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May 22, 1976 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-05-22

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Poge Ten

THE MICHIGAN aDlLY

Saturday, May 22, 1976 .

Clrw'c& e Riding on air in low
______ __energy windmobile

FIRST UNITED METRODIST
CHURCH
State at Huron and Washingtoak
Worship Services:
8:30 a.m.-Communion Service
-Chapel.
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Worship
Service-Sanctuary.
9:30 and 11:00 a.m. -Church
School.
U.M.Y.F. Contemporary Serv-
ice 'ILighlshine."
Worship Services are broad-
cast over WNRS-AM (1290) each
Sunday from 11:00-12:00 noon.
UNIVERSITY REFORMED
ChURCH, 1001 E. Huron
Calvin Matefyt, Alan Rice,
Ministers
9:30 a.m.--Church School.
10:30 a.m.-Mo>rning Worship.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw-662-4466
Worship - Suind:y, 9:30 and
11:00 a.m.
Young Adult meal. Sunday.
12:30 p.m Wednesday, 61,0 pm.
($1.00).
Stuldy andicus1 su t-
11:00 am. Sunday: Adult
study.
12:00-1:00 Thursday: Thursday
Forum (lunch. $1 25)
Chancel C h oi r 7:00-8:30
Thursday-
For mare infrmatiun about
the Young Adul: Prouram call
Jo Ann Stnchlei at the church.
662-4466

UNIVERSITY CHURCH
OF CHRIST
Presently Meeting at
YM-YWCA, 3SS. Fifth
David Graf, Minister
Students Welcomb.
Far information or transpor-
tion: 663-3233 or 662-2494.
10:00 a.m.-Sunday Worship.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw Ct.
Pastor: Don Postema
10:00 a.m.-Morning Worship
-"The Playful Life."
6:00 p.m.-Ms. Barbara Fuller
will show slides of a recent visit
to North and South Vietnam.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN
CHAPEL (LCMS)
1511 Washtenaw Ave. 663-5560
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday morning workship at
9:30.
Sunday Bible study at 10:45.
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH (ALC-LCA)
(Formerly Lutheran Student
Chapel)
Gordon Ward, Pastor
801 S. Forest Ave. at Hill St.
Sunday Service at 10:30 a.tn
UNIVERSITY CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
409 S. Division
M. Robert Fraser, Pastor
Church School-9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship--11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship-7:00 p.m.

ST. MARY STUDENT CHAPEL
(Catholic)
331 Thompson-663-OS
Weekend Masses:
Saturday-5 p.m., 11:30 p.m.
Sunday - 7:45 a.m., 9 a.m.,
10:30 a.m., noon. and $ pm.
(plus 9:30 a.m. North Campus).
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw
Sunday Service and Sunday
Schop-10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Testimony Meet-
ing-8:00 p.m.
Child Care-Sunday, under 2
years.
Midweek Informal Worship.
Reading Room - 306 E. Lib-
erty,10-6 Monday and Friday;
10-5 all other days; closed Sun-
days.
ANN ARBOR CHURCH
OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium Blvd.
(one block west of
U of M Stadium)
Bible Study - Sunday, 9:30
a.m.-Wednesday, 7:30 p.m.
Worship-Sunday, 10:30 a.m.
and 6:00 p.m.
Need Transportation? C a II
662-9928.
ORCHESTRA RETURNS
NEW YORK (A) - After an
absence of 10 years, the Vienna
Philharmonic O r c h e s t r a
returns to the United States to
play nine concerts.
Three performances will be
given in New York City, start-
ing April 1. The others include
two in Washington, one in Chi-
cago, two at Iowa State Univer-
sity, and one in Tartford, Conn.
PRINT EXHIBIT
LOS ANGELES (A') -
'American Prints: A Selection
From the Permanent Collec-
tion" will be shown at the Los
Angeles County Museum of Art
through June 20 as part of the
Bicentennial year celebration.
The exhibit consists of some
75 works from the 19th and 20th
centuries, including prints by
such artists as Winslow Homer,
C h i 1 d e Hassam, and John
Sloan.

(Oontinued from Page ti
retained the three-wheeled de-
sign of a sailplane.
When the wind hits the arch-
shaped wing at an angle, the
airflow produces a forward-
acting element which drives
the car. There is no chance of
the vehicle becoming airborne
because --of a tail wing which
sits behind the vehicles center
of gravity and pushes the nose
down, much like a spoiler on a
race car.
A 10 M.P.H. crosswind is
enough to move the Windmobile
at a speed of 50 m.p.h., and
higher crosswind speeds permit
the spinning wheels to recharge
the batteries. In low winds, the
batteries alone can carry the
vehicle 40 miles at a speed of
45 m.p.h.
As an aerodynamic engineer,
James Amick worked at the
U n i v e r s i t y aerody-
namics laboratory until 1970
when he says, "they ran out of
research projects." He - still
serves as an occasional consult-
ant at the University windd sun-
nel, but his work now consists
primarily of perfecting the
Windmobile. Amick describes
himself as "a freelance inven-
tor," bitt concedes that nothing
he has designed is currently on
the market.
"I'm hopeful that this car
will get other people interested
in wind power," he says. 'It
will let them enjoy the wind."
DRIVERS WHO get a kinky
thrill out of sitting at intersec-
tions and gunning an internal
combustion engine will find the
Windmobile quite different. The
electric motor makes the car
very quiet even when not under
wind power, although the
Amicks say it could be adapted
to an internal combustion en-
gine. The acceleration is also
extremely smooth.
'The most fascinating part of
it is when you're driving and
get a gust of wind and you feel
the engine accelerate," says
Doug Amick, a senior at Albion
who has test driven the car. It's
very much like a glider."
'You feel he wind pick you
up, and then - vwoosh!" he
adds, punctuating his sentence
with a smooth hand gesture to
indicate the even acceleration
of the car. "It's a nice feeling
moving with just the wind."
"IT'S SOMETHING when
you see the ammeter (which
measures electric power) reads
zero," says his brother, Rich.
"You're on wind power alone.
You're locked in."
The Amicks envision the car
more as a vehicle for inter-city
driving than for use on city

the " narbor flmcooperative
MONDAY ERROL FLYNN FESTIVAL
GENTLEMAN JIM
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CAPTAIN BLOOD
(Michnel Curtiz. 1935) MLB 3-9 ONLY
truiirn-i' slituslstflium of o rl 'iim festiva is the fiim that
made hin a star. Hi, portray:ul of Dr. Peter Blood, rebel pirate
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streets. City driving is possi-
ble, but the stop-and-go traffic
of a city uses more energy,
since the electric mtor mast
be used to obtain the initial
thrust from a standing start.
The Windmobile has, how-
ever, done as many as 40 steps
and still had power to spare.
A N O T H E R interesting
feature of the car is a "regen-
erative braking" system. On
present autos, much energy is
lost through heat on the brake
shoes. The Windmobile converts
this energy back into power-
the battery is recharged as the
vehicle is slowed.
The prototype was financed
jointly by Amick and SunWind
Ltd. of Sebastlpool, California at
a cost of about $5,000. SunWind,
an alternative energy com-
pany which also produces the
solar-powered SunWind Surrey,
hopes to have the Windmobile
in production before the end of
the year.
James Amick estimates the
market price of the car will be
about $5,000, adding that the
price may be lower depending
on the amount of research and
development necessary before
production begins. Lights, sig-
nals and other safety devices
still must be added to the
Windmobile before it can be
marketed.
THE REACTION OF most
people to the Windmobile is
probably akin to that of the
traffic cop who pulled the car
over on one test run not for
any traffic violation, but just to
see what such an odd contrap-
tion was doing on the road.
But in forty years, after all the
fossil fuels are gone people
may start making the trip
dawn to see their Windmobile
dealer.
In any case, the Amicks re-
main very proud of their car.
"We're looking for a good
wind," says Doug. "Then we'll
be able to drive it to Mackinac
and say it didn't cost us a
thing."
HELP FOR THE HUNGRY
PHILADELPHIA, Pa. (M -
Americans are being urged to
contribute the savings from one
weekly sacrificial meal to Op-
eration Rice Bowl (ORB), an
inter-faith program designed to
help feed the world's hungry.
ORB is sponsored by the 41st
International Eucharistic Con-
gress, a worldwide spiritual as-
sembly of Catholics and other
Christians, which convenes
here Aug. 1-8. The over-all
theme of the conclave is "The
Eucharist and the Hungers of
the Human Family."
The Congress recommends
the restricted diet meal be ea-
ten each Wednesday during the
seven weeks of Lent.
Starting in 1861, Maryland
was under military rule during
the war between the states.

KATHARINE HEPBURN in 1933
LITTLE WOMEN
George Cukor directed this splendid adaptation of the Louisa May Alcott's
classic of four daughters growing up in a Civil War household. Hepburn is
the focal point throughout. With John Bennett and Spring Byington. -
SUN.: Murnou's & Flaherty's TASU free aO 8
NEXT WEEKEND: Ann Arbor Prenere of UNDERGROUND
A COLOR DOCUMENTARY ON WEATHERMEN ACTIVITY
CINEMA GUILD 'aGHT3 atOdrARCH. AUD.
CI E A il LOo 30 &9:35 O dmission$1.25
JOHN CASSAVETTE'S 1976
ANN ARBOR PREMIERE
. THE KILLING OF A CHINESE BOOKIE
The latest improvisation work by the director of A WOMAN UNDER THE INFLUENCE and
HUSBANDS. Ben Gazzaro stars as Cosmo Vittelli, nightclub owner in the sleozy world of
L.A.'s Sunset Strip. To erase a namblino debt, bon-loser Vittelli is forced to commit a
murder-one that ultimately leads to his own destruction. Excellent suooortina oerformances
by Sevmour Cassel, and newcomers Azizi Johori and Alice Friedland as stinopers in Cosmo's
club.
TONIGHT at ANGELL HALL, AUD. A
CINEMA 11 7:30 & 9:45 P.M. ADM. $1.50

! 1Ut4llOAN EVENING OF
EN~S YEAR
tilt WOMEN'S MUSIC
CHRIS
WILLIAMSON
MONDAY, MAY 24-8:30 P.M.
MICHIGAN UNION BALLROOM
$3.00-Tickets at door

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