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July 18, 1975 - Image 11

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-07-18

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Friday, July 18, 1975

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Doge Eleven

FrdyJly1, 95T HEMCIA ~L aeEee

Juryre,
By The Associated Press
MINNEAPOLIS - The assault trial of Dave
Forbes went to the jury yesterday in a case
marking the first time a proessional athlete has
been taken to criminal court in the United States
for an incident that occurred during a sports con-
test.
The jury of seven men and five women re-
ceived the case shortly before noon.
Forbes, 26, of the Boston Bruins, is charged
with aggravated assault with a deadly weapon
- his hickey stick. The charge stems from a
attack on Henry Boucha of the Minnesota North
Stars in a National Hockey League game last
Jan. 4 at Bloomington, Minn. A guilty verdict
could have major significance if civil authori-
ties choose to intercede as a result of future
violence in sports.
Hennepin County District Judge Rolf Fosseen
told the jury it could return one of three verdicts
- guilty of the charge, which carries a maximum
penalty of five years in jail and a $5,000 fine;
guilty of assault, a misdemeanor punishable by 90
days in jail and a $300 fine, or innocent.
Throughout the six days of testimony, prosecu-
tor Cary Flakne attempted to demonstrate that
the Forbes-Boucha scrap was not a typical hockey
fight.
"This did not ccur as a normal event in a
hockey game," said Flakne in his closing argu-
ments. "It was unique . . . It was a deliberate
attack with a weapon.
"This was an assault. It was not a fight . . .
A crime is a crime no matter where it occurs."
Defense attorney Ron Meshbesher argued that
the fight was not out of the ordinary in a sport
that encourages violence, and that a player ac-
cepts the possibility of fights when he goes on
the ice.

lires in Forbes trial

Conviction would have widespread effects in all
sports, he said, because civil officials would in
effect become extra referees at athletic contests.
In his closing arguments, Meshbesher contend-
ed that Forbes was the victim of a "hometown
indictment."
"I submit to you that had this man been wear-
ing a different colored uniform that night, he
would not be sitting behind the counsel table and
undergoing the agony of a trial," he said.
Meshbesher also said the injury to Boucha's
eye was caused by a punch, not Forbes' stick.
"He (Forbes) is guilty of being a fierce com-
petitor in a game of violence, that's all," Mesh-
besher said.
Testifying in his own behalf Wednesday, Forbes
denied he had used his stick to injure Boucha.
Forbes said he probably was holding his stick
as he skated towards Boucha, intent on settling
the score for an earlier "sucker punch." But he
denied using the butt end as a spear, causing
the eye injury.
The gash required 30 stitches to close, and
Boucha, 24, says he still suffers from double
vision. Boucha also says he plans a civil suit
against Forbes, in an attempt to collect monetary
damages.
The two players had clashed earlier in the
game when they went into a corner for the
puck. Forbes admitted elbowing Boucha and
said the Minnesota player hit him with a
"sucker punch."
Forbes conceded that he fumed over the inci-
dent, thinking of ways to "even the score." But
he denied any intent to use the stick as a weapon.
Forbes testified that fighting is part of the
game and that a player who is intimidated be-
comes an easy mark for other players.

DAVE FORBES talked to reporters yesterday after the jury
in his trial retired for deliberation. He stands accused of
aggravated assault with a deadly weapon after attacking Henry
Boucha in a Jan. 4 hockey game.
The Michigan Daily
Sports
Major League Leaders

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SPORTS OF THE DAILY
Bowie Kuhn keeps
C
commissioner post
MILWAUKEE (/P) - Base- FINLEY wheeled and shot Commission announced that
l Commissioner B o w i e back at he walked out the Don King, the man behind the
in was re-elected to a sec- door "Just shows me some Ali-Frazier fight, has been giv-
seven-year term yesterday, more class." en a promoter's license in New
ting off an American Later Finley told newsmen York. King then announced that
gue move to oust him which that the two votes against Kuhn Frazier and Ali each has agreed
led by owners Charles O. were from Oakland and Balti- to fight Foreman here next
ley of Oakland Jerry Hoff- more. "I received word today July.
ger of Baltimore. at 7 a.m. that New York and
hey and two other AL own- Texas were changing their NL Desi a no-no
had voted against Kuhn votes," Finley said.
13 hours before today's The Oakland boss did not MILWAUKEE (A') - The
t meeting, and it seemed seem upset over losing the National League rejected pro-
the best the commissioner showdown with Kuhn. posals for designated hitter and
Id hope for was a staying "I LIKE to feel we all live designated runner rules, league
on in which a final vote on in a democratic America," he President Charles Fenney said
status would be tabled, said. "You win a few and you yesterday.
UT the Texas Rangers and lose a few. When you lose, you The American League in-
York Yankees, who had have to lose as graciously as stituted the designated hitter
d against the commissioner you do when you win." rule last year.
Wednesday, were swayed * * * Ray Kroc, owner of the San
rnight, and in the formal Au-Frazier again? Diego Padres, proposed the DH
, Kuhn was re-elected 22-2. NEWYORK( -) A rule, but it was defeated 10-2.
would have resigned if it N-A news The designated runner rule,
been tabled," Kuhn said at conference was held yesterday suggested by Bing Devine, gen-
ews conference. "I have to announce something old-Mu- eral manager of the St. Louis
g hammad Ali vs. Joe Frazier in Cardinals, was beaten 11-1.
ted to resign. for a lo anilon t1 tR
tomeaonOc an returnas tCodiatueaspractlc-e.

Based on 225 at Bats.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Player Club G AB R H Pect.
Carew Min 81 303 55 113 .373
Lynn Bsn 79 284 60 97 .342
Hargrove Tex 79 271 50 94 .338
Munson NY 84 319 42 104 .321
washington Oak 83 328 51 104 .317
Ystrzemski Bsn 85 307 59 96 .313
Hisle Min 61 225 34 70 .311
McRae KC 87 335 42 104 .310
G1. Brett KC It 349 408501 .304
Orta Chi 78 297' 41 15 .291
Home Runs
Bonds, New York, 20; R. Jack-
son, Oakland, 18; Burroughs, Texas,
18; Mayberry, Kansas City, 17;
Lynn, Boston, 16: Hendrick, Cleve-
land. 16; HORTON. DETROIT, 1;
G. Scott, Milwaukee,Eo T,
Runs Batted In
Lynn, Boston, 71; Rice, Boston,
61; HORTON, DETROIT, 61; L.
May, Baltimore, 59; G. scott, Mil-
waukee, 58.
Pitching 9 Decisions
. Palmer, Baltimore, 13-6, .684;
Kaat, Chicago, 13-6, .684; M. Torrez,
Baltimore, 10-5, .667; Bird, Kansas
City, 6-3, .667; Bosman, Oakland,
6-3, .667; Wise, Boston, 11-6, .647;
Blyleven, Minnesota , 7-4, .636;
Blue, Oakland, 12-7, .632.

Based on 225 at Bats.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Player Club G AB R H Pet.
Madlock Chi 79 320 45 113 .353
Morgan Cin 83 287 61 99 .345
Sanguillen Pgh 77 281 33 95 .238
0. Parker Pek. 77 201 44 91 .336
Watson Htn 84 313 41 102 .326
Cash Phi 89 376 65 122 .324
T. Simmons StL 84 296 44 96 .324
Bowa Phi - 63 274 34 88 .321
Rose Cia 90 379 58 121 .319
Jloskua IF 70 2t4 31 04 .318
Home Runs
L a r i n s ki, Philadelphia, ns;
Bench. Cincinnati, 19; Stargell,
Pittsburgh. 17; Schmidt, Philadel-
ohia, 61: Kingman. New York, 15;
0. Parker. Pittsburgh, 15; G. Foster,
Cincinnati. 15.
Runs Batted In
L uzci nas k I, Philadelphia, 29;
Bench, Cincinnati, 23; Watson,
Houston, 61; Morgan, Cincinnati,
60; staub, New York, 59.
Pitching 9 Decisions
Billineham, Cincinnati, 10-3, .769;
Gullett, Cincinnati, 9-3, .750;,Seav-
er, New York, 13-5, .722; S. Stone,
Chicago, 7-3, .700; Kirby, Cincin-
nati, 7-3, .700; Messersmith, Los
Angeles, 12-6, .667; Kison, Pitts-
burgh, 8-4, .667; R. Jones, San
Diego, 11-6, .647.

time and return to the practice
of law, but the persuasive pow-
ers of baseball's senior mem-
bers persuaded me to continue
for the best interests of the
game."
While'Kuhn was talking, Fin-
ley entered the room. The com-
missioner glared at him and
said, "You may leave my
room, Charlie."
WE MAKE
i T HAPPEN
UM Stylists
at the
UNION
Open Mon.-Sat.

41CLIl V1 v,. . U L b
produced something new-a
probable heavyweight title de-
fense by the winner against
George Foreman in New York
next July.
KE E N E T H Sherwood
of the New York State Athletic
TONIGHT 8:00
New York Street
Theatre Caravans .
present
BITTER HARVEST
SCHORLING AUD.
School of Ed. Bldg.
$1.50

WILLIAM POWELL NIGHT 1947
THE SENATOR WAS INDISCREET
(at 7:30)
Powell portlays a bird-brained Senator who lets a hot political diary get out
of his hands. A fine comedy by George Kaufman.
ANOTHER THIN MAN
(at 9:30)
Dashiell Hammet's famous super slueth reappears with Powell in the original
role. Myra Loy is back again as Nora.
SAT.: Janet Gaynor & Fredric March in A STAR IS BORN (at 7:30)
Michael Curtiz's SEA HAWK (at 9:30)
CINEMA GUILD TONIGHT AT OLD ARCH. AUD.
7:0&9:30 Both Films for $1.50

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