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June 09, 1976 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-06-09

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Wednesday, June , 1976

THE MICHIGAN GAILY

Page Five

,ab Reporter termed 'grave'
9 after amputation of arm

PHOENIX, Ariz. (A') - Don
Bolles, Arizona Republic re-
porter who lost his right leg in
a bomb blast, had his infected
right arm amputated yesterday
and was in "extremely grave"
condition at St. Joseph's Hospi-
tal.
Doctors attempted to treat
the infection with surgery and
antibiotics Monday night but or-
dered the amputation when Bol-
les' condition deteriorated.
M E A N W H I L E, Police
Capt. Don Lozier, who heads
the investigation of the car
bombing, said, "With new de-
velopments we are getting clos-
er to the powers behind this."
Lozier said Frank Landry,
32, an associate of John Adam-
son, the man Bolles planned to
meet at the time of the explo-
sion, has been questioned
Finger and palmprints were

found on Bolles' car, Lozier
added. "Because of their loca-
tion, they are not likely to have
belonged to members of the
family," he said. The prints
were being analyzed.
Landry was arrested on a
traffic warrant at Adamson's
apartment Saturday when po-
lice seized magnets, homemade
firecrackers, batteries, electric-
al wire and tape. Adamson, 32,
had surrendered a day earlier
on a misdemeanor charge of
defrauding an innkeeper. Both
were released on bond.
Bolles left a note for fellow
reporters the day of the bomb-
ing, saying he was going to the
n o r t h - P h o e n i x Claren-
don House Iotel to meet with
Adamson. who supposedly had
information on a land deal pos-
sibly involving high-ranking
Arizona politicians.

Sheepishness
Shepherd Mike Ithurralde tends his flock of 1,700 sheep with his dog Pinto at the base of Little
Mountain near San Bernardino, Calif.

Mighty Joe Young
THE BEST CHICAGO BLUESMAN!
~
JUNE 9th-10th
WEEKLY HOURS: 9 p.m.-2 a.m.
HOURS, Fri. & Sat. 8 p.m.-2 a.m.
516 E. Liberty 994-5350

Flood still
IDAHO FALLS (M) - Flood
waters from the burst Teton
Dan were spilling safely into
another dam's reservoir yester-
day, but officials feared more
loss of farmlands if irrigation
canals damaged by the earlier
flooding were not quickly re-
paired.
An estimated 300 square
miles, including more than 30,-
000 acres of fertile farmland,
were inundated along the 80-
mile path of destruction from
the floods. Officials fear much
more farmland will dry up un-
less the damaged irrigation ca-
nals are repaired quickly.
SEVEN PERSONS have been
killed in the flooding, and the
sheriff of Fremont County said
he has two more victims to add
to the list. Another 30 are miss-
ing, and more than 500 were in-
jured.
Total flood damage estimates
vary but have ranged up to $1
billion. The dam was operated
by the U. S. Bureau of Recla-
mation, and Gov. Cecil Andrus
was to meet with Asst. Interior
Secretary Jack Horton in an ef-
fort to get the government to
admit liability for the collapse
of the recently completed dam.
IF NECESSARY, Andrus said,
he will go to Congress or to the
courts to argue the state's

imperils Idaho farms

claim. Idaho's members of Con-.
gress also plan to work to get
the federal government to pay
damages.
In Washington, Interior De-
partment officials told Presi-
dent Ford the government must
act quickly to save 400,000 acres
of farmland that cannot get ir-
rigation because of flood dam-
age.
Gilbert Stamm, head of the
Bureau of Reclamation, return-
ed from a tour of the flooded
area and told Ford the "No. I
priority" is to prevent drying
out in the lands between Idaho
Falls and American Falls that
were not flooded by rely on ir-
rigation.
FORD WAS told builders took
extra precautions in sealing
the dam's foundation and that
the collapse "couldn't happen,
but it did."
Stamm said, "I think for the
image of the federal govern-
ment as well as the welfare of
the people, we need to move in
immediately and start some-
thing there."
Idaho officials say they will
seriously question any proposal
to rebuild the Teton Dam at
the same site. Many flood vic-
tims appear also to blame the
government for damages and
want to be reimbursed.

C O N S T R U C T I O N
of the Teton Dam originally
was delayed for years by court
actions of environmentalists.
Close to a dozen communities
were seriously affected by the
flooding, which began Satur-
day when about one-third of the
controversial 300-foot-high dam
washed away.

Heads U$.
Here Come the Heavies ..
CHICKEN IN A LOG N.Y. STRIP STEAK
Deep fried with biscuits $2.95 Broiled, then, toped with $6.95
FRIhoeDvHIM onodito tiinserc no
FR IED FISH FI LLETS FI LET MIGNON
With tartar sauce and Smothered with sauteed mushrooms
emon wedges$59
$275G ROU ND BE EF ST EAK
FRIED SH RIMP Topped wits, smothered onions
With cocktail sauce and $2.95
lemon wedge
$4.50 All served with Soup or
Salad and Broasted Potatoes
x80 ackson Road

Ann Arbor Public Schools Notice
ATTENTION-voters in Word I,
Pct. 2, South Quad
Your POLLING PLACE for the ANNUAL
SCHOOL ELECTION, Monday, June 14,
1976 has been moved from South Quad
to West Quad, 541 Thompson Street.

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