were filled by temporaries,
who have no Union protection or benefits. This lessens the number
of clerical positions and trains non-clericals to carry out our jobs in
the event of a strike.
SPEEDUP A clerical was given a number of additional duties. No extra
staff was hired to help her, and she was expected to get everything
done-or else. This happens all the time at the University. Without
a Union, we have no way to fight back. Through our contract we can
define and defend job classifications and amount of work, so that
management cannot arbitrarily add duties.
RECLASSIFICATION
An employee was promoted from C-5 to C-6. Subsequently the
University unilaterally reclassified her position to a C-5.
Management reclassified four clericals in C-5 positions to C-4's
claiming that their duties had decreased, when, in fact, they were
performing new duties formerly done by P&A's.
Without a Union, these clericals would have to take what manage-
ment dished out.
in the past year, there have been over two dozen cases of disciplinary layoff
and discharge. Without a Union, an individual clerical would have little
chance of successfully challenging management's "rights' to carry out such
disciplinary actions. Every dispute over wages, benefits, evaluations, working
conditions, promotions, absenteeism, harassment, etc. would become an un-
equal conflict between a well-organized University management and on
isolated individual clerical.
Only by using our collective strength in our Union can we protect our jobs,
our wages, and our working conditions. The strength of the Union is the
membership, and the direction of the Union is determined democratically by
the membership. We must not throw away what we worked so long to achieve,
since, at present, our Union is our only tool for gaining control of our working
lives.

VOTE "YES" FOR UAW LOCAL 2001 IN THE AUGUST 5-11 DECERTIFICATION ELECTION!
OUR UNION WITH EACH OTHER IS OUR ONLY STRENGTH!
UAW LOCAL 2001 EDUCATION COMMITTEE HELEN KELLY, LISA NORTH, PAM O'CONNOR,
DOC WHITING, JO WILSMANN.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan