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May 05, 1976 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-05-05

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, May 5, 1976 I

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAiLY Wednesday, May 5, 1976

MODIFY YOUR
UNDESIRABLE BEHAVIORS
IF YOU-)WANT TO:
1) LOSE WEIGHT
2) STOP CIGARETTE SMOKING.
3) INCREASE STUDY SKILLS
4) STOP BITING FINGER NAILS
5) EXERCISE MORE FREQUENTLY
6) MEET MORE PEOPLE
7) COMPLETE YOUR DISSERTATION
8) CHANGE OTHER MINOR
MALADAPTIVE BEHAVIORS
Students in Psycholony 414 (Adv~anced Laboratory in
Behavior Modification) in Cooperation with the Insti-
tute of Behavior Chonae, will work with you in chona-
no your undesirable behaviors.
For Registration Information CALL: 994-3332
2200 FULLER RD.-Suite 209

Australia gefs new anthem

CANBERRA, Australia (UPI)
-Prime Minister Malcolm Fra-
ser announced today that Aus-
tralia has decided to make
"Waltzing Matilda" its national
anthem although "God Save the
Queen" will still be played for
royal occasions.
"WALTZING Matilda," which
won international recognition in
the two world wars and later as
the theme of the nuclear holo-
caust movie "On The Beach,"
was written by Australian na-
tional poet A.B. "Banjo" Patter-
son and first played at a horse
race in 1895.
The lyrics tell the story of a
swagman drifter who stole a
jumbuck sheep from a squatter
NOW

rancher and escaped state troop-
ers by jumping into a billabong
(small lake or lagoon). The
swagman drowned.
Discarded were the more dig-
nified and little known "Song of
Australia" - d "Advance Aus-
tralia Fair," the latter often
criticized for its expansionist
overtones.
"AT FUNCTIONS like the
Olympic games a purely Aus-
tralian song should be ob-
served," Fraser told the House
of Representatives, "and the
government is strongly of the
opinion that it should be 'Waltz-
ing Matilda.' "
"'Waltzing Matilda' is recog-
nized around the world as Aus-

tralian and moves the hearts
and minds of all Australians,"
Fraser said.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVI, No.1-8
Wednesday, May 5, 1976
is edited and managed by students
at the Universityat Miecsigan News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48119.
Publised d ally Tueaday tbrough
Sunday mornine during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48109. subscription
rates: $12 Sept. tha April (2 aes-
tera} ; $13 by mall outside Ann
Arbor.
summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $650 in Ann
Arbor; $7.50 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.

Complete ScientificProgrammability from
Hewlett-Packard for $30 less than ever before.

Think of the HP-25 as
an electronic slide rule
you can program corn-
pletely.The reason: It
solves repetitive problems
easily and quickly.
Here's how. Switch to PRGM.
Enter the keystrokes you need to solve
your problem once and then flip the PROM+
switch to RUN. That's it.The only thing you
have to do for each iteration from then on is
enter your variables and press the R/S (Run/
Stop) key. It's that simple.
The result: Repetitive problems are no
longer a repetitive problem.
But that's only part of the HP-25 story.
Here's more. You can add to, check or edit
your programs at will.You can also write one-
second interruptions into your program in

case you want to note intermediate answers.
And because the keycodes of all prefixed
functions are merged, the 49-step program
memory can actually store up to 147 key-
strokes. (How's that for a memory capacity!)
What's more, you can store numbers in eight
data registers and perform 72 preprogrammed
functions and operations (logs, trig, mean
deviations, rectangular-polar conversions,
summations-you name it). Not to mention
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engineering notation; and much, much more.
In fact, if you wanted to know all the
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But don't worry, we've already written one -
125 pages-worth-just chock full of applica-
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as Algebra and Number Theory, Numerical
Methods, Statistics-even Games. In detail,

The HP-25: Just $165?
And don't forget the best news.The
price.The HP-25 was an exceptional value at
$195. Right now it's an out-and-out bargain
at $165*
The HP-25. There's never been a calcu-
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And you know what that means. Design,
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The HP-25 is almost certainly available
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dealer.
HEWLETTI PACKARD
Dept. 658F 19310 Pruneridge Avenue. Cupertino, CA 95514.
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