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July 31, 1976 - Image 10

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-07-31

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Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, July 31, 1976

Esch: A liberal dose of confidence

(Continued from Pae 3)
other S. S. Kresge vice-presi-
dent, an AMC vice-president,
and a Ford Motor Company
vice-president.
BUT, ESCH SAYS his candid-
acy has "no ties to big busi-
ness."
As the apparent leader in the
race, Each has suffered assault
upon charge from Brennan,
Baker, andgHuber. While try-
ing to appeal across the party
and to conservative Democrats
and independents themselves,
Baker and Brennan have called
the Esch record inconsistent
and fence - straddling, a stra-
teav to appeal to all philoso-
phies. Huber, an ultra - con-
servative, identifies Esch as
one of a group of office-holders
he calls "the mushy middle" -
politicians who lack the cour-
age of their convictions or who
have no convictions at all.

"I think Marvin Esch has
stayed on his feet for ten years
as a Congressman and I think
there's very little consistency in
the positions he's taken," said
Brennan earlier this week.
"He's had a great attraction
for people who are the big shots
because he's been very willing
to go where the major forces
are going."
"WHEN YOU HAVE this
mushy middle that everybody's
been crowding into then you
have this problem of continual
compromise and that's disas-
tro's," said fuber.
Baker is particularly angered
by the attention Esch has re-
ceived for the so-called "Esch
amendment," a measure which
would, if made law, limit forc-
ed busing of school children.
After considerable revision and
consideration, it awaits vote in
the Senate.

When a reporter pointed out
the significance of the amend-
ment to Baker last week, he
said, "Baloney. He hasn't
got anything. The attorney gen-
eral of the United States says
that doesn't have a chance. He
said there's no law Congress
can pass that can prevent forc-
ed busing. That (Esch's tout-
ing the bill as a breakthrough)
is a typical politician's mis-
leading statement."
THE COOL, COLLECTED
Esch greets the attacks of his
opnonents with reserve.
"Oh, I never set myself up
avainst other candidates," he
says wryly. "Ive tried to dis-
cuss the issues."
He puts across the message
that only he, the experienced
legislator, possesses the exper-
tise to be an effective senator.
On the issues, Esch ranges
from moderate to liberal:

-ECONOMY. He wrote the
Comprehensive Employment
and Training Act, which rep-
resents his basic approach to
fighting unemployment. He op-
poses the Humphrey - Hawkins
employment bill but supported
the recent public works bill
passed by Congress over Presi-
dent Ford's veto. He supports a
balanced budget, and says in-
centive programs for business
would help to bolster the econo-
my.
--DEFENSE. He supports a
"lean and efficient defense sys-
tem." He has endorsed the con-
troversial B-1 bomber and Tri-
dent sib'marine programs. "I
think as long as there are con-
flicting ideologies we have to be
number one."
--EQUAL RIGHTS AMEND-

MENT. He supports it.
-ABORTION. He opposes the
Supreme Court decisions which
support abortion, and says "I
strongly believe in the family
planning movement."
-CRIME. He says he would
focus on law enforcement and
punishment on the repeat offen-
der ,and support minimum sen-
tences before probations.
--ISRAEL. "I have supported
and continue to support Israel.
We need to reach a non-mili-
tary settlement" of Middle-East
tensions.
-N A T I O N A L HEALTH
insurance. "Any program has
to be built on the present sys-
tem" of private health insur-
ance companies and private
doctors, rather than a massive
new plan.

Minority parties await
decision on ballot bil

Cwc/ AWv'4Ati , enice4

UNIVERSITY CHURCH
OF CHRIST
Presently Meeting at
YM-YWCA, 530S. Fifth
David Graf, Minister
Students Welcome
For informaion or transpor-
tion: 663-3233 or 662-2494.
10:00 a.m.-Sunday Worship.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN
CHAPEL (LCMS)
1511 Washtenaw Ave. 663-S560
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday morning worship at
9:30.
Sunday Bible study at 10:45.
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH (ALC-LCA)
(Formerly Lutheran Student
Chapel)
Gordon Ward, Pastor
801 S. Forest Ave. at Hill St.
Sunday Service at 9:30 a.m.
UNIVERSITY CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
4095. Division
M. Robert Fraser, Pastor
Church School-9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship-11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship-7:00 p.m.

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw
Sunday Service and Sunday
School-10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Testimony Meet-
ing-8:00 p.m.
Child Care-Sunday, under 2
years.
Midweek Informal Worship.
Reading Room-306 E. Liber-
ty, 10-5 Monday through Satur-
day; closed Sundays.
FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
State at Huron and Washington
Worship Services:
8:30 a.m.-Communion Service
-Chapel.
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Worship
Service-Sanctuary.
9:30 and 11:00 a.m. - Church
School.
Worship Services are broad-
cast over WNRS-AM (1290) each
Sunday from 11:00-12:00 noon.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw--662-4466
Worship - Sunday, 9:30 and
11:00 a.m.

Grad Student Ellie says:
g CO-OPS ARE
o GREAT!1
Join a CO-Op and find out if
she's right!
We have immediate openings for
women on North Campus for fall-
winter, featuring:
-LOVELY SURROUNDINGS
-REGULAR, FREE BUS SERVICE
-FRIENDLY FOLK
MEMBER OWNERSHIP AND CONTROL
Call 662-4414, or come to Room 4002
Michigan Union

ST. MARY STUDENT CHAPEL
(Catholic)
331 Thompson-663-557
Weekend Masses:
Saturday-5 p.m., 11:30 p.m.
Sunday - 7:45 a.m., 9 a.m.,
10:30 a.m., noon, and 5 p.m.
(plus 9:30 a.m. North Campus).
CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw Ct.
Pastor: Don Postema
Morning. Worship at 10 a.m.
6:00 p.m. -Service of Holy
Communion.
UNIVERSITY REFORMED
CHURCH, 1001 K. Huron
Calvin Malefyt, Alan Rice,
Ministers
10:00 a.m-Morning Worship]
ANN ARBOR CHURCH
OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium Blvd.
(one block west of
U of M Stadium)
Bible Study - Sunday, 9:30
a.m.-Wednesday, 7:30 p.m.
Worship-Sunday, 10:30 am.
and 6:00 p.m.
Need Transportation? C all1
662-9928.
SUN PHOTO
I Day
Color Print Service
PROCESSING LAB
20%l discount on
Kodak processing
EASY DRIVING AND
PARKING
3180 Packard
1 b1k. E. of Platt
913-0110
NEW HOURS:
Tue., Wed., Thurs., Fri.
8:30-6
Monday 8:30-8
Sat. 8:30-12 noon

M 8iner, coyote fliplids
PENDLETON, Ore. (A' - Deputy David Rogers of the Uma-
tilla County sheriff's office was patrolling the Dead Man's Rest
area two miles east of here when he spotted a casket in the back
of a parked pickup.
The truck was empty, so Rogers, thinking he might have a
graverobbing case on his hands, checked the surrounding area.
NOTHING.
When he returned, he noticed the lid slightly open.
He aimed his flashlight at the coffin and saw feet, hands, then
a face.
The lid swung up, and out climbed Melvin Axel Nelson, 52,
Aumsville, and his pet coyote.
As it turned out, Nelson is a gold miner and was headed for
Malheur County in the southeastern part of the state to do some
prospecting.
He said he sleeps in the coffin because it is cheaper than
other camping gear, and during the day he can put his mining
tools in it.
"TO EMPOWER THE POWERLESS:
REFLECTIONS ON A VOCATION"
OFFERED BY
BARBARA CARTWRIGHT
(of the American Friends Service Committee)
Sunday, August 1, 8:00 P.M.
at the ECUMENICAL CAMPUS CENTER
921CHURCH (between Hill and Oakland)

(Continued from Page 1)
Minority party members view
this bill as a blatant political
move by the Democrats and Re-
publicans to keep troublesome,
vote-splitting parties off the fall
ballot.
U.S. LABOR Party member
James Rosenblatt said the bill
was passed "specifically against
us, to keep us off the ballot."
Rosenblatt claims the Demo-
crats were especially concernedm
that the U.S. Labor party may
find its way on to the ballot be-
cause it might siphon off poten-
tial Democratic votes.
Hudler seconded Rosenblatt's
charge, saying "it pretty clearly
began with the Democrats."
LIBERTARIAN Bill Palmer
voiced other complaints about
the bill.
"First, it was instituted after
we completed our petition drive,
after we had reached the re-
quired number of signatures,"
noted Palmer, "so essentially
the law was changed to put two
hurdles in the way to get on the
November ballot."
Palmer added, "The way the

bill is designed it works against
us. People can split their ballot
between the Republicans and
the Democrats but if they do
that they can't vote for us."
PALMER believes the ques-
tion of minority parties receiv-
ing a spot on the November
ballot ought to be a separate
ballot proposition.
"They should run this as a
separate deal," he said. "At
(least that way the average
voter can vote for our party."
Hudler termed the law "really
a political ploy - looks like
they're trying to mess up the
minority parties."
HOWEVER, HE feels "very
confident" of a favorable deci-
sion even if the court turns over
the law on other than constitu-
tional grounds.
"If we don't win on constitu-
tional grounds," warned Hudler,
"we'll take it to the Supreme
Court if necessary."
Rosenblatt commented of an
unfavorable outcome. "If we
don't get on the November bal-
lot-all the people are going to
get is Jimmy Carter."

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