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June 22, 1976 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1976-06-22

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, June 22, 1976

Court OK's funds for church colleges

WASHINGTON (A') - The Su-
preme Court ruled yesterday
that taxpayer's money consti-
tutionally may be spent on an-
nual grants to church - related
colleges to provide nonreligious
education.
Dr. Eldon Smith, executive
secretary of the national coun-
cil of independent colleges,
called the court's 5-4 ruling "a
landmark decision" for finan-
cially hard - pressed church af-
filiated schools.
S P E C I F I C A L L Y

the court upheld a Maryland
program, carrying a current ap-
propriation of $5.3 million per
year, under which grants are
made to colleges which attest
that the money is not being put
to sectarian use.
In addition to Maryland, pro-
grams of state aid to private
colleges, including those with
church ties, are in effest in I-
linois, Louisiana, Michigan,
Minnesota, New Jersey, New
York, North Carolina, Oregon
and Pennsylvania.

Since the laws vary, yester-
day's decision does not mean
all of them could survive a
court test, but a decision strik-
ing down the Maryland pro-
gram would presumably have
invalidated all of them, Smith
said.
IN ANOTHER church-state
case the justices ruled 7-2 that
Illinois courts intruded improp-
erly into a religious dispute
within the Serbian Eastern Or-
thodox Church. They said courts
should not referee such dis-
putes in a church which has its
own hierarchy.
In the only other case it de-
cided by a written opinion, the
court upheld by a 6-3 vote an
Eastlake, Ohio, ordinance re-
quiring approval in a referen-
dum before rezoning of prop-
erty from one use to another
can go into effect.
IN OTHER actions, the court:
--Upheld without elaboration
a lower court's ruling that a
Missouri law barring police
from bargaining collectively,
while allowing other public em-

playes to do so, is not uncon-
stitutionally discriminatory.
--Agreed to review a federal
court's decision striking down
a New Hampshire law under
which a motorist was jailed
for placing red reflective tape
over the state motto, "Live
Free or Die," on his automo-
bile license plates.
-Declined to advise the
judges of the U. S. Court of
Claims as to whether they may
legally consider a suit to raise
the salary of federal judges
even though the outcome could
affect their own paychecks.
This leaves it up to the court
of claims to deal with the eth-
ical question itself.
The decision on the Maryland
law was the second time in re-
cent years that the court has
allowed tax - supported finan-
cial assistance for church - re-
lated colleges.
In 1971, the court upheld a

federal law providing construc.
tion grants for college facili-
ties, both public and private,
excluding those to be used for
sectarian instruction or re-
ligious worship or as part of a
school or department of divin-
ity.
HORSES HELP TRADE
NEW YORK (A)-- When
Washington economists t a 1 k
about America's balance of
trade they might give thorough.
bred horses a plug. In 1974 the
export of horses from the
United States to 15 foreign
countries brought $32,824,237
into the country. The cost of
importing horses came to
$19,191,391.
On Sept. 5, 1774 delegates
from all the colonies except
Georgia convened in the Phila-
delphia for the first Continental
Congress.

PROJECT OUTREACH
OPEN HOUSE
JUNE 30-7-9 P.M.
554 THOMPSON
For s t u d e n t s interested in experiential
learning in psychology through Community
involvement.

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6:00 2 7 11 13 NEWS
9 BEVERLY HILLBILLIES
20 CISCO KID
30 ZOOM
50 BRADY BUNCH
56 SPEAKING FREELY
62 I SPY
6:30 4 13 NBC NEWS
9 NEWS
11 CBS NEWS
20 DANIEL BOONE
30 HODGEPODGE LODG)0E
50 1 LOVE ILUCY
7:00 2 CBS NEWS
4 BOWLING FOR DOLLARS
7 ABC NEWS
11 BRADYWBUNCH
13 HOGAN'S HEROES
30 BASICALLY BASEBALL
50 FAMILY AFFAIR
56 WOMAN
62 SPEAKING OF SPORTS
7:30 2 NAME THAT TUNE
4 GEORGE PIERROT
7 PRICE IS RIGHT
9 ROOM 222
11 DON ADAMS SCREEN TEST
13 ADAM-12
20 STUMP THE STARS
30 FIRING LINE
50 HOGAN'S HEROES
56 EVENING EDITION WITH
MARTIN AGRONSKY
62 NEWS
8:00 2 11 I'VE GOT A SECRET
4 WORLD AT WAR
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVI. No. 34-S
Tuesday, June 22, 1976
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan News
phone 764-0562. Second clas postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published d ai1 y Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann
Arbor, Mchtan 48100. Subscrption
rates: $t2 Sept. thru April (2 semes-
ters) ; $13 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.
Summer session published Tues-
day t h rough Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $6 50 in Ann
Arbor; $7.50 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.

7 HAPPY DAYS
9 ON THE EVIDENCE
13 MOVIN' ON
20 IT TAKES A THIEF
50 MERV GRIFFIN
56 LOWELL THOMAS
REMEMBERS
62 MOVIE-"Dimension 5"
8:30 2 11 GOOD TIMES
7 LAVERNE & SHIRLEY
30 56 CONSUMER SURVIVAL
KIT
9:00 2 11 McAcScH
o 13 POLICE WOMAN
7 S.W.A.T
S FINLAY A COMPANY
20 700 CLUH
30 THEATER IN AMERICA
56 OLYMPIAD
9:30 2 11 ONE DAY AT A TIAE
S LOOK WHO'S HERE
50 DINAH!
10:00 2 11 CBS REPORTS
4 13 NBC NEWS SPECIAL
7 ROOKIES
9VICTOR BORGE
56 MONTY PYTHON'S
FLYING CIRCUS
62 PTL CLUB
10:30 9 OPEN ROADS
20 PRACTICAL CHRESA N
LIVING
56 MARK OF JAZZ
11:00 2 4 7 11 13 NEWS
9CBS NEWS
20 ADVENTURES IN
PARADISE
50 BEST OF GROUCHO
56 IT'S YOUR TURN
11:30 2 MARY HARTMAN,
MARY HARTMAN
7 MYSTERY OF THE WEEK
"Murder and the Computer'
9 NEWS
11 MOVIE-"Puppet on a Chain"
50 MOVIE-"Atlas"
56 ABC NEWS
12:00 2 MOVIE--
'Puppet on a Chains"
"How Green Was My VaIiey"
62 NEWS
1:00 4 TOMORROW
7 13 NEWS
1:25 2 MOVIE--"Big House, U.S.A."
2:00 4 CLASSROOM
2.30 4 NEWS
3:25 2 NEWS

OPEN 7 DAYS
A WEEK
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