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July 12, 1975 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-07-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Saturdoy, July 12, 1975

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Five

Saura, ul 2,175TH ICIANDIYPgFie

Nixon aide named
(Continued from agel1) *ment, the CIA said Butterfield Prouty's c 1 a i m "absolu
Butterfield through a Washing- was granted access to sensitive false."
ton public relations firm which CIA information in 1959 while Later in the day, Prouty
provided cover for CIA agents. working under the deputy chief questioned behind closed d
Prouty said he met E. Howard of staff for Air Force personnel. before a House intelligence
Hunt, a former CIA agent and But it said he "was, in no way committee.
later convicted Watergate bur- under the authority of the SEN. HOWARD Baker
glar, who agreed to contact agency." Tenn.), a member of the Ser
Butterfield to h e I p arrange At the White House, the CIA Intelligence Committee, said
White House support for a group said, Butterfield required access previously had been awar
seeking the release of Indochina to intelligence given only to re- rumors regarding Butterf
prisoners of war, including un- cipients holding special clear- and the CIA but that Prt.
dercover CIA agents. ances. "He was provided these statements added "a new
HE SAID he did not know for clearances," it said. mension."
certain whether Butterfield was The CIA did say, however, Baker added that it would
on the CIA payroll at the time. that "the exchange of govern- "a huge coincidence" if the
CIA spokesman, who original- ment employes by detailing them who was custodian -f the
ly had refused all comment on to other agencies or depart- corded Oval Office conve
the Prouty claim, later said ments, as Director William Col- tions which ultimately. for
that Butterfield "has never by has pointed out, is a long- Nixon to resign was in fac
been assigned to or worked for established a n d widespread CIA man.
the CIA in any capacity." practice in government. Asked by reporters if ,.e k
That statement appeared to PRESIDENTIAL press secre- of any other White Hopsse
conflict with an official White tary Ron Nessen said the White cials with CIA connecti
House biography of Butterfield House has "no information to Prouty said that in the e
which described him as having substantiate the allegation that 1960s Alexander H a i g
participated in "Cuban origade a member of the previous ad- served as an Army liaison,
affairs relating back to the Bay ministration was a secret CIA cer with the CIA. But Pr'
of Pigs affair," the CIA's abort- agent or indeed any kind of cautioned that he did not ki
ed invasion of Cuba. agent." whether Haig has had any r
ELABORATING on its state- Butterfield's wife c a 11 e d tion with the CIA since then.
Fleming announces search
committee for LSA dean

s CA contact

tely
was
.)ors
sub-
(R-
nate
d he
e of
field
rty's
di-
d be
man
re-
ersa-
rced
ct a
Clew
offi-
ons,
sarly
had
offi-
outy
now
eia-

PROUTY'S statements came
in the wake of statements by
members of the House' intelli-
gence panel that staff investi-.
gators had seen evidence of CIA
infiltration of the White House
and various government agen-
cies..
Rep. Lucien Nedzi (D-Mich.),
chairman of the intelligence
panel made available portion
of a page from a 1973 internal
CIA memorandum concerning
questionable agency activities
which apparently formed the
basis for the claim of infiltra-
tion.
As read by Nedzi in a tele-
phone interview, the May 1973
document states that "for many
years the CIA has detailed em-
ployes to the immediate office
of the White House and to com-
ponents intimately associated
with the office of the President,
such as the Council on Interna-
tional Economic Policy and the
President's Foreign Intelligence
Advisory Board. At present we
have no clericals or professional
assigned to the immediate Whte
The expression "hair of the
dog" goes back to Roman
times when it was believed the
best antidote for a dog bite was
the burned hair of the dog that
had attacked you.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

House -office although we have
one man detailed to their :om-
munications section."
NEDZI SAID the memo gave
no indication of who in the
White House was aware that
these detailed employes were
CIA officials.
Nedzi also said the memo
stated that the secretary to
f o r m e r Commerce S.cretary
Peter Peterson was an agency
employe. Nedzi added he learn-
ed independently of the memo
that Peterson was aware of this.
The memo also outlined the
presence of a total of six CIA
employes at the Treasury De-
partment and one CIA officer
at the Agency for International
Development.
Sen. Frank Church, chairman
of the Senate committee, who
has also read the memo, told
reporters that "on the basis of
that page we have no evidence
that agents were planted in the
White House." Church addlcd
that he planned to investigate
Prouty's claim, includiig call-
ing Butterfield as a witness.
QR. Paul C. Uslan
OPTOMETRIST
Full Contact Lens Service
VisulEsaminstions
548 CHURCH ST.
663-2476

(Continued from Page i)
Economics D i r e c t o r Harold
Shapiro, and graduate student
Karen Stahl.
THE TWO as yet unnamed
members of the committee must
be students under the Regents'
guidelines. Their names are ex-
pected' to be announced within
the next few weeks.
Although the new committee
has only met once, it is already
planning to ask the Regents for
more specific deanship qualifi-
cotion criteria than was given"
the previous search group.
Bardwick said yesterday that
at the group's first meeting
Tuesdav she asked that "further
specifics of job requirements,"
be handed down by the Regents.
"We need a better handle for
the job and its important pre-
requisites."
FULFILLING an affirmative
action policy still seems to be
an objective of at least some of
the group. "We have to keep
affirmative action in mind," de-
clared committee member Stor-
gan, "the University is some-
what far-wanting in this area."
However, Bardwick empha-
sized that if "specific prior ex-
perience is needed for the dean-
ship . . . there are low num-
bers of affirmative action (mi-
nority) people that could fill
this position."
The Cobb affair may have
other affects on the new search
for a dean since all committee
members available for comment
yesterday indicated that they
were acutely aware of the Cobb
controversy,
"OBVIOUSLY every person is

aware of it (the Cobb affair),"
Bardwick stated.
Committee members Shapiro
and lDorr emphasized tie Re-
gents' guideline stating that no
previous candidates will receive
"prejudice," while M o r g a n
pointed out that the search has
now "become a delicate situa-
tion."
Both the Regents and the new
committee are under even more
pressure than last fall because
the administration has since
made their choice for the dean-
ship official.
FLEMING and Rhodes last
January recommended acting
LSA dean Billy Frye to the
Regents "on the basis of his ad-
ministrative and budgetary ex-
perience."
Frye will have been acting
dean for at least 18 months by
the time the committee finishes
its search - a fact which could
if
you
see
news
happen
call
76-DAILY

improve his chances if tbeing
selected.
Fleming asked that the com-
mittee complete its task by Dec.
1, but Morgan explained t!at
"this is only a kind of working
date."
SHAPIRO stated that he ex-
pects the committee to "recam-
mend a panel of three to seven
candidates . . . out of between
100-200 nominations."
Fleming said, "The committee
has the responsibility of pre-
senting a panel of candidates
whom the committee, after con-
sultation with faculty and others,
regard as capable of ccupying
the position of dean of toe Cot-
lege of Literature, Science and
the Arts."
Apparently the new group will
actively search for nominations,
and not simply use the former
list gathered last summer. Sha-
piro said, "We have not begun
the advertising yet."
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