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August 07, 1976 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-08-07

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Page Four

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

_Saturday, August 7, 1976

Page Four THE MICHIGAN DAILY satur4ay, August 7, 1976

Crowd watches as youths beat boy

LONDON (UPI) - Ensrico Sidoli had
a nervous tic and his classmates taunt-
ed him with the nickname "Noddy,"
after a children's book character whose
head nodded back and forth.
The teen-ager lived in a fantasy world,
pretending to be a disc jockey, and he
talked incessantly. All this set him apart
and made him the butt of pokes at
school.
Three weeks ago Enrico went to a
public swimming pool where three
youths attacked him, beat him severely
and held him under water until he
stopped struggling.
Not one of the 1,000 persons at the
pool, including lifeguards, paid any at-

tention to his cries for help.
And now not one of them will come
forward to talk to Scotland Yard about
his slaying.
"There is a complete wall of silence
around this case," one Scotland Yard
source said. ,
Fifteen-year-old Enrico, who died 11
days after the attack, was buried
Wednesday. An older sister came from
Australia for the funeral. Other rela-
tives came from Italy. Scotland Yard
detectives sent a wreath.r
Another wreath at Enrico's funeral-
a teddy bear of white chrysanthemums
was from the students at school. But
none of those classmates, some of whom

witnessed Enrico's death, would talk
about what they lad seen.
"Some of our people talked to one
15-year-old girl and decided her parents
should be present," said Scotland Yard
'Detective 5Chief Inspector Harry Cle-
ment.
"When they went to her house the par-
ents pretended they were not home, then;
said the girl was not there, then said
she was sick and could not speak."
"We know there are people who saw
this killing of a helpless boy, and who
could identify the killers," Clement said.
"We appeal to them to come forward."
Police sources voiced suspicion that

Enrico's attackers were about his own
age, knew him well and had not in-
tended to kill. They said this still was
guesswork.,~
"People cannot be so sick as to ignore
the grief that has been shown here,"
Clement said at the boy's funeral.
"There is nothing to be proud about
in concealing the identities of ruffians
who kill a helpless lad. It makes me
sick to think that despicable yobs hood-
lums are being shielded from the law."
"My son was killed in front of 1,000
people," said Antonio Sidoli, Si. "If
they don't want to come forward, what
can I do?"

Unemployment up in July

Regents OK new 'U' budget

sContinued from Page 3)
For whatever reason, 47.,4 per
cent of all working-age women
are now looking for or holding
jobs, up from 46.1 per cent a
year ago. The participation rate
for adult men, meanwhile, has
fallen in the same period, from
81.1 per cent to 80.5 per cent.
THE UNEMPLOYMENT rate
for adult women in July was 7.6
per cent compared to 7.1 per
cent in June. Adult male un-
employment at 6.1 per cent, was
virtually unchanged from 6 per
cent in June. Unemployment

among heads of households
climbed to 5.4 per cent from 5.1
per cent.
Teen-agers and blacks, the
groups hardest hit by unemploy-
ment, gained in July, as teen-
age unemployment fell from 18.4
per cent to 18.1 per cent and
black joblessness fell from 13.3
per cent to 12.9 per cent.
The severity of unemployment
moderated somewhat, with the
average duration falling from
16.9 weeks in June to 15.8 weeks
in July.

(Continued from Page 3)
Dearborn campus, and $8,264,950
for the Flint campus.
The Regents also approved a
separate $95 million operating
budget for University Hospital,,
an increase of more than $9
million over last year's amount.
The budget calls for a 9.4 per
cent increase in daily service
charges, effective September 1,
to produce part of the additional
revenue. The rate hikes, coupled
with increased use of hospital
facilities, are expected to gen-
erate enough money to cover
increased expenses that have
resulted from inflation, mal-
practice costs and higher utility
costs.

Town mourns Litton

THE NEW budget will provide
(continued from Page 3) ton, took -25 per cent of the vote, for improvements in patient
Litton, a millionaire cattle services, including purchase of
breeder, had campaigned up to The executive committee of new equipment, changes in
the last minute, concluding a the Democratic State Commit- emergency medical service and
flying tour of the state the day tee will meet today in Jefferson e m
he died. City to set a date for the full stepped-up security.
The second-term congressman committee to select a nominee .But daily rates for wards will
from the widespread '6th Dis- to face Atty. Gen. John Danforth rise from $105 to $117 per day,
trict scored a surprising victory in November. The committee is -while charges for private ac-
in the primary by capturing 45 not bound to select any candi- com-modations will go from $117
per cent of the vote in a field of date who ran in the primary, to $129. The daily service charge
ten candidates. His nearest ri- but Hearnes said Thursday that for the hospital's intensive units
val, former Gov. Warren Hear- a majority of the committee will be, increased from $300 to
nes, had 27 per cent of the vote, members favor him. The young- $320. The Hospital Executive
and Rep. James Symington, son er Symington said he would not Board noted that the new fees
of retiring Sen. Stuart Svming- seek the nomination. ' will still be comparable with

those of other teaching hospitals complex in an effort to save 1
in the country. ' century-old facility.
Thursday's Regents meeting The Board -had initially
saw a group of enthusiasts pre- proved demolition of Waterm.
sent a 30-ainute slide presenta- Barbour last March, butt
tion depicting the beauty of the final verdict will not be deliv
Waterman-Barbour gymnasium ed until its September meeti
House may choose city
as research. center site
(Continued from Page 1) Sage maintains that Cin
halted and that previous plans nati has a lack of "professio
to build the permanent facility types" which Ann Arbor d
in Cincinnati be continued. not.
The study to find an alter.- The previous study groupv
nate site was then abandoned. searching for a city with
However, Rep. David Obey (D- established research commui
Wis.) and Sen. William Prox- and access to public hea
mire -(D-Wis.) successfully m e d i c a l and engine
fought this week for the dele- ing schools.
tion of $1.5 million in the pro- The- top ten cities listed
posed NIOSH budget for fiscal the previous study inclu
1977 which 4would have begun Ann Arbor, Pittsburgh, Cin
work on a permanent Cincinnati nati, Houston, Atlanta, Detr
complex, thus reviving thb pos- Chicago, Minneapolis, New
sibility of a continued study - leans and Madison, Wisc.
THE HQUSE will vote Mon-
day on whether to estore the Interesting facts
.$1.5 million to the appropria-
tions'bill or to send it back to aboue E,50gt oas learneo
a House-Senate conference. for iron. They used a bellows m
review, of goat skin to force air
Any decision to relocate the their iron-making furnace.
facility would most likely be__
subject to presidential review. E W. Davis at the Uni
Rep. Marvin Esch (R-Ann sity of Minnesota successf
Arbor) has been actively at- treated Taconite rock to
tempting to revive the site moye the iron.
study with letters to HEW Sec-
retary David Matthews and ap- Some 21 per cent of the
p r o p r i a t i o n s sub- torcyclists in California,
committee chairman Rep. Dan- cording to National Autom
iel Flood. Club statistics, are women,
on a national scale 5 per
ACCORDING TO Bill Sage, are women.
Esch's administrative assist-
ant, "We're not necessarily Easy and good dessert: S
pushing for the site in Ann Ar- wich a scoop of ice cream
bor, but we're trying to find nilla or chocolate flavor)
the best place for the facility, tween two halves of ca
of which Ann Arbor is surely pears and top with choc
one possibility." sauce.

the
ap-
an'
the
-er
ing
cin-
nal
Joes
was
an
nity
lth,
ieer-
in
ded
cin-
roit,
Or
i
by
ught
iade
into
iver-
fully
re-
mo-
ac-
obile
but
cent
and-
(va-
be-
nned
slate

ROBERT REDFORD in 1969
DOWNHILL RACER
With the summer Olympic fever just subsiding, we bring you Michael
Richie's (director of SMILE and BAD NEWS BEARS) arresting exploration
of winning and losing on a world scale. Redford plays a hot-shot skier from
way-out west who tries to be a star, stud, and gold medalist in one easy jump.
With Gene Hackman and Commila Sporu. Short: GOLD RUSH MICKEY.
SUN.: Serge Eisenstein's ALEXANDER NEXSKY
(FREE-AT 8)
CIN EMA GUILD TONIGHT AT OLD ARCH. A UD.
HASKELL WEXLER'S 1967
MEDIUM COOL
The first feature filmdirected by Haskell Wexler, award-winning cinema-
tographer of ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO'S NEST. Documentary foot-
age of the riots outside the 1968 Democratic Convention provides the cli-
max of the story of a television news photographer who is gradually drawn
into the reality which he records on film. With Robert Foster, Verna Bloom,
Peter Bonery, Marianna Hill, and Harold Blankenship..
C IE A II TONIGHT AT ANGELL HALL AUD. A
7:30 & 9:30 Admission $1.50

'I

the f narbor fim oYp ra" w
TONIGHT an Encore of
Woody Allen in MLB 3
LOVE AND DEATH
(1975) 7 &10:30
w oo Allen's satire on Russian novels, Napoeonic wars, and
moi1lsistfrom -i -euis tBrgmansuopleteih snr-
lner* sa ou eyntgAiien, dineKet nstar.
TAKE THE MONEY AND RUN
1969) 8:45 only
In hs Airecting debut.-Allen lays virgil, product/result of an
,ifowunrte childhood: b ken glasses, neighborhood bully,
bilet-tug parents, acute sals playing. and a neurotictendency
to iin a girl by stealing money. His downfai comes when he
oisspel sg'n on his hoidup note. Stars Alien, and Janet
Mar $ DEliU.
$1.25, DOUBLE FEATURE $2.00

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